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  1. Default Re: Ross Reels and differences

    For fresh water trout it's a vanity purchase - go with whichever will please you most

  2. Likes WNCtroutstalker liked this post
  3. #12

    Default Ross Reels and differences

    I own the Evolution R and the Evolution LTX and I actually like the LTX better and it is a few bucks cheaper. I find the drag feels smoother to me and I like the more traditional drag knob.

    Over the years I have found Ross reels to be foolproof!

    Let me also add a nice company with some great folks working there


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. Likes sweetandsalt, cooutlaw liked this post
  5. #13
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Ross Reels and differences

    Quote Originally Posted by original cormorant View Post
    For fresh water trout it's a vanity purchase - go with whichever will please you most
    MAYBE..... if an angler fishes mostly tiny streams or small freestones and tailwaters perhaps they would be fine with lesser winches.....but all trout, particularly some of the Western Large River inhabitants, are not guppies, and will test a 5 or 6 wt reel with a drag often to it's backing. Even if they are the "freshwater" fish . We just covered this a bit in a personal best post...of a lovely fish caught by another forum member here:

    My trout of a life time

    Unless your habitat is solely small trout waters - don't assume all a "trout reel" needs to be is a line holder. Now if you only fish or have ever only fished in habitats of sub 20" fish, then sure, you can opt for click and pawl and likely be ok....otherwise....if your chucking 7" articulated streamers on a 6-7wt or blasting large double nymph rigs on big trout water...you might want to consider an upgrade from palming a rim.

  6. Likes sweetandsalt liked this post
  7. #14

    Default Re: Ross Reels and differences

    I have read the Ross Animas drag is not sealed. This is a concern and makes the LTX more inviting.

    The Ross LTX has some interesting colors. Leaning towards the Plantinum but the Black looks good too.

  8. #15
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    Default Re: Ross Reels and differences

    Quote Originally Posted by dipaoro View Post
    I have read the Ross Animas drag is not sealed. This is a concern and makes the LTX more inviting.

    The Ross LTX has some interesting colors. Leaning towards the Plantinum but the Black looks good too.
    Sounds like you've pretty much thought it through and made up your mind already. I don't think the forum can likely help much in choosing a preferred color for you though, as that is entirely your personal preference alone.

  9. #16
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    Default Re: Ross Reels and differences

    What is the significance of "sealed" drag? I have some older Ross reels: Gen 2 Cimmarons from early 2000's, original Evo's, and Evo LT's. All work fine even on pretty big trout. Are they sealed?

  10. #17

    Default Re: Ross Reels and differences

    Pick the Animas. It appears that it will balance your rod and make for a comfortable day of fishing. It also
    seems the reel is aesthetically pleasing to you. The spec's provided suggest the reel will do the job you have
    ascribed for the reel also. Spend the extra hundred on a back country French press for some fine stream side
    fresh coffee and your favorite pastry (or iced honeybun) !!

  11. #18

    Default Re: Ross Reels and differences

    Quote Originally Posted by wthorpe View Post
    What is the significance of "sealed" drag? I have some older Ross reels: Gen 2 Cimmarons from early 2000's, original Evo's, and Evo LT's. All work fine even on pretty big trout. Are they sealed?
    Wouldn’t say there’s anything significant about a sealed drag. Just more convenient in helping reduce the chance of salt, silt, sand getting between the discs, and messing with otherwise smooth startups. For me, startup inertia matters most with getting a big running fish on the reel without popping. Once on the reel, I use rod angles more than drag adjustment. Drag comes back into play only when I need to keep the rod high to get a long line off the water. If I play the angles well from the start, I don’t really need the drag much, even for big lahontans or carp.

    Having an unsealed drag is a pretty minor issue unless the reel gets a daily dunking in salty, silty, or muddy water. Even then, mainly only if the drag is set loose when dunking. Unsealed drags will work fine for decades of normal use. Helps to occasionally back off the drag and flush it out under the tap. None of those old Ross reels of yours are sealed. I have some old Ross gunnison reels from the early 90s that are also unsealed and still work just fine as my primary reels for trout, salmon, pike, and carp.

  12. #19

    Default Re: Ross Reels and differences

    I don't recall the name of my wife's retired old Ross but it is one with a twin conical drag assembley. I suppose it was adequate in its day until I did her a pre-trip favor. While checking out and preparing our tackle I gave her dry looking reel a couple of drops of light oil as I was lubing my own reels. Rigging up on the banks of a famed western river with PMD's emerging she inquired, "why can't I set my drag?" I subsequently learned that old Ross recommended not to lubricate as doing so could contaminate the exposed drag elements...my fault. Fortunately, I always pack extra reels.

    Sealed drags are not a necessity, even in the salt. However the stacked multi-element sealed module drag design is arguably the best and a new contemporary standard employed by our top reel designers/makers...Hatch, Abel, Ross and numerous more. They provide low start up inertia, smooth, precise and unfading incremental settings from 6X to tuna headroom and require little maintenance other than periodic rinsing...a little frustrating for an old reel lubricator.

    To add to cooutlaws wise commentary, I'll make two points. My trout fishing goes back to the reign of spring and pawl traditional reels and I caught many a large trout and salmon fishing them. I initially resisted the advent of saltwater drag type trout reels back in the early 1980's but did begin to experiment with them. Quickly I learned that employing a drag in conjunction with the palming rim I was landing trout a notable % faster than with only an over-run check. This yields shorter trout revival time and healthier release. Important. Secondly, price, aesthetics and personal preference aside, I also concur that the horizontally neutral balance of a rod and reel outfit is vital to a proper, comfortable to fish rig. Not so much during casting where it is irrelevant but while wading, standing, hunting, walking, waiting for the rise... Performance and design are all debatable but for me, proper balancing weight, capacity and match to the intent of the rod comes first and reel preference second.

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