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  1. #1

    Default Tippet protection? Learn to set the hook.

    Many rods tout themselves as having great tippet protection built into the taper. I never really understood this when catching small brookies in northern Michigan.

    The problem is small quick splashy trout program bad habits into fly anglers.

    When I started looking for bigger fish on light tippet, I'd set the hook like I was setting on those little brookies. Snap. Snap. Snap. Lost alot of good fish.

    This was even more apparent on a few trips to the Missouri with a couple great guides (Ben Hardy & Ryan Mcourtney). Those were big fish, and we were fishing 6x most of the days.

    Got the stink eye and enough coaching from those guides that I stopped snapping off, even with fast/stiff rods.

    I say tippet protection is marketing hype. Set the hook quickly, but take the power out of the set. Gently and quickly lift the rod tip, dont swing for the fences.



    Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
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    Lake Stevens, WA
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    Default Re: Tippet protection? Learn to set the hook.

    "Set the hook quickly, but take the power out of the set. Gently and quickly lift the rod tip, dont swing for the fences."


    This

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  5. #3
    Join Date
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    quiet corner, ct
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    8,605

    Default Re: Tippet protection? Learn to set the hook.

    The "slip strike" (as opposed to the "strip strike")

    It's a technique that I learned on my own, but I've recently seen it written about.

    When you raise your rod tip to strike, you take your rod hand forefinger off of the line that you have clamped to the rod.
    The line slips, but as the fish turns, the minimal force of raising the rod tip is enough to set the hook.
    It's just enough to set the hook, but you don't have the tight line that causes break-offs
    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements.” --- Horace Kephart

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  7. Default Re: Tippet protection? Learn to set the hook.

    Not so sure I agree completely with the lead post. I think you are correct that a powerful hook set (especially with light tippets) can and will lead to break-offs. But I have seen a bunch of big fish lost with a gentle hook set but the rod tip was too stiff to fight the fish with light tippets and the fly popped out or the tippet broke. I know in my experience that I land more fish, especially big fish, with a rod that has tippet protecting tip.

  8. #5
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Tippet protection? Learn to set the hook.

    I seem to be having the problem of not setting the hook hard enough. I have been using barbless hooks and seem to loose more fish than I feel I should. I have at times made sure to get a little more oomph into my hook set. Mostly wrist action and on those days I lose less fish. On the days I use the quick lift they seem to come unbuttoned more often. The problem may be rod related. What do you think?

    Bill

  9. Default Re: Tippet protection? Learn to set the hook.

    Tippet protection is useful for more of the battle than just setting the hook.

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  11. #7

    Default Re: Tippet protection? Learn to set the hook.

    I can get away with much lighter tippets with my fiberglass rod than I can with my stiffer carbon one. Both on the set and while playing the fish.

    The fiberglass rod rarely needs the drag of the reel to play a fish the tip absorbs runs and jumps. I need to pay more attention with my carbon rod. A smallie jumping or suddenly turning into the currrent can snap a heavier tippet on a "less forgiving" rod.

    I also need to strip and set with the fiberglass rod, especially when fishing for bass. The lifting action alone is not enough to get a good hookset. Pike fishing usually takes 2-3 good strips to set the hook. Trout? that's just a gentle lift against the direction of the take (sometimes that "lift" is parallel to the water, especially when nymphing up or downstream)
    Q: How many turns on a whip finish? A: "Enough to cover your mistakes" - AK Best

  12. #8

    Default Re: Tippet protection? Learn to set the hook.

    This is in regards to trout. I don't fight bigger fish with the tip, little guys yes just skip them across the water with the tip or whatever. My drag is usually set pretty loose, loose drag plus any fly rod soft or stiff, will protect the tippet (my opinion), then I adjust the drag according to the fish, I know the drag on my Abel is a few lbs, so I take into account my tippet when I start setting the drag. I think tippet protection is mentioned alot by rod manufacturers, but I think that's more of a crutch, the true tippet protection is the angler

    Sent from my XT1650 using Tapatalk

  13. #9

    Default Re: Tippet protection? Learn to set the hook.

    For the composite of an accurate high-line speed cast and precise compound presentation I find softer flexing, slower recovering tips to be detrimental. Protecting tippets and knots during the strike and subsequent fight to bring a good trout to net I regard as a function of angling technique not rod taper design.

    You have located a fine, sipping trout you hope to catch. You've stealthfully situated yourself and false cast away from the fish* to preclude an errant flash of reflected light or spray of water from your line/leader from alerting him to potential danger. Now you've released your cast and as it unfurls in air you perpendicularly sweep your rod's tip and add slack to the live line forming a reach cast. As the line-leader-fly assembly alights upon the currents you generate an additional upstream slack line mend and perform, any current corrective line manipulations you deem optimal. Your flush floating dun approaches the rising trout, a natural mayfly before and just to the side of it but, so cool, the fish chooses your imitation and as his mouth closes a substantial bulge is formed, he is bigger than you suspected.*

    I may strike upward as he goes down or sideways if he turns. In either situation my fly line is grasped between my thumb and forefinger as my smaller fingers encircle the cork. The line is permitted to slip between these finger's grasp at a rate relative to the amount of line out, the amount of slack between me and the fish, the strength of the current in harmony with my instinctual reaction to what is required to simultaneously drive the hook home and not rip his mandible off. Even as he charges for mid stream deeper water I maintain variable finger tension acting as a clutch to smoothly transfer drag to my reel as the line comes tight. Once the trout is on the reel your judgment about rod height and angle in conjunction with your reels drag setting perhaps with added palming of its rim ultimately and hopefully quickly brings the trout to net.

    Over the past month I fished a couple of G.Loomis NRX's, a Sage ONE and X from #4 to 6-weight, all faster tapered rods with precision, quick recover tips. No flies where popped off in trout's maws and the only tippet that parted proved to be abraded.

    The articulately controlled slip-strike, refined by thoughtfulness and experience, is a vital component in harmony with current defying compound presentation are the prerequisites for engaging large, wild surface feeding trout in battle.

  14. #10
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    Default Re: Tippet protection? Learn to set the hook.

    Quote Originally Posted by brownbass View Post
    I seem to be having the problem of not setting the hook hard enough. I have been using barbless hooks and seem to loose more fish than I feel I should. I have at times made sure to get a little more oomph into my hook set. Mostly wrist action and on those days I lose less fish. On the days I use the quick lift they seem to come unbuttoned more often. The problem may be rod related. What do you think?

    Bill
    Just an update. I took a Sage Accel fishing today and fished a beetle dry and only had two or three come unbuttoned. I missed, more strikes than that. I believe the problem is fisherman related.

    Bill

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