Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  14
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29

Thread: What do I really need in a fly reel?

  1. #21

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Nothing wrong with the Orvis reel, I just like the Allens better. Its on my 3wt which hardly gets used anymore. I like my 4wt and use it almost all the time.
    Okiemountaineer

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    On a trout stream/Suburban Pittsburgh
    Posts
    3,358
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    My experience with Ross is limited to the Evolution LT so I can't directly comment on the Flystart's durability. What I can say is that I'm nearly certain the Lamson's up to a point all use the same drag system. If memory serves me, the larger game drags were slightly different and the newest Lamsons may also differ. The drag on the on the Lamsons that I fished performed flawlessly for trout and Lake Run Steelhead. FWIW, the Evolution LT is a fine reel in its own right.

    If you have concerns or reservations about it now, it's best to take the time and get what you want.

    As another option, the Galvan Rush 4 or 5 are just a little above your price range of the Guru but I'm confident you won't have reservations or problems with the drag in a Galvan.
    ~*~Leave only your footprints~*~

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Albuquerque
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    I have the Guru II and it's a pretty sweet reel...light, smooth and pretty hassle free. Just make sure if you do pick up the Guru, be sure it has the red bearing/clutch...as it was an improvement from the previous models when they were changed to corrosion resistant one. I really do think your gonna love this reel, Lamson really prides themselves on the fact it has so few parts, it's very simple and virtually maintence free. I've had zero issues with mine, although I am careful with my gear but it has seen numerous submersions and accidental knocks against boulders and what not. Very durable little reel. I'd say go for it

  4. Likes kelkay liked this post
  5. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    MD Suburbs of DC
    Posts
    2,553

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Quote Originally Posted by jaybo41 View Post
    My experience with Ross is limited to the Evolution LT so I can't directly comment on the Flystart's durability. What I can say is that I'm nearly certain the Lamson's up to a point all use the same drag system. If memory serves me, the larger game drags were slightly different and the newest Lamsons may also differ. The drag on the on the Lamsons that I fished performed flawlessly for trout and Lake Run Steelhead. FWIW, the Evolution LT is a fine reel in its own right.

    If you have concerns or reservations about it now, it's best to take the time and get what you want.

    As another option, the Galvan Rush 4 or 5 are just a little above your price range of the Guru but I'm confident you won't have reservations or problems with the drag in a Galvan.
    Thanks (to everyone) for the comments. Your Ross Evolution LT has what I call an open drag like the Ross Flystart. When you pop the spool off, there is an opening in the drag assembly that "could" get grit into it. My question really is how concerned or careful do I need to be in keeping that from happening? And... Is it hard to deal with if it does happen?

    The Waterworks Lamson reels have a completely sealed drag system that attaches to the frame of the reel rather than the spool like with Ross. While I'm not that tough on my gear, I'm not all that careful either. My reels have been dunked, dropped on a soft or sandy shoreline, etc.

    Thanks for your thoughts!

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    On a trout stream/Suburban Pittsburgh
    Posts
    3,358
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    I've not had any issues with the EVO LT that I couldn't deal with in the field. I think I've had some grit in it and just gave it a quick rinse in the stream and blew out the water. Maybe not ideal but it worked on the water. Then gave it a good wipe down when I get back to home or camp and I'm good to go.
    ~*~Leave only your footprints~*~

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    MD Suburbs of DC
    Posts
    2,553

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Quote Originally Posted by jaybo41 View Post
    I've not had any issues with the EVO LT that I couldn't deal with in the field. I think I've had some grit in it and just gave it a quick rinse in the stream and blew out the water. Maybe not ideal but it worked on the water. Then gave it a good wipe down when I get back to home or camp and I'm good to go.
    Thanks Jaybo! I decided the Ross Flyrise was just a little cheaper reel/s than what I wanted. The shop I bought them from allowed me to exchange the two reels and upgrade to a Lamson Konic II 1.5 for my 4wt rod and a Lamson Guru 2 for my 5 wt rod. Both on the Lamsons have sealed drags, larger arbors and a better build (I think) without adding to the weight.

    I appreciate your input!

  8. #27

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Lamson reels do not have sealed drags. Removal of the spool reveals the one-way clutch bearing that you can reach with your fingers to turn over to convert reel winding direction. If you can see and touch it, it is not "sealed". It is better protected with the spool on of course but very few reels are actually really sealed.

    Lamson products, though intelligent in many ways, feature a too wide, too shallow aspect ratio that makes retrieving lots of line counter-intuitive. Too much attention is required to regain line uniformly risking uneven build up thus pillar jamming. An exception would be their new Speedster, designed to address this issue but it is part of the US made more expensive line of product than the lower end imports.

    (This is the second time today alone that I have written this and obviously not everyone shares my perspective. Just be aware of this aspect ratio design element before purchase.)

  9. Likes oarfish liked this post
  10. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Western Montana
    Posts
    4,614

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    Quote Originally Posted by ts47 View Post
    Thanks (to everyone) for the comments. Your Ross Evolution LT has what I call an open drag like the Ross Flystart. When you pop the spool off, there is an opening in the drag assembly that "could" get grit into it. My question really is how concerned or careful do I need to be in keeping that from happening? And... Is it hard to deal with if it does happen?

    The Waterworks Lamson reels have a completely sealed drag system that attaches to the frame of the reel rather than the spool like with Ross. While I'm not that tough on my gear, I'm not all that careful either. My reels have been dunked, dropped on a soft or sandy shoreline, etc.

    Thanks for your thoughts!
    The Ross Evolution is a self-lubricating and maintenance-free system. They recommend simply running clean water over it to clean and grit away. With the lifetime warranty I don't worry about this at all.

  11. #29

    Default Re: What do I really need in a fly reel?

    The "real" Ross Reels like the very fine Evolution LT are not to be confused with the Ross Worldwide low-end imported products. I don't have one but we have a few older Ross reels and they are very solid, quality reels. We also have some old Lamsons, pre Waterworks acquisition of the brand name that are very serviceable if not elegant. And, as others have said, Allen Trout II's are good looking and highly regarded.

    There are plenty of very serviceable Korean made reels under assorted brand names like Redington and Albright that get the job done. There is just no reason to settle for fundamental design flaws when there is such a proliferation of reels out there. If we were talking about saltwater flats reels then we are down to a much smaller assortment of reels but for a 5-weight trout rod, I am more concerned about tuned balance and aesthetics and have pretty much settled on the reasonably priced Hardy Ultralite DD's and Nautilus FWX's though I am going to experiment on another maker soon.

  12. Likes oarfish liked this post
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •