Thanks Thanks:  1
Likes Likes:  90
Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 77
  1. #21

    Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

    Really good stuff mikel... I once read that a healthy trout, ready for release will almost always appear to be looking down... and a stressed fish will have eyes that are "centered" and glazed... ever heard of this?

    Anyway, here's an interesting CPR story (catch-photo-release)... this is Earl the Doorman, long story, but my friends and I caught and released him three times over three seasons. He always took the same spot in the pool (hovering ghost-like in front of an old shed door lodged against the bank).



    Other than the obvious, we know for a fact that it was the same fish because we were probably not the FIRST ones to tangle with and release Earl... check out the mangled (but healed) left lip on this close-up.



    A sudden drop in water levels due to a faulty water exchange pump left Earl to die in a puddle sadly the fall after we last saw him. Tough ending for a great warrior... but a good C&R example up to that point.
    "Joe"

    "We fish for pleasure; I for mine, you for yours." -James Leisenring

  2. Likes Ard, spiderninja, von behr liked this post
  3. Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

    Awesome thanks

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
    Posts
    15,503
    Blog Entries
    113

    Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

    Quote Originally Posted by stenacron View Post
    Really good stuff mikel... I once read that a healthy trout, ready for release will almost always appear to be looking down... and a stressed fish will have eyes that are "centered" and glazed... ever heard of this?

    Anyway, here's an interesting CPR story (catch-photo-release)... this is Earl the Doorman, long story, but my friends and I caught and released him three times over three seasons. He always took the same spot in the pool (hovering ghost-like in front of an old shed door lodged against the bank).



    Other than the obvious, we know for a fact that it was the same fish because we were probably not the FIRST ones to tangle with and release Earl... check out the mangled (but healed) left lip on this close-up.



    A sudden drop in water levels due to a faulty water exchange pump left Earl to die in a puddle sadly the fall after we last saw him. Tough ending for a great warrior... but a good C&R example up to that point.
    That's a neat remembrance Joe,

    I had a longtime friend like that, that I paid a visit to each year back east. A brown trout that lived in a most inaccessible spot. I caught him once each season while he grew into a fine specimen. I left my mountain stream behind in 2004 and like to think he may either have died of old age or is still under that log.

    Ard

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  5. Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

    Great thread! I'm fairly new to trout and I didn't realize how fragile they were. I always take special care of them now. Catch, quick pic, release.

  6. #25

    Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

    Great article Mike! This thread is a little old, however being new and just reading it I felt the need to add my .02

    Although I am new on this site, I have been chasing trout up & down rivers/streams for about 35 years now. In all of those years, the best purchase I have made was on a Ketchum Release tool. You never have to touch the fish or take them out of the water. I use this for all fish I'm not going to photo because it gets them loose quickly with the least amount of stress.

    I have a couple of tips for the ones you want to photo. Now this may be old hat to a lot of you so this is geared for those that might not know. First and foremost, ALWAYS carry a C&R net! You never know when you will hook into a lunker. Now, if you are fishing alone, you can use the net to support & "pose" the fish for the picture (it also makes a great indicator of size . This way you are keeping it in the water the whole time. If you have someone to take the pic for you, grab in front of the tail (not much pressure needed) and slide your other hand under the belly all while keeping the fish in the net. When the photographer is ready, tilt (don't lift) the fish towards the camera & take the pic. The key to these methods is to keep it in the water the whole time. As stated before, the lack of oxygen will kill them much faster than just the fight.

    This is not the only way to do it by any means. It is just a way that I have found puts as little stress to them as we can. We are stewards of our environment and should treat it as such.

    Hope this helps someone!
    Carlton

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
    Posts
    15,503
    Blog Entries
    113

    Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

    Hello Carlton & welcome to the forum!

    My best buy for treating the fish better was a waterproof camera. I don't get the grip and grin photos but I still get a few if the fish doesn't slip away before I can get the camera in the water. For people who love fish pictures I would highly recommend a weather and waterproof cameras, I paid only $129.99 for mine.



    Enjoy the site and please chime in whenever you see fit,

    Ard

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Ben Lomond, Ca
    Posts
    2,253
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

    Quote Originally Posted by gr8outdoorz View Post
    Although I am new on this site, I have been chasing trout up & down rivers/streams for about 35 years now. In all of those years, the best purchase I have made was on a Ketchum Release tool. You never have to touch the fish or take them out of the water. I use this for all fish I'm not going to photo because it gets them loose quickly with the least amount of stress.
    Carlton, I haven't used many "release tools" but have always heard that the Ketchum was really effective...There's another that a lot of guys seem to use in the PNW that's just a piece of wire and a cork...I have a link...

