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Thread: New to tying-bendbacks

  1. #1

    Default New to tying-bendbacks

    Tied these over the last couple days

    Wifey dubbed the black one "the midnight special"




    What do yall think?
    Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

  2. Likes baseman1 liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Brookline, MA
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    1,241

    Default Re: New to tying-bendbacks

    Look nice to me, especially for someone new to tying them.

    Something I would recommend for most types of flies in general is to do white (or light colored) bottoms. Most fish have white bottoms as a camouflage measure and flies tied in this way will look more realistic to their predators.

    Another suggestion: I like to tie my bend backs fairly sparsely and use natural materials. If you use a lot of materials, it can be hard for the hook to push through it all during a take. I have found that this is especially true for more dense and tightly packed synthetic materials that tend to cling to each other.

    Here are some bend backs I tie:






  4. #3

    Default Re: New to tying-bendbacks

    Thanks for the great feeback!!!

    Ill be tying some new ones

    Sent from my SGH-T989 using Tapatalk 2

  5. #4

    Default Re: New to tying-bendbacks

    I love tying bendbacks and the variations are almost endless. As suggested by Nick K, tying them a bit sparser will definitely make them easier to cast and even more effective.

    Great start though!!
    Less likey, more green dots
    BrookFieldAngler.com

  6. #5
    turbineblade Guest

    Default Re: New to tying-bendbacks

    Question:

    Do they make hooks specifically for this purpose, or does everyone just take something like a SW streamer hook and a pair of pliers?

    I've seen this pattern and do think I might have to tie a few along with the usual bucktail patterns I throw out there. I could see them being useful in certain situations.

  7. #6

    Default Re: New to tying-bendbacks

    I just bend em. If I'm going to be tying up quite a few, I'll sit down and bend a good dozen or more up at a time. Takes me a few minutes to knock them all out.
    Less likey, more green dots
    BrookFieldAngler.com

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Pocono Lake , Pennsylvania
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    Default Re: New to tying-bendbacks

    That black one would be killer night time Stripers! Nice job! I just bend them as well and they work fine! Like Nick . And like the other Nick white bellies is a good thing for day time flys!
    "I was born to fish" Lee Wulff
    "There's more B.S. in fly fishing then there is in a Kansas feedlot." Lefty Kreh
    " It ain't over till it's over." Yogi Berra
    "Your not old,you've simply acquired a patina." Swirlchaser

  9. #8
    Join Date
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    Manning, S. C. (formerly MD)
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    Default Re: New to tying-bendbacks

    Mustad made a hook years ago, which was nothing more than a bent 34007. They designated it a 34005. Frankly the bent section was bent a bit farther than I like. Only a slight bend was needed. If you find any of them, they're still a pretty OK hook for tying on.

    I believe I saw some others recently too, perhaps Tiemco, but not sure about that.

    Before Mustad came out with a bendback hook, I also used to do as brookfieldangler and sit & bend the hooks with pliers. The older stainless hooks, 34007 or the longer 34011 worked great, as the metal was not so hard that they broke easily. Newer, better hooks with harder tempering might be a problem. I broke enough of the older style hooks.

    Now, I rarely even bother with bending hooks. I found that most any straight shank hook would work fine even without the front bend. Since I tie most with bucktail, it's buoyancy aids in keeping the fly inverted, as long as the hair is tied inside the bend of the hook.

    I also tie them on another hook that Owner made. It's a hook that was intended for plastic baits & is now discontinued, but it had a very similar bend in the front section of the shank. They called it a "Longneck". This hook came with a small cone shaped piece of plastic on the shank, that was used to lock a plastic bait onto the hook, to keep it from sliding. That little cone also works well to aid in propping up materials, or is easily removed. The only draw back to this hook is it's not cheap & was only made in a black nickel finish, so is not as corrosion resistant as a stainless or tinned hook. Still it's an extremely strong & sharp hook, and well suited for freshwater fishing. Again, it's another hook that should you find them, is worth tying on!

    I found a tackle shop awhile back that was closing them out for 79 cents per pack, in size 2 & 1, and purchased several packs.

    Here's a fly I tied on that Owner "Longneck" hook. Not a typical bendback, but I'm sure you can see how well this hook fits the style.
    Remember, no one likes to be behind the big truck, but that's better than being under it!

  10. #9

    Default Re: New to tying-bendbacks

    I don't know who makes these hooks for Orvis, but the work great for Bendbacks.

    Orvis Bass Bug Hooks

    Looks like Daiichi makes a similar hook (Maybe for Orvis) Daiichi D2720


  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Brookline, MA
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    Default Re: New to tying-bendbacks

    You can get the same style of hook from Allen at a fraction of the price. I won't say that the Orvis hooks aren't a little better quality, but I do just fine with Allen hooks and my wallet is better for it.

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