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  1. #21

    Default Re: Taking the temp of the water in a mountain stream

    Fish move for the food and the food hatches or moves at different temps. If you focus on H2O temps for the food and not specifically the fish you will be well ahead of the game.

    Tail waters are very cold and fish are wickedly active. At 70 F things start to stress the trout dramatically. Typically that will put a hoot owl restriction into place.

    Over-thinking might be too harsh to say as thinking is always good. But I think you will get alot more bang for the buck starting on other issues for your progressive learning curve.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Rappahanock, Potomac and Fingerlakes Region
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Taking the temp of the water in a mountain stream

    Oh I think that I have done about all the thinking on this point that I will, lol. Thanks !

  3. #23

    Default Re: Taking the temp of the water in a mountain stream

    Quote Originally Posted by City Rat View Post
    Ok, I have to admit to unintentionally leaving a key bit out of the original post, i.e. "...that trout really become active in mountain streams where I will be fishing once the temperature of the water hits 40 degrees for 4 consecutive days..." After digging into my class materials further the 40 degrees for 4 days actually refers to when the mayflies will usually begin hatching here and THEREFORE that is why the trout really become active... Yeah I know a key detail. At any rate I also found a blog post from the guy who wrote the book and gave the class on the same point: Mayfly Nymph Blog by Harry Murray at Murray's Fly Shop
    Harry is a well known fly fisher and I will file this information away.

    Thanks.
    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

  4. #24

    Default Re: Taking the temp of the water in a mountain stream

    Quote Originally Posted by irideaduck View Post
    I don't own a thermometer. I was out last spring with one of the members of the US fly fishing team. The first thing that morning we did was measure the water temperature. With the temperature being on the colder side he said the fish are most likely going to be in slower/deeper water and fishing would be slow. We caught a few fish and broke for an early lunch. Going from memory, temperatures by noon has risen some 8 deg F. We were still fishing the slower water. A few hours later the temperature was up some 12-14 deg F (mid to high 50's) from the morning and we were catching the fish in the faster water.

    The point of my post was that we should expect to find fish in different areas of the river based upon the different water temperatures.
    Were the members Devin Olsen and Lance Egan?
    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Taking the temp of the water in a mountain stream

    Quote Originally Posted by silver creek View Post
    Were the members Devin Olsen and Lance Egan?
    Silver ... Yes my wife and I hired Devin Olsen for the day as our guide. I showed up to the parking lot that day with 21 questions all listed out. Devin worked through all of them that day and added a bunch more topics that wasn't even smart enough to know to ask. Measuring the water temperature wasn't on my list.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    PNW--College Place
    Posts
    248

    Default Re: Taking the temp of the water in a mountain stream

    I was out fishing for the first time in over a month. Back in February the weather was still mild and that last day I caught two fish. I went back to those same spots and this time I remembered to bring my thermometer and wouldn't you know it, 40 degrees. And I knew it was cold by the way my waders felt and how much colder the water felt to my hand. I fished for a bit longer and didn't catch anything, nor any bites. I kept saying to myself, "the water is too cold", though I didn't really know. I'm still learning...


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