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2G_S-2rjNw]Guides Choice Original Fish Release - YouTube[/ame]

    I'm usually barbless, so the hook often just falls out in the net for me and I really agree about using and having a good release net whenever possible.

    Nice to have this resurface occasionally...maybe someone will profit from it...

    It's actually not necessary to photo every fish we catch...I like what Ard does with underwater shots, but jeez, I just like to fish. Seems like we've all accepted the doubting Thomas fishing credo:

    "no picture = it didn't happen"

    At this point, if it's a special day/fish/place I'll take a pic...but only if the conditions are good for the fish. But...I don't carry pics of my family with me. I remember what they look like and that's good enough...

    -Mike

  9. #28

    Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

    Quote Originally Posted by mikel View Post
    Carlton, I haven't used many "release tools" but have always heard that the Ketchum was really effective...There's another that a lot of guys seem to use in the PNW that's just a piece of wire and a cork...I have a link...

    Guides Choice Original Fish Release - YouTube

    I'm usually barbless, so the hook often just falls out in the net for me and I really agree about using and having a good release net whenever possible.

    Nice to have this resurface occasionally...maybe someone will profit from it...

    It's actually not necessary to photo every fish we catch...I like what Ard does with underwater shots, but jeez, I just like to fish. Seems like we've all accepted the doubting Thomas fishing credo:

    "no picture = it didn't happen"

    At this point, if it's a special day/fish/place I'll take a pic...but only if the conditions are good for the fish. But...I don't carry pics of my family with me. I remember what they look like and that's good enough...

    -Mike
    Mike,
    Like you I'm always barbless. I smash them down before tying. I rarely take pics of fish. If its a trophy & hasn't been a long fight I'll take one. I'll also snap a couple when I'm on the Little Red without my fiancee (fishing partner). She is in Pharmacy school so she doesn't go during semesters. She always makes me promise to send her pics of browns (her favorite) when I'm there. I always get caught up in the moment & forget to take out a camera.
    Carlton

  10. #29
    thepiper Guest

    Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

    Excellent post. I fish a lot of catch and release waters, and just recently I have been seeing a lot of dead fish. I think it's important that people know to take extra caution during hot summer days. Fish mortality rates really sky rocket with the warmer temps. By the way, first post. Good to be here.

  11. #30
    turbineblade Guest

    Default Re: Practicing Proper Catch and Release

    I occasionally reread this thread and it strikes me as "unique" that many of you have a fondness for non-native Brown trout to the point of not using a camera, etc. to ensure healthy release. So that they'll.....go on to breed?

    Note: I totally understand this perspective and would probably feel this way about "earl" if I had seen and caught the same fish over and over.

    I just view this as unique, because a person could argue that tossing brown trout into the woods upon capture might save some native dace, sculpin, sucker, crayfish, hellbenders, etc. species. I would never, ever do this -- don't take me wrong. I take pride in releasing fish alive and healthy, particuarly since I'm rarely going to eat them.

    To me, there's just a pretty fine line between how we view trout and how we view carp and other non-native species. Before someone says "brown trout don't harm native species like carp" or something -- wait until more data comes in for native hellbenders.....most state agencies are avoiding this like the NFL and concussions....given that they've invested all this money and time into making sure people can fish dry flies to trout in places where they really shouldn't be. Most of these studies haven't given us a clear understanding anyway, so I think it's inappropriate to make that assumption. I just saw a study that suggests snakeheads aren't having the devastating impacts on some natives that we originally thought.

    Is it just that you feel fondness for a particular fish for no other reason than that you like the fish? (since releasing it healthy essentially means nothing from an ecological perspective...if you're in the U.S. anyway).

    This same feeling extends to all the $ and licensing required to fish for these same species. And believe me, no one on this forum probably has more licenses than I do to fish in the DC region where driving a few miles puts you into 4 different licenses, not including trout licenses.

    One last - I don't want everyone to want to shoot me! I just think there's some value in thinking about stuff like this and I thought that maybe some folks would find it interesting if nothing else. I'm not a fish killer! I promise -- no punches.....

Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Catch and Release
    By Sep in forum Southeast U.S.
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-01-2010, 01:56 PM
  2. Catch and Release HELP
    By Dotsonnt in forum Coldwater Fly Fishing
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 04-03-2009, 06:27 PM
  3. Catch And Release
    By mikeo in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 09-04-2008, 04:14 PM
  4. Catch and Release?
    By larrysmith9865 in forum The Lodge Den
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-23-2008, 11:07 PM
  5. Age old question : catch/release or catch/keep ?
    By tie one on in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-13-2006, 09:22 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •