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  1. #41
    mridenour Guest

    Default Re: Nice Quality Beginner Rod w/ Room to Grow

    Quote Originally Posted by alfordjo View Post
    Thanks for all the comments / suggestions.

    A small update:

    I have visited St Peters in Fort Collins.

    I have begun looking at used (thinking my dollars would go farther) but am extremely frightened by no warranty.

    I will let the forum know of my decision once it is made.

    Thanks again.

    Jonathan
    Buy new unless the used rod is a steal. A good warranty is worth the extra dollars spent on a new rod.

  2. Likes pszy22, shotgunfly, jaybo41, fly_guy12955 liked this post
  3. #42

    Default Re: Nice Quality Beginner Rod w/ Room to Grow

    Quote Originally Posted by turbineblade View Post
    Unless the fish are 70+ feet away and you can't cast to that distance because you spend your time "avoiding distance because it's pointless".

    Nearly every person I've heard say to work on accuracy >> distance can't cast long distances. What they totally miss is that the skill required to cast long distances and into the wind naturally develops good accuracy at short distances as a by-product. Show me one distance champion with poor accuracy at 30-50'.

    If the fish are far out, or (more importantly) you need to cast into the wind with large fly patterns (very common in SW and on big rivers like the Potomac here) -- distance is important. Learn it -- I am. I've found that my accuracy has become much better as I've stretched my distance out there.
    Maybe things are different in other environments and situations, but for me, fishing for trout in rivers here in Michigan, what counts is the ability to present one's fly in a convincing manner. Again personally speaking, I can't control my fly when it's too far away. I don't have any trouble making a 70' cast, I do have trouble getting a fish to take my fly that far away. I have much better luck fishing my side of the river, and keeping my fly under control.

    Of course, that's the nice thing about fishing. Different stroke for different folks. To the OP, try different stuff, figure out what works for you.


    The more you know, the less you need.

    Tenkara Fly Fishing

    Tenkara Fly Fishing Blog


    "People tend to get the politicians and the fishing tackle they deserve" - John Gierach, Fishing Bamboo

  4. #43

    Default Re: Nice Quality Beginner Rod w/ Room to Grow

    turbineblade
    what exactly are you fishing for on the potomac. I ask because I never have fished it. Smallies? LMB? Are those fish particular 'picky' about presentation in comparison to trout?

    Not trying to be smart. I just haven't made the journey to the potomac but might as I expand out from the valley rivers, streams and spring creeks.

    Thanks,
    C
    "...all snobbery is defensive..and as important as fishing seems, the most important thing about it is, it's just fishing."

    -- John Gierach

    Art: http://www.gravenfish.com

    My TU:
    http://massanuttentu.com

  5. #44
    turbineblade Guest

    Default Re: Nice Quality Beginner Rod w/ Room to Grow

    turbineblade
    what exactly are you fishing for on the potomac. I ask because I never have fished it. Smallies? LMB? Are those fish particular 'picky' about presentation in comparison to trout?
    One of the neat things about the tidal Potomac is you could potentially see or catch damn near anything, even species you cannot identify. Last year I caught a large Nile Tilapia in one of the feeder streams in a highly urban area.

    There are also Snakehead, but I've only landed one -- had hits from others though. A few people have reported redfish in deeper sections, American eels are around, and honestly nothing would surprise me.

    What are the typical species I'll target and/or that I'm likely to catch on any given day?

    Bluegill
    Pumpkinseed
    Redbreast sunfish
    LMB
    Blue catfish
    Carp
    Longnose gar
    Striped bass
    Yellow perch

    It's a pretty neat fishery, if you can stand the urban setting.

    Maybe things are different in other environments and situations, but for me, fishing for trout in rivers here in Michigan, what counts is the ability to present one's fly in a convincing manner.
    Absolutely -- no argument there. The same applies on the trout streams near here (about 1 hour west puts you into some great mountain streams and spring creeks).

    Fish here are usually holding on structure very temporarily, and often not at all. Many move in with the tide to feed, and then move out. I mostly fish tidal flats with sand/silt bottoms, where the tide will put the depth between literally 10" in spots, and 4-5' at low tide.....then at high tide the low spots might be 3' and the deep spots around 8-9'. Wind is often a factor, but not always. Water is often clear and it is VERY easy to spook the fish if you wade too closely.

    What I do is:

    1. Wade to within about 50-60' of spotted or suspected fish, or structure (kayak can get a little closer). Any closer and they usually spook and you might as well just move on.
    2. Use a 9-10' leader on calm days, 7-8' on windy days.
    3. Flies are often weighted for floating line, less so for my sink tip/int. lines
    4. Double hauling and casting to 60-70' is my normal casting distance...but this varies a lot day to day.
    5. Dead drifting is basically non-existent -- current is limited to tidal movement and wind....not like a trout stream at all.
    6. Mending isn't used, at least not in the general sense.

