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  1. #1

    Default Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers

    So I have a simple question. Why is it that among the flyfishing crowd rivers seem to be preferred over lakes? Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems like fly fisherman target rivers over lakes. Don't get me wrong I absolutely do love fly fishing rivers as much as the next guy, but I still love stillwater flyfishing, as I grew fishing both spin cast and fly fishing at a mountain lake. But it always amazes me how every time I fish at a lake, I'm usually the only one fly fishing, while often times at rivers you have to fight for a spot. It seems to me that rivers are overcrowded and lakes are overlooked. Would anyone mind explaining why rivers seemed loved to death and lakes seem like forgotton opportunities. Or am I seeing this all wrong?

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  3. #2

    Default Re: Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers

    Quote Originally Posted by jdarkfox View Post
    So I have a simple question. Why is it that among the flyfishing crowd rivers seem to be preferred over lakes? Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems like fly fisherman target rivers over lakes. Don't get me wrong I absolutely do love fly fishing rivers as much as the next guy, but I still love stillwater flyfishing, as I grew fishing both spin cast and fly fishing at a mountain lake. But it always amazes me how every time I fish at a lake, I'm usually the only one fly fishing, while often times at rivers you have to fight for a spot. It seems to me that rivers are overcrowded and lakes are overlooked. Would anyone mind explaining why rivers seemed loved to death and lakes seem like forgotton opportunities. Or am I seeing this all wrong?
    We don't want to deal with worm dunkers, and they seem to prefer lakes and ponds.

    On a serious note, I think most fly fishermen prefer rivers to lakes because it is more interesting. I spend more than 90% of my time on rivers and streams. Nothing wrong with stillwater, it's just that moving water has so many more variables. It requires reading the water, getting a drag-free drift, requires all different types of casts/presentations (upstream, downstream, across, quarter up, quarter down, reach mend etc.). Moving water usually offers better sight fishing opportunities, although I realize this isn't always the case. Plus, the bug life on lakes and ponds pales in comparison to most rivers.

    Also, rivers are fishable year round which in my book is a huge plus. I fish year-round and a good percentage of all fly fishermen do, whereas spin/bait guys seem to be more fair-weathered (no pun intended). Fly fishing in general seems to be better suited for rivers and streams as opposed to lakes, unless you're fishing a full sinking line. I guess it makes sense when you consider all of these reasons.

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  5. #3

    Default Re: Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers

    All this

    "It requires reading the water, getting a drag-free drift, requires all different types of casts/presentations (upstream, downstream, across, quarter up, quarter down, reach mend etc.). Moving water usually offers better sight fishing opportunities, although I realize this isn't always the case. Plus, the bug life on lakes and ponds pales in comparison to most rivers"

    We have them all in the stillwater. You still have to mend in the stillwater, quarter up quarter down cast especially in the cove. The mountain lakes are highly exposed to the strong wind, crystal clear water where the fish can see your nostrils. "Blind casting" is more difficult and tiring than sight fishing.
    You can't find the seams or see the rocks or fallen timber like in the rivers, difficult to estimate the depth 20ft away from where you are standing. You have to get down where the fish are holding that could be 20ft below or right at your feet.
    The moon is playing a big role in the water depth and movement as well, the fish will tend to venture to the new water where they had to access before, the barometric pressure is also a thing to consider, when the turn over, and bla bla bla.

    I think fly fishing in the stillwater is more challenging than the rivers, but what do I know, I don't fish the rivers.

    I think we'd better keep the reel fly fisherman in their rivers, so the bigger stillwater fish are still accessible for the lesser stillwater fly fisherman.
    I am highly qualified to comment in this forum after receiving a Specialized High Intensive Training (S.H.I.T) at the Olde Schitt Institute of Technology (O.S.H.I.T).

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  7. #4
    james w 3 3 Guest

    Default Re: Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers

    Quote Originally Posted by cotter View Post
    We don't want to deal with worm dunkers, and they seem to prefer lakes and ponds.

    On a serious note, I think most fly fishermen prefer rivers to lakes because it is more interesting. I spend more than 90% of my time on rivers and streams. Nothing wrong with stillwater, it's just that moving water has so many more variables. It requires reading the water, getting a drag-free drift, requires all different types of casts/presentations (upstream, downstream, across, quarter up, quarter down, reach mend etc.). Moving water usually offers better sight fishing opportunities, although I realize this isn't always the case. Plus, the bug life on lakes and ponds pales in comparison to most rivers.

    Also, rivers are fishable year round which in my book is a huge plus. I fish year-round and a good percentage of all fly fishermen do, whereas spin/bait guys seem to be more fair-weathered (no pun intended). Fly fishing in general seems to be better suited for rivers and streams as opposed to lakes, unless you're fishing a full sinking line. I guess it makes sense when you consider all of these reasons.
    I started on streams, but now do much, much more stillwater than rivers and streams.

    And, I'm sorry, but every single reason you have stated is contrary to my experience.

    Reading water, weather, different fly presentations, sight casting to fish in skinny water, a plethora of insect and non-insect life, floating/midge tip/intermediate and sinking line, and more, are all variables that we have to work out day to day and even hour to hour when fishing stillwater with flies.

    Oh yeah, we fish year round too. And for more species.

  8. #5

    Default Re: Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers

    Quote Originally Posted by runningfish View Post
    All this

    "It requires reading the water, getting a drag-free drift, requires all different types of casts/presentations (upstream, downstream, across, quarter up, quarter down, reach mend etc.). Moving water usually offers better sight fishing opportunities, although I realize this isn't always the case. Plus, the bug life on lakes and ponds pales in comparison to most rivers"

    We have them all in the stillwater. You still have to mend in the stillwater, quarter up quarter down cast especially in the cove. The mountain lakes are highly exposed to the strong wind, crystal clear water where the fish can see your nostrils. "Blind casting" is more difficult and tiring than sight fishing.
    You can't find the seams or see the rocks or fallen timber like in the rivers, difficult to estimate the depth 20ft away from where you are standing. You have to get down where the fish are holding that could be 20ft below or right at your feet.
    The moon is playing a big role in the water depth and movement as well, the fish will tend to venture to the new water where they had to access before, the barometric pressure is also a thing to consider, when the turn over, and bla bla bla.

    I think fly fishing in the stillwater is more challenging than the rivers, but what do I know, I don't fish the rivers.

    I think we'd better keep the reel fly fisherman in their rivers, so the bigger stillwater fish are still accessible for the lesser stillwater fly fisherman.
    One mend every 30 seconds will keep a drag free drift in stillwater. Mending is much more important in moving water, let's not kid ourselves. There is no upstream, downstream, quarter up, quarter down etc. in stillwater because there is no "upstream" and "downstream." I said sight fishing opportunities are usually better in moving water, I didn't say that they don't exist in stillwater. Looks like your reading comprehension needs a bit of work. And I still stand by that statement 100%, here in Colorado our rivers offer some of the best sight fishing.

  9. #6

    Default Re: Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers

    Not trying to change your statement nor fishing preferences with my poor reading comprehension. But I'll take the insult with grace and wish you to always have a perfect grade in reading comprehension.

    The next time I am on a lake, I'll mend, mend and mend some more and mend again.
    I am highly qualified to comment in this forum after receiving a Specialized High Intensive Training (S.H.I.T) at the Olde Schitt Institute of Technology (O.S.H.I.T).

  10. #7

    Default Re: Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers

    Quote Originally Posted by james w 3 3 View Post
    I started on streams, but now do much, much more stillwater than rivers and streams.

    And, I'm sorry, but every single reason you have stated is contrary to my experience.

    Reading water, weather, different fly presentations, sight casting to fish in skinny water, a plethora of insect and non-insect life, floating/midge tip/intermediate and sinking line, and more, are all variables that we have to work out day to day and even hour to hour when fishing stillwater with flies.

    Oh yeah, we fish year round too. And for more species.
    I'm amazed as to how people could argue that reading water is more important in stillwater fishing. For the most part, fish hold in all depths and areas of a lake or pond. Sure, some areas hold higher concentrations than others, but you can find fish pretty much anywhere. If you were to argue that fish don't hold in all areas of a lake or pond, well that would be contrary to my experiences of every single lake or pond that I fish. In moving water, there are certain parts of the river where fish do not hold and these areas need to be separated from the areas which do hold fish. Again, I stand by my statement 100%, reading water is more important in moving water. Where I live in Colorado, insect life has much more variation in rivers as opposed to lakes. Also, our lakes freeze over, that's pretty obvious.

    It appears that you also had some difficulty reading my post. I did not say, nor did I imply, that sight fishing, hatches, difficult presentations etc. aren't available in stillwater. I simply said that in my experience rivers have more variables and are offer more challenges.

    By the way, I can catch browns, rainbows, smallmouth, largemouth, channel catfish, common and mirror carp, as well as an occasional walleye from the South Platte through Denver. Rivers can offer just as many, if not more species than stillwater.

    ---------- Post added at 12:07 AM ---------- Previous post was at 12:02 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by runningfish View Post
    Not trying to change your statement nor fishing preferences with my poor reading comprehension. But I'll take the insult with grace and wish you to always have a perfect grade in reading comprehension.
    Wasn't meant to be an insult, just an observation. You didn't really seem to "get" my post. I'm not trying to insult stillwater fishermen in the slightest (I'm one of them). Man, you have some thin skin.

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  12. #8
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    Default Re: Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers



    You just have to watch a little Hank sometimes to lighten thing up!!

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  14. #9

    Default Re: Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers

    Does Obama need to have another "beer summit" ?

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  16. #10
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    Default Re: Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers

    Quote Originally Posted by jdarkfox View Post
    So I have a simple question. Why is it that among the flyfishing crowd rivers seem to be preferred over lakes? Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems like fly fisherman target rivers over lakes. Don't get me wrong I absolutely do love fly fishing rivers as much as the next guy, but I still love stillwater flyfishing, as I grew fishing both spin cast and fly fishing at a mountain lake. But it always amazes me how every time I fish at a lake, I'm usually the only one fly fishing, while often times at rivers you have to fight for a spot. It seems to me that rivers are overcrowded and lakes are overlooked. Would anyone mind explaining why rivers seemed loved to death and lakes seem like forgotton opportunities. Or am I seeing this all wrong?
    Good question, for me I'm better at reading the water/structure on a stream and I know that hatches better, not so good on stillwater, plus where I live I don't encounter crowded stream fishing very often so I just gravitate to stream fishing most of the time. I still enjoy stillwater fishing, but I have to admit that I'm not that good at it.
    Larry


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