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  1. #1

    Default 32 vs 35 express cruiser

    Looking at two similar boats, with very similar layout and I/O setup. The only difference, true difference is length. 32ft versus 35ft. I plan on doing mostly protected waters, but in the next two seasons or so, I do plan on doing some more open water travel and longer distances. I don't plan on taking on anything over 2-3ft chops, as I have small ones, is there a significance in how smooth a ride in open water a 32ft versus a 35ft would perform? TIA

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: 32 vs 35 express cruiser

    Welcome to the forum Ruben,

    I'm afraid I can't help when the topic is blue water boats so I'll move this post to Everything Else and we'll see who knows their boats.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  3. #3
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    Default Re: 32 vs 35 express cruiser

    Welcome. Interesting question for a fly fishing forum. I do not know how many responses you will get as the majority of our boats here would be drift style river floating boats or fishing rafts, both are rowed. However, I happen to have been a boat guy and owned several express cruisers from 26' to 33' and know several folks that owned larger that I am familiar with up to 48'. My 33' was a Sea Ray 330 Sundancer, with an 11'6" beam and drafted 2.5'. In chop, the depth of a deeper V has advantages, to cut through. The wider beam can however sometimes be a hindrance in not only lifting in rough water but in general handling. I'm assuming that if you are looking at those sized boats you are an experienced boater and capable of maneuvering....but bow and/or stern thrusters are a must in current and docking, even with a skilled user and twins. The 35' may house larger engines and could be potentially ordered with direct drives, but you didn't specify new or used. Personally, my favorite boat was a 290 Sea Ray Sundancer with counter rotating twins and a 9'6" beam, for me, it was a perfect combination of size and still having great maneuverability. But there are many variables you didn't cover, like powertrain comparison between the two boats, direct drive option, beams, usual usage with how many occupants, overnights? Longer trips? Trailerable needed?(own a semi tug truck?), Marina slip vs Beam, and the list goes on and on. To your original question, the hull design and V have far more impact on smooth ride than the size difference between 32' and 35' lengths, have you water tested either yet?
    Last edited by cooutlaw; 04-05-2019 at 02:50 AM.

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    Default Re: 32 vs 35 express cruiser

    What is the difference in beam and draft and dead-rise? What is the difference in fuel capacity and what engines are in each. Look at the electronics are they older? newer? Have a marine surveyor look at both boats a good surveyor can tell you a lot about the hull and the mechanical condition of the boat. Boats that size should not be surveyed (checked out) by a average boater the repair costs are just too high for a boat that size with hull or mechanical problems. After having both boats surveyed go over what was found and decide what you can live with and what is a real problem for you. Blisters, osmosis, leaky thru-hull fittings can be hard to detect without the proper tools a good surveyor will have the tools to make an honest evaluation of the boat.

    I have owned/run several boats up to 80 miles offshore in the Pacific fishing for tuna, they ranged in size from 24' to 32' each had their own characteristics and most had Diesel engines. Maintaining a boat that can get you there and back safely is imperative. Your beam vs length, dead-rise and hull design will determine what kind of ride you get. It is not just the length. Some boats hull design works excellent going in to a swell but that same boat will lack lateral stability going with the swell (like riding a knifes edge). While other boats will pound in to the swell but ride like a magic carpet going with the swell. Same goes with traveling cross-swell some boats with a high center of gravity will rock terrifically and others are very stable. If you can find a boat with characteristics you enjoy it's great. You will want to determine the ride by actually taking both boats out under similar conditions. Sorry I can't be more specific but your description does not give me much to go on.

    Regards,

    Tim C.

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  6. #5
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    Default Re: 32 vs 35 express cruiser

    ^^^^This^^^ far better said, than I did in my post.

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  8. #6
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    Default Re: 32 vs 35 express cruiser

    As one add, I will also say, noting that you stated you "didn't plan on anything over 2-3' chops" .....even in "protected" water...it doesn't take much to get to 2-3' whitecaps...a good wind and/or larger boat traffic can create that situation in a hurry. There were many days that I would have welcomed only 2'-3' chop on protected waters. Whether you plan on it or not, inevitably, at some point, you are going to experience far greater chop than that, and usually when you weren't planning on it, or when heading back in to the marina and it looks like a rush hour traffic jam on a major freeway and every boat is juggling hard to keep a bearing and not get swamped. I enjoyed my time with boats, lots of great memories, lots of beautiful nights spent on the lake, lot's of fun with other owners in the marina, plenty of positives, and I sometimes miss it, but, it's always been the same...whatever you budget for your acquisition, operation, storage/slip, maintenance and repair, and all other associated costs, just double that number and you'll be pretty close when it's all said and done. The bigger the boat, the bigger the money pit, and the more headaches to keep it operational. And further, I found one truth for sure....the bigger I went (all boaters go bigger each upgrade) the less enjoyable time I had....it takes a great deal of skill to operate and maintain a larger vessel, you become responsible for the lives of passengers on a far more complicated scale of operation, it increases the stress and decreases the fun exponentially. I added this in case you happen to be a newer and less experienced owner or are stepping up significantly in size of vessel, there are a ton of things to consider beyond the surface level. Lastly, I hope you get many years of enjoyment out of boating, regardless of which boat you choose. But be aware, the two happiest days in a boat owners life are the day he buys it and the day he sells it. Goodluck!

    Girls in FL 2.jpg

    Here's a pic of my wife and her girlfriends on a girls weekend a few years back on my friends 48' er, moored in Ft. Lauderdale on the intercoastal.

    As an example to the above points....this is a $100K + a year fuel, insurance, and maintenance program, not to mention the initial investment, which, I can assure you, was absolutely not for the faint of heart at 10+ times that annual anti. My point...far better him than me. I was no where near these cost factors in my ownership (way out of my league) but it still makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up every time I think about how much money I spent, I figure owning a larger cruiser cost a guy about $1000 an hour usage run time, if he uses it 50 or so hours a season.
    Last edited by cooutlaw; 04-05-2019 at 02:50 AM.

  9. #7

    Default Re: 32 vs 35 express cruiser

    As everyone knows the word BOAT is actually an acronym for Break Out Another Thousand. Or as my sailing relatives put it, a "boat buck" is $1000, because whenever you have to spend money on it it is usually in increments of 1000. That being said, one summer I had pretty much unlimited access to a 31 trawler on Lake Champlain and I have great memories. If I could afford it I would buy a boat in a heartbeat, there are far worse things to spend money on.

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