    Actually, for my areas I'd say fly pattern is the least important thing, and the ability to cast long leaders and heavy flies into the wind and for long distances is the single most applicable skill. In a lot of places you can't possibly sneak up on the fish any closer for shorter casts -- you're literally limited by how far you can stay back and still get a fly to your spots. And I don't always do this successfully . That's why it is do addictive. You can never master this.

    I've fished a lot of different species now in a pretty short period of time -- I am of the belief that the real Gods of fly fishing are the crazy Saltwater guys -- there is nothing more challenging than throwing a long line into insane winds to redfish/bones/stripers in shallow, clear waters. It's masochistic! Those guys can absolutely smoke me and my pathetic skills.

  6. #45

    Default Re: Nice Quality Beginner Rod w/ Room to Grow

    I just had loads of fun at St Peters Fly Shop in Fort Collins.

    They had me cast 3 rods - Sage VXP, Sage One and Scott A4.

    I bet every one can tell me which one I liked the best (and seemed to throw the best) - the Sage One.


    I also signed up for a 2 day clinic in a few weeks.

    The journey continues.

    Jonathan

  7. #46

    Default Re: Nice Quality Beginner Rod w/ Room to Grow

    Quote Originally Posted by beau moore View Post
    Freak,

    I assume you bought the Orvis Clearwater 5wt combo? I was thinking of this myself... What did you not like about the reel?
    Yes, bought the combo. The reel does the job, but it just overall cheaper quality. It take a little more maintenance then I would care for. I find myself having to clean it every 3rd time out. I tend to fish smaller stream with it and it gets "gritty" when reeling it.

    Quote Originally Posted by alfordjo View Post
    Freak,

    Did you purchase the 8wt because you wanted a larger rod or did the 5wt not perform for you?

    Thanks,

    Jonathan
    Like othesr have said, I just added the 8wt to fish bigger waters. I really prefer the 5wt, but it won't handle largemouth bass.

  8. Default Great St. Croixs out there....

    I'm new to fly fishing and have had great results casting a older 9' 5wt. St. Croix Reign. My friend has the Premier model and finds it to perform really well for trout. However I believe a St. Croix Legend might be a great step up and you can find them on ebay for around $200 and less. A medium action rod is a great help in shaping my cast and it might help you too.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    3,848
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default Re: Nice Quality Beginner Rod w/ Room to Grow

    Quote Originally Posted by alfordjo View Post
    I just had loads of fun at St Peters Fly Shop in Fort Collins.

    They had me cast 3 rods - Sage VXP, Sage One and Scott A4.

    I bet every one can tell me which one I liked the best (and seemed to throw the best) - the Sage One.


    I also signed up for a 2 day clinic in a few weeks.

    The journey continues.


    Jonathan
    Have fun with it!

    Dennis

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Adirondacks & Great Lakes Tribs
    Posts
    297

    Default Re: Nice Quality Beginner Rod w/ Room to Grow

    I see you test casted the vxp and one rods along with some others. Good for you getting the rods in your hands, a lot of beginners come onto the forum and ask people to essentially make a rod decision for them and then most experienced anglers respond by saying "get some rods in your hands its the only way to know what works for you".

    You mentioned in the beginning that you didn't want to spend over $300. With that said I noticed you casted best with the sage one. One thing you should know is beginners typically find it easier to throw super fast action rods with high line speed, and find it more difficult to cast a slower rod with a more parabolic action to the blank. I believe for beginners the rod that is a bit slower will lead to the new fly angler becoming a more skilled caster given that slower rods tend to be less forgiving than very fast rods such as the sage one. If I were you I would heavily consider that VXP, I chose to purchase a vxp over the ONE rod, I believe its a better rod, one that is better suited for the "all-rounder" catagory. The vxp is certainly less forgiving than the one rod, but ultimately once you get dialed in with the vxp you just might be so amazed. After owning and fishing countless 9' 5 weights over the years, I have found the vxp to be an unparalleled piece of graphite and one of the best sage has ever produced. Just because it wears a pricetag $300 less than the ONE doesn't mean the ONE is a better rod, they are two very different rods. However, if the ONE just "does it" for you, get that rod! At the end of the day the rod needs to have that spark in your hand, thats the most important thing. I just like to remind people that the most expensive is not always the best.

  11. #50

    Default Re: Nice Quality Beginner Rod w/ Room to Grow

    Updated my original post - but it is the result also.

    I ended up buying a Sage VT2 - found a new one on clearance so I have the warranty also - matching it up with a Lamson Velocity I also found on clearance.

    Now I need to hit the water - thanks for all the help!

    Jonathan

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