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  1. #1
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    Default Grain Weight to "Rod weight"

    Hoping someone can set my strange confused head straight. Im shopping reels, for a Sage bass rod, its the bluegill series, has a 230 gr line. What is the correct or close "weight" that im looking for in reels. I have only found one chart and it says that its an 8 wt, however I thought the bluegill series was more down in the 6/7 neighborhood.
    "When you do things right, people wont be sure you've done anything at all."

    Storm Drain Bonefisher

  2. #2
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    Manning, S. C. (formerly MD)
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    Default Re: Grain Weight to "Rod weight"

    I would think that a reel that both balances with the rod weight wise, and provides adequate capacity for both line & backing would be what you should be looking for, not necessarily a reel that is sold for a particular line weight.

    For example, I have an Okuma 11/12 Integrity reel on one of my 10 wt's. It's slightly heavier than the 9/10 wt version, but I like the balance better. I don't need the extra capacity for what I use it for, primarily Striped Bass fishing, the 9/10 wt version would have had plenty as well, but it's nice to know I have the extra backing should I ever need it.

    In your case, perhaps you should go to a shop with your rod & see what feels best to you, in reels made for 7 to 9 wts. Bass fishing reels, don't usually need large capacities, but perhaps at some point you may have the opportunity to use the same rod & reel for other species that could require a bit more.

    Just a suggestion!
    Remember, no one likes to be behind the big truck, but that's better than being under it!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Grain Weight to "Rod weight"

    Yeah, Im good friends with the owner of the local shop I frequent, so pairing a reel wouldnt be an issue. I plan on the time being for using it in streams for smallmouth and smaller carp. However, in the grand scheme of things I want to move to Florida, and wouldnt mind throwing it at smaller saltwater fish but who knows if I will ever get there. Even if I do, i have an 8wt and wouldnt mind a 10+ ha
    "When you do things right, people wont be sure you've done anything at all."

    Storm Drain Bonefisher

  4. #4
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    Nov 2008
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    Parlin, NJ / Staten Island, NY
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    Default Re: Grain Weight to "Rod weight"

    That's a fast action, short rod 7'11" I believe. It's designed to shoot line in tight spaces. That's the reason behind the heavy gr weight recomendation. I'm not sure how they came up with the "Bluegill" designation since I've never targeted them with with anything more than a 5wt. 230gr puts it somewhere between a 7 and an 8wt. Fishing a short rod in the saltwater will be a challenge. There will be alot of stripping and false casting involved. A 7'11" rod won't be able to lift as much line as a 9' rod.
    The best way to a fisherman's heart is through his fly.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Grain Weight to "Rod weight"

    Right, but if im in a marsh in my kayak, i probably wont be making long casts. If i need it, I have a 9's 8wt to chuck stuff.
    "When you do things right, people wont be sure you've done anything at all."

    Storm Drain Bonefisher

  6. #6

    Default Re: Grain Weight to "Rod weight"

    Quote Originally Posted by stl_geoff View Post
    Hoping someone can set my strange confused head straight. Im shopping reels, for a Sage bass rod, its the bluegill series, has a 230 gr line. What is the correct or close "weight" that im looking for in reels. I have only found one chart and it says that its an 8 wt, however I thought the bluegill series was more down in the 6/7 neighborhood.
    Standard line weights for rods are as follows:
    4wt = 120 gr
    5wt = 140 gr
    6wt = 160 gr
    7wt = 185 gr
    8wt = 210 gr
    9wt = 240 gr

    Most grain weights are measured off of a 30 foot weight for each respective rod. I use Rio Gold on my 4 and 6 weight rods. The 30 foot weight for a 4 weight Rio Gold is 126 grains, while the 6 weight is 168 grains. I doubt that your rod would be rated this way. I use a 231 grain Rio Clouser on my 8 weight rod, which is a half line size heavier than a standard line. I have accidentally hooked bluegill on smaller flies while fishing for bass with my 8 weight and have thrown them backwards 60 feet on my backcast, not realizing they took the fly.

    Having said this, I am assuming the Sage rod you are looking at has specs for the total head weight. If this is the case, 230 grains would correspond to a 6 weight rod, which would make more sense. The 290, 330, and 390 grain rods would be 7, 8, and 9 weight rods respectively. This would make the bluegill rod a 6 weight, smallmouth a 7, largemouth an 8, and peacock bass a 9 weight. This sounds more in-line with what I would fish if I had to target each individual species.

    I believe a 4-6 or 5-7 weight reel will suit you just fine. You are using a rod that is less than 8 feet, so it is tournament legal. Because of the reduced length, and the addition of a fighting butt, you will probably need a lighter reel if you feel that it is necessary to balance the combo. Depending on your price range, I'd recommend a Ross CLA or Evolution LT, Nautilus FWX, or any of the Lamson reels between a Konic up to Lightspeed. Out of these reels, the Konic is the only reel that is cast instead of machined from bar stock aluminum. The FWX, Evolution LT, and Lightspeed will be your lightest options.

    I'd call or email Sage just to double check my theory, but I can't imagine a using blue gill rod that needs an 8 weight line. My go to blue gill rod is my small stream trout combo: an 8 foot, 4 weight that casts everything up to small poppers and chernobyl ants with ease.
    Last edited by chicagojohn; 01-10-2012 at 10:41 PM.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Grain Weight to "Rod weight"

    Quote Originally Posted by stl_geoff View Post
    Right, but if im in a marsh in my kayak, i probably wont be making long casts. If i need it, I have a 9's 8wt to chuck stuff.
    Absolutely, I have a 7'11" 7wt that I use when I'm wading in the muck and pulling Bass out of the lily pads. The shorter rod helps keep me out of the trees overhead. My yak is 12' so I don't use anything shorter than a 9' rod. The length helps if I have to swim the fish around the yak.
    The best way to a fisherman's heart is through his fly.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Grain Weight to "Rod weight"

    Quote Originally Posted by chicagojohn View Post
    Standard line weights for rods are as follows:
    4wt = 120 gr
    5wt = 140 gr
    6wt = 160 gr
    7wt = 185 gr
    8wt = 210 gr
    9wt = 240 gr

    Most grain weights are measured off of a 30 foot weight for each respective rod. I use Rio Gold on my 4 and 6 weight rods. The 30 foot weight for a 4 weight Rio Gold is 126 grains, while the 6 weight is 168 grains. I doubt that your rod would be rated this way. I use a 231 grain Rio Clouser on my 8 weight rod, which is a half line size heavier than a standard line. I have accidentally hooked bluegill on smaller flies while fishing for bass with my 8 weight and have thrown them backwards 60 feet on my backcast, not realizing they took the fly.

    Having said this, I am assuming the Sage rod you are looking at has specs for the total head weight. If this is the case, 230 grains would correspond to a 6 weight rod, which would make more sense. The 290, 330, and 390 grain rods would be 7, 8, and 9 weight rods respectively. This would make the bluegill rod a 6 weight, smallmouth a 7, largemouth an 8, and peacock bass a 9 weight. This sounds more in-line with what I would fish if I had to target each individual species.

    I believe a 4-6 or 5-7 weight reel will suit you just fine. You are using a rod that is less than 8 feet, so it is tournament legal. Because of the reduced length, and the addition of a fighting butt, you will probably need a lighter reel if you feel that it is necessary to balance the combo. Depending on your price range, I'd recommend a Ross CLA or Evolution LT, Nautilus FWX, or any of the Lamson reels between a Konic up to Lightspeed. Out of these reels, the Konic is the only reel that is cast instead of machined from bar stock aluminum. The FWX, Evolution LT, and Lightspeed will be your lightest options.

    I'd call or email Sage just to double check my theory, but I can't imagine a using blue gill rod that needs an 8 weight line. My go to blue gill rod is my small stream trout combo: an 8 foot, 4 weight that casts everything up to small poppers and chernobyl ants with ease.
    This makes perfect sense. Thanks. I was trying all my different reels out last night on the rod to see what fit and felt the best for balancing it. my Sage 3850cf definitly balanced it out nicely and wasnt too heavy, the 1680 I have was about the right size for it, but was WAY to heavy. The reel I was looking at getting is about the same as the 3850 so Im going to go with it.


    Quote Originally Posted by swirlchaser View Post
    Absolutely, I have a 7'11" 7wt that I use when I'm wading in the muck and pulling Bass out of the lily pads. The shorter rod helps keep me out of the trees overhead. My yak is 12' so I don't use anything shorter than a 9' rod. The length helps if I have to swim the fish around the yak.
    Yup, thats true. Granted all my saltwater fly fishing visions are just assumptions at this point. it could be one of those deals where after doing it the first time I say hmm, I NEED a 9' 10wt. haha. i did that with carp, after landing a monster on a 5wt, went and bought an 8 the next day.
    "When you do things right, people wont be sure you've done anything at all."

    Storm Drain Bonefisher

  9. #9

    Default Re: Grain Weight to "Rod weight"

    AFTMA Fly line weight ratings

    Might be too late but this is good to save in your favorites!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    St. Louis, MO
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    Default Re: Grain Weight to "Rod weight"

    No, thats good to have. I'll keep it around
    "When you do things right, people wont be sure you've done anything at all."

    Storm Drain Bonefisher

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