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Thread: What do I really need in a fly reel?

  1. #11

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Get yourself an Okuma Sierra off the auction site for $30~ and be set. No reason to even think about a higher priced reel.

  2. #12

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    I would buy Okuma's SLV's all day long. They have a great drag that can stop trains if needed, look great and you can get them for $50 bucks or less! If anyone says a $300 reel is better I dare them to prove it!

  3. Likes itchmesir liked this post
  4. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    the allen ats reel at 99 bucks is hard to beat/
    fully machined, smooth drag and an awesome
    lifetime warranty.
    the guys at allen do it right
    ATS Reel Series - Allen Fly Fishing Store

    casey


    ARFE

  5. Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Cabelas Wind River is $20. Good reel.

  6. #15
    Join Date
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    Oregon - Willamette Valley
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    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    THe Okuma SLV is the reel I would use if I wanted a very good reel that was quality and reasonably priced. It is a winner. I know a guy uses them to catch big steelhead.
    However, I am a lover of beauty and certain fly reels make my knees weak. The only thing I love more is my dearest wife who always makes my knees weak.
    Get the SLV. It's a really good reel.
    Paul

  7. #16
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    Apr 2013
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    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Can I piggyback off this thread with a related question and ask how important a sealed drag is versus one that isn't sealed? For example: the Ross Flyrise versus the Lamson Konic? The reels would be for a 4wt and 5wt rods.

  8. #17
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    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Quote Originally Posted by medic29358 View Post
    What I'm really looking for is a reliable trout reel for my 5wt rod. I doesn't seem like I need super strong drag, so I think I've decided on a click/pawl reel. When it comes down to it, is there really a difference between a $99 and a $300 reel. Or will any reel to the trick? It seems the rod is where I should spend a little more. I am taking into consideration made in the USA vs. overseas. Sure I'd like to buy an Able, but that's a lot to shell out right now.
    Instead of giving you a long and drawn out response, I will narrow my answer to four points.

    1. Look at the machining. Are the tolerances tight? Does the spool wobble when it spins?
    2. How important is the finish to you. You really want something that is going to last.
    3. Drag system? Do you really need a disk drag? Regardless, you need something that is smooth starting. If you are going to have a long drawn out fight with Homie on a regular basis, you may want a disk drag.
    4. Is made in USA really important to you? Will an offshore made reel do the job?


    Good luck with your search.

    Dennis

  9. Likes jaybo41, kelkay liked this post
  10. #18
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    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Quote Originally Posted by ts47 View Post
    Can I piggyback off this thread with a related question and ask how important a sealed drag is versus one that isn't sealed? For example: the Ross Flyrise versus the Lamson Konic? The reels would be for a 4wt and 5wt rods.
    Where I sit is that multiple factors are in play:

    1. Owner serviceability or Manufacturer serviceability
    2. Maintenance or little to no maintenance.
    3. Price/budget
    4. Reel and specifically drag design
    5. Manufacturer warranty.

    I've come to appreciate reels that I can service myself--not saying this is right for everyone. Replacing springs/pawls or getting another cork drag plate are a convenience as opposed to sending a reel back for service and or replacement. This can often be done in the field if parts are on hand or possibly by going to a local fly shop. Some reels I own there is little more that I can do but to send them back for service and that's OK too because the manufacturers I've chosen offer repair/service. Replacement is OK too but if you're on a trip and aren't don't have a backup reel to use this could be a problem.

    Of the two you mentioned, I know that my local shop who carries Lamson recommends them because they're pretty well serviceable in a fly shop. I've seen guys bring their Lamsons in and they replaced the bearing within a few minutes.
    ~*~Leave only your footprints~*~

  11. #19
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    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rip Tide View Post
    With a light trout reel, you're not looking for a drag that will stop a truck. You only need to set the drag strong enough to prevent backlash.
    What's important is that the reel "starts up" smoothly without any jerking to protect the tippet.

    I use "primitive" drags on all my fresh water reels. Spring/pawl and the Medalist type brakes.
    If you've got them set right... it's all you need.

    This is the reel that I've been using this week

    So yes! Old (and I do mean OLD) addage is you set your drag for half the break strength of your tippet. Point being is the line going through the guides adds a hell of a lot more.

    This is really true with 2handers. One of the reasons guys can use dragless reels like the Hardy's. They can be knuckle busters with a hot fish, but that can be more than half the fun.
    When wealth is lost, nothing is lost; when health is lost, something is lost; when character is lost, all is lost. - Billy Graham"

  12. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Quote Originally Posted by jaybo41 View Post
    Where I sit is that multiple factors are in play:

    1. Owner serviceability or Manufacturer serviceability
    2. Maintenance or little to no maintenance.
    3. Price/budget
    4. Reel and specifically drag design
    5. Manufacturer warranty.

    I've come to appreciate reels that I can service myself--not saying this is right for everyone. Replacing springs/pawls or getting another cork drag plate are a convenience as opposed to sending a reel back for service and or replacement. This can often be done in the field if parts are on hand or possibly by going to a local fly shop. Some reels I own there is little more that I can do but to send them back for service and that's OK too because the manufacturers I've chosen offer repair/service. Replacement is OK too but if you're on a trip and aren't don't have a backup reel to use this could be a problem.

    Of the two you mentioned, I know that my local shop who carries Lamson recommends them because they're pretty well serviceable in a fly shop. I've seen guys bring their Lamsons in and they replaced the bearing within a few minutes.
    My situation is this. I just ordered a pair of rods/reels (4 & 5 wt). The reel I ordered was the Ross Flyrise. When I received it, I realized they were not sealed drags and they seem to have a fair amount of plastic. While the plastic may not be that big a deal, the open drag concerns me. Had I realized this up front, I likely would have ordered the Lamson Konic II. I may even go for the Lamson Guru for the 5wt. They both have a sealed drag. I can exchange the reels. So, I'm trying to decide if the sealed drag is worth the hassle of return shipping and waiting to get them back. I do use my gear. I have set them down, not in the mud, but on a soft or sandy shoreline, do let them get wet and/or dirty on occasion, but otherwise take care of my gear. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
    Last edited by ts47; 05-21-2013 at 03:28 PM.

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