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  1. #1
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    Default Favorite knot for this saltwater application?

    OK, you have tied on a new 80# tarpon shock tippet to your class tippet. Now, what knot do you use to tie a fly on to the 80# tippet?
    "I hear voices, they tell me to go fishing"

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Manning, S. C. (formerly MD)
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    Default Re: Favorite knot for this saltwater application?

    I've never fished for Tarpon, but used to tie the flies for several guides. I know some guides used different types of connections.

    Sometimes a loop was used, while at others times a snell to the hook shank was used.

    When I tied flies that were to be snelled, the front section of the hook shank was left bare.

    I have used both for fishing with heavy tippets & other saltwater species, just have never had the opportunity to fish for Tarpon.

    Try these:

    Tarpon Fly Fishing Loop Knot Instructions by Cayman Islands Bonefishing Guide.

    How to snell a hook or snell knot a saltyshores how to | Saltyshores.com
    Remember, no one likes to be behind the big truck, but that's better than being under it!

  3. #3

    Default Re: Favorite knot for this saltwater application?

    We use 100# bite tippet, and a loop knot. Its a modified Lefty's Loop. We tie it just as you would tie the Lefty's Loop, but...here is the modification....ony wrap the tag end once around the line above the loop (only 180 degrees), and then back down through the overhand knot-loop. The trick is to lube the line very well, and keep the tag line above the loop as you pull the tag end to tighten. It doesn't seem like its enough to hold, but we've landed Tarpon to 200 lb, and its never slipped for us.
    Homer

    There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm. ~Patrick F. McManus, Never Sniff a Gift Fish, 1979

    Anger is like peeing in your pants: everyone can see it, but only you can feel it. ~Jeff Yalden

    Remember: The winner gets to write the history books.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Favorite knot for this saltwater application?

    GB,

    If you are not using straight 60# or something for a leader and are using a class tippet, the most important thing about the connection to the hook is that it does not slip. Even if your 80 pound bite tippet is only a 50% knot it is still at 40 lbs breaking strength.

    Whether you use a Lefty Loop, a clinch knot or snell, it's important with the thick line to insure it doesn't slip. To that end, (being a scrawny old man) I use a hook ring or improvised method to firmly hold the hook, pliers in one hand for the tag end and my other hand for the standing line.

    As you can see from that video, snelling hooks is an excellent way to attach them, particularly those with upturned eyes. On the old classic tarpon flies with straight eyed mustad hooks, we didn't go through the eye when snelling with 100# mason hard.

    What the video didn't point out is that when snelling, you have to remember that the tag AND the STANDING line must BOTH be covered by the wraps.

    It is possible when "snelling" through the eye to wrap it with the wrong part of the circle of line and have it look pretty when you cinch it up. But it will fall apart sooner or later - probably not until you have the fish of a lifetime on.
    http://www.miterclamp.com/Images/N_Amer_FF.jpg Cheers, Jim

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Favorite knot for this saltwater application?

    GB,

    Sorry I didn't answer your question, but I didn't have any pictures and what I use for tarpon is a no-slip loop similar to the Lefty Loop but a modification of it that I've been using for about 2 1/2 years and am now very confident with since it has been proven itself on large tarpon and much smaller saifish as well as a lot of very strenuous manual break tests.

    Those comments above were not meant for you, by the way, GB, but for guys not familiar with salt water, bite tippets etc. Only this knot itself might be of interest to you, and perhaps a few others here.

    The Lefty Loop is a great knot, but I am paranoid about picking up bay grass and other stuff so I do it differently and it is complicated to explain. But far easier for me to do than the Orvis knot. It's odd, but some knots I can only tie with the hook in my right hand and others only with the hook in my left hand. With the Orvis knot, I can never remember it for one thing, and when I look at the animations, they are holding the hook in the wrong hand and I can never figure how to switch it. Besides I am one hand short for that knot I'm afraid.

    Instead of a single overhand I start with a double like a surgeon's loop 6 or so inches up and snub it enough to make the 2 little loops that stick up on each end like a figure 8. I then pass the end through the hook eye and they through the two little loops following the same path as the standing line. I always keep these little loops facing up not down from here on. I slide the figure eight right up to the hook eye. This way, when complete, the loop is not gargantuan.

    I now have the standing line and the main line parallel and I squeeze the two flat right next to the the figure 8 loop away from the fly. In my case, the tag end will always be away from me because of the direction I always go when tying a surgeon's loop. If someone else is doing it it may be towards them.

    I now slightly spread the main and tag lines slightly between thumb and forfinger , keeping them both in the same plane without twists. I then wrap the tag around the main line going AWAY from me as it crosses the top of the main line. If the tag were on my side of the main line (again, hook in left hand) I would wrap towards me as the tag goes over the top of the main line. I would wrap it 3 1/4 times then pass the tag between the standing and main line coming up from the bottom and then directly through the two little loops at the ends of the figure 8 towards the fly.

    Then I cinch up the figure 8 portion of the knot while holding onto the original two parallel and horizontal line coming out the figure 8 loop on the side away from the fly.

    Now I cinch it up with a hook ring (or improvisation) pliers and the other hand. The bite tippet, if you are doing the IGFA thing is always put onto the fly first, then the class tippet is attached to it. What you wind up with is pictured below, tied with 60 lb flluoro. The standing line winds up running very straight into the loop, and the tag will not pick up any ****. If the wraps are not done in the direction I indicated , then the knot is what will look like **** and probably be **** too.

    Since neither my buddy Apple or I have ever seen or heard of it, he dubbed it the Cnut loop in keeping with the double nut squeeze, leader to fly line connection. I have bent up the tag to make the knot orientation more obvious.














    http://www.miterclamp.com/Images/N_Amer_FF.jpg Cheers, Jim

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Favorite knot for this saltwater application?

    For me, its simple. A 3-turn Uni-knot. Done. Never had one slip or fail. Tarpon to 150 pounds.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Favorite knot for this saltwater application?

    Thanks everyone! WJC, I'm going to have to study and think about that one. Probably easy to tie after having gone through the process a few times. Thanks again. I'm off to OZ for a couple of months, then to the Cook Islands mid-January to try for some of those giant bones. February is NZ for trout.
    "I hear voices, they tell me to go fishing"

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Favorite knot for this saltwater application?

    I'm off to OZ for a couple of months, then to the Cook Islands mid-January to try for some of those giant bones. February is NZ for trout
    You got me in the envy mood, GB. That's half a bucket full of a bucket list you got there.

    Another good loop (which you probably know, but others may not) that's easy to tie with heavy (to 300 lb test mono) is a jam loop using two surgeons - which winds up with the tag facing forward parallel and touching the main line.

    First surgeon snugged enough to form the "figure 8" looking thing, pass the tag through the hook eye and through the two "8" loops same way as the line exiting each end. Snug the surgeon tight and slide to the hook eye. Tie another surgeon's around the standing line and remember which way you tied that surgeon, and work it toward the hook eye for whatever size loop you want then snug.

    The ears on the first surgeon will be either on the top or on the bottom. The ears on the second surgeon will also be on the top or the bottom.

    With both lines between the two surgeons parallel.....



    make sure the two "figure 8" loops that will come together when the knot is cinched will be >> one on top, and the other on the bottom. This way when the knot is cinched down, the "loops" on the two "figure 8's" will mesh together tightly.



    If not, undo the second "figure 8" and re-do it so the adjacent middle loops will "miter" together as you can see they will in the picture above when the two lines between them are (and stay) parallel.

    Cinch tightly with pliers on the tag, main line in the other hand and hook securely fastened to something.

    These pics are all with 300 lb mono for clarity so they will not cinch up as tightly as with smaller diameter bite tippet.







    That last pic above shows the typical criss cross you get with a surgeon loop. That has been my standard loop for large diameter bite tippet for a long time until I modified the Lefty loop so the tag exits the knot the opposite way the one above does. My buddy was using the above loop knot when he caught his largest fish, a 970 lb bluefin not far from the Elbow off Bimini years ago.

    Have a great time GB and don't forget to take a backup camera. We need some good pics to drool over this winter.
    http://www.miterclamp.com/Images/N_Amer_FF.jpg Cheers, Jim

  9. Default Re: Favorite knot for this saltwater application?

    The Lefty Loop is a great knot, but I am paranoid about picking up bay grass and other stuff so I do it differently and it is complicated to explain. But far easier for me to do than the Orvis knot. It's odd, but some knots I can only tie with the hook in my right hand and others only with the hook in my left hand. With the Orvis knot, I can never remember it for one thing, and when I look at the animations, they are holding the hook in the wrong hand and I can never figure how to switch it. Besides I am one hand short for that knot I'm afraid.
    !!!..<<..Usman Gee..>>..!!!

  10. #10

    Default Re: Favorite knot for this saltwater application?

    Canoeman knot. Easy to tie and strong and as can be
    Less likey, more green dots
    BrookFieldAngler.com

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