Thanks Thanks:  3
Likes Likes:  28
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 40
  1. Default Re: does the 7 wt get overlooked a bit much?

    I'm a big fan of 7 weights myself. They are certainly overlooked by most anglers who fish for trout and saltwater and therefore usually have a 5 and an 8. But warmwater guys love them, as do folks fishing for large trout with streamers. I fish 5, 6, 7, and 8 weights and the 7 gets a multiple times more use than the 8. The 8 mostly wastes away in it's tube. While the 5 and 6 are much better all around rods for most of us, the 7 is incredibly versatile for a multi-species rod.

    They are without question the most versatile rod for black bass species. I often say the 9' 7 weight is the 9' 5 weight of the bass world. They also are perfect for big river trout streamers with sinking lines and single hand steelhead fishing. I would argue that they are the best for carp as well, having muscle but still having the capability to be delicate in the hands of a good caster. I agree that it can be tricky to find the right 7 weight because we demand a lot from a 7 weight. Streamers, bass, carp, and salt all from one rod is a tall order. But it definitely works! Mine right now is a TFO Mangrove. Excellent general purpose 7 weight. I have my eye on the Scott Tidal though...

  2. Likes rsagebrush liked this post
  3. #12

    Default Re: does the 7 wt get overlooked a bit much?

    My trout quiver is all Scott as I live in Colorado and like to support local brands. I have a 7ft 3wt F series, an 8'8" G2 4wt for dry fly fishing, a 9ft S4 6wt for nymphing and hoppers and a 9ft 7wt X2S for throwing meat from my boat.

    The F series fiberglass rod is just flat out fun on a small mountain stream and the G2 as a dry fly rod lives up to its reputation and there is no need to say more on it.

    I would love to have a Radian, but bought all my rods before I got married and had two kids. The S4 doesn't have the reputation that the Radian does, but it easily throws big hoppers into the wind and three fly nymph rigs. The soft tip protects 6x and 7x tippet on the South Platte amazingly, but still has the backbone to stop those hot bucks in Cheeseman or control big fish from the boat.

    With that said, the 6wt S4 just doesn't have what I need to throw a full sinking line with big double cone head streamers. Especially when from a boat where I need quick accurate shots without hitting anyone in the back of the head. Plus, on the boat, you really need a dedicated streamer rod that you can grab quickly and don't have to pull off a nymph rig and change reels, etc.

    The Scott X2S I got for a song and it was known as a pretty soft/more medium action saltwater rod. I think it is the perfect streamer rod (and carp rod). I do think the Meridian in a 7wt would be a little much for this purpose, but a 7wt Radian would be tits.

    My concluding thoughts....the newest generation of 7wt saltwater rods are probably a bit light for most saltwater applications and a bit heavy for trout. The 7wt freshwater rods are the perfect streamer rods for sinking lines as an 8wt would be a bit much and while maybe easier to cast long distance, not as much fun in the fight. It is a specialty rod, but I absolutely love chucking meat from the boat with that X2S and a full sink line...perfect balance of strong butt, soft tip and mid flex.

    All that said, I am not a fan of throwing streamers on a floating line and don't think the rod would excel under that circumstance.

  4. Likes clouserguyky liked this post
  5. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    1,739

    Default Re: does the 7 wt get overlooked a bit much?

    Quote Originally Posted by joe_strummer View Post
    I was unaware that the 7wt was unloved, although it is a transition point -- heavy for trout, light for salt, situational rather than general purpose when looked at through those lenses. I use 7s quite a bit, a B3x for carpin and general purpose light warmwater, and an Xi3 and a 9'6" One when a bit of muscle is needed. The One doesn't get used much -- I don't know why I ever bought a 9'6" rod -- but the Xi3 is a very useful warmwater rod that I like for throwing bass bugs and for fishing deep in open water for wipers if the wind's not blowing (wind's usually blowing). My next rod is going to be a #7 Meridian, which seems to me to sit between the B3x and the Xi3 on the spectrum of finesse to power.
    What is your projected use for the Meridian? Just curious, as my itchy trigger finger has been on the Checkout Now button at TA's website for a while, but then I wonder if a 7-weight Radian is a better tool for my intended uses (lake fishing for all kinds of species, from the deck of a bass boat, with maybe some river streamer fishing, but not with the huge meat).

  6. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Re: does the 7 wt get overlooked a bit much?

    I am not sure how the newer 7 wt rods in today's market are as i have never had a chance to fish with any of them but i have an old Garcia Conolon 7wt rod that gets a lot of love.It is one of my favorite rods for largemouth bass and has no problem casting small clousers or large streamers.It has plenty of backbone for landing larger fish but also will do well if i were fishing for panfish.I have a 5,6,and 8 wt rod but the 7 wt gets more use than any of them.
    -Steve


    "There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm."-Patrick f. McManus

  7. #15

    Default Re: does the 7 wt get overlooked a bit much?

    Quote Originally Posted by el jefe View Post
    What is your projected use for the Meridian? Just curious, as my itchy trigger finger has been on the Checkout Now button at TA's website for a while, but then I wonder if a 7-weight Radian is a better tool for my intended uses (lake fishing for all kinds of species, from the deck of a bass boat, with maybe some river streamer fishing, but not with the huge meat).
    I would definitely try and cast both. I think you might find the 7wt Radian to be a better freshwater tool then the 7wt Meridian. Especially if you are not going to be throwing a full sink line with big coneheaded streamers

  8. Thanks el jefe thanked for this post
  9. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Riverside, CA
    Posts
    223

    Default Re: does the 7 wt get overlooked a bit much?

    I am looking at adding a 7wt rod. I am looking a a stickman or a sage. It is a hