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  1. Default Help a new guy out

    I have been reading up on nymph fishing, the different styles, and whatnot. I have a question that does not seem to be answered anywhere. Is it possible to nymph the same way without an indicator (not high sticking) as you would with one?

    It seems that was the old school way of doing it. I don't want to get into the debate, I am merely curious if it can be done effectively and maybe some tips for doing so.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Help a new guy out

    Yes it can be. The original old school method, get yourself a light colored fly line, I like white, then all you have to do is watch the end of your fly line for any kind of movement other then a normal drift.
    Another approach when in clear water is to sight fish, in this case you can watch the end of the fly line and/or movement of the fish or the fishes mouth opening. There's lots of ways to skin a cat!
    Larry


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Default Re: Help a new guy out

    Wookie,
    Besides High sticking or using the end of your line as an indicator you can also swing a nymph like you do a wet fly or streamer. The difference with a nymph is I just swing and dangle at the end of the cast instead of swing and stripping it back in at the end of the swing.

    Another technique is to use the "Liesenberg lift" method that works too.

    I used the swing and dangle technique to fool a nice 22" Brown last year.
    Working downstream with a quartering downstream cast, the fish picked up the fly at the tail of the pool just as it reached the end of the swing and started to lift towards the surface.

    Both the Liesenring lift and the swing and dangle techniques emulate a fly coming off the bottom and getting ready to emerge.

    Regards,

    Tim C.

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  5. #4
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    Default Re: Help a new guy out

    I learned to nymph before the use of bobbers became popular. High-sticking and using what's now called the up-stream method
    Basically, you're making a tuck cast directly up-steam and then gathering your line at the same rate as it's flowing back at ya
    To see the strike, you're looking for your line to hesitate or straighten. However there's more than a little intuition involved.
    This works best during a hatch and in fairly fast water as often you're "lining" the fish
    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements. --- Horace Kephart

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  7. Default Re: Help a new guy out

    Thanks for the quick responses! I've done tenkara a bit and liked the simplicity so I would like to try and translate that into rod and reel, keeping gear and set up to a minimum (one fly, no indicator, etc.) I guess I will give it a go and see what happens!

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  9. #6

    Default Re: Help a new guy out

    As with others here, I predate many of the indicator and other modern schools of nymphing. And I still mostly prefer to cast a nymph upstream and let it sink as it comes back to me, Usually I stick with a single nymph, maybe with added weight.

    It really is an effective way to fish depending on the water. And the biggest advantage is that if fish start feeding on top, or I decide to fish a soft hackle wet or a streamer, all I have to do is change flies or maybe add one piece of tippet to my tippet ring and furled leader.

    When I use an indicator, it is generally something small and easily removed such as one of the New Zealand yarn indicators. Nothing wrong with bobbers except that I really don’t enjoy fishing them as much as the other techniques.

    Just do what you enjoy doing and the fish will come.

    Don

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    Default Re: Help a new guy out

    Welcome to the site.
    Applauds to your intended methods.

    ..... pc

  11. #8

    Default Re: Help a new guy out

    Quote Originally Posted by letthewookiewin View Post
    I have been reading up on nymph fishing, the different styles, and whatnot. I have a question that does not seem to be answered anywhere. Is it possible to nymph the same way without an indicator (not high sticking) as you would with one?

    It seems that was the old school way of doing it. I don't want to get into the debate, I am merely curious if it can be done effectively and maybe some tips for doing so.
    It depends on what you mean by "the same way." Strictly speaking, when fishing an indicator, there is SLACK between the indicator and the rod tip so that the indicator can move without drag from the rod tip or the fly line drag between the indicator and the rod. So most of the time or much of the time, the line between the indicator and the rod tip is MENDED to allow the indicator to float DRAG FREE. The take of the fish is telegraphed by indicator movement. So mending line is an inherent part of indicator fishing. The take is detected visually and the indicator is treated much like a dry fly.

    Plus in indicator nymphing the fly(ies) is(are) at set depth so indicator nymphing keeps the flies at a set depth of the top RATHER THAN a set distance above the bottom. So a relatively consistent water depth is better for indicator nymphing.

    In tight line nymphing without an indicator, the take of the fish is telegraphed by movement of the line of leader and so the take must be felt by the or seen by the angler. The line is NOT mended but rather is followed downstream by the rod tip, keeping the leader and line OFF OF THE WATER to prevent drag. In some cases the line is off the water but is under tension and the fly is "led" (minimally dragged) downstream by the leader or fly line. The strike is either felt or detected by a slight twitch in the visible "sighter" which is a section of elevated leader between the rod tip and the water.

    So I would say that they are fundamentally different techniques. The lack of mending in tight line nymphing would be an obvious difference. The method of strike detection is another difference.

    Often the same water can be fished with either method BUT that does not mean they are the "same way" of nymphing in my opinion. I would say the closer the angler is to the water being fished, the shallower the water, the more irregular the bottom structure, the more the depth varies over the drift lane = the more optimum it is for tight line nymphing. The proximity of the water being fished allows the angler to keep the line OFF OF THE WATER which is mandatory for tight line nymphing.

    The indicator method can fish waters that cannot be fished by tight line. Any fishable water that is too far for the leader/fly line to be OFF OF THE WATER cannot be fished with the tight line method. For example long distances are best fished with and indicator.

    Certain types of deeper and faster flows are best fished with an indicator. With an indicator, split shot weights can be added to get the fly down and suspended by the indicator more quickly. In deep and fast flows the fly line and leader will move downstream so fast that the fly cannot get into the zone before drag occurs with the tight line method. Even when casting the tight line method directly upstream or up and across, if the fly cannot get down fast enough so the fly is "in the zone" for a reasonable length, that water is better fished with an indicator and split shot so a longer effective drift length is fished.

    With an indicator, the angler can roll cast stack mend into a far off drift lane or mend into a fast water lane.

    I addressed much of your question in this post:

    Nymphing post
    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

  12. #9

    Default Re: Help a new guy out

    Nymphing "naked" is how many of us learned to nymph before using indicators became popular. I still do it from time to time, but even though I know I'm a halfway decent nympher, I also know I'm much better at detecting takes when I use an indicator.

    I do have a friend who has made the commitment to nymphing naked. We give each other **** about it, but in the end neither of us cares one way or the other what the other guy uses. He's the best fisherman I know, though, and routinely outfishes me even without a bobber.

  13. #10

    Default Re: Help a new guy out

    I learned to nymph with a bobber but now rarely use it. I also drift for salmon and steelhead without one too, kinda similar. The bobber does have it's uses though.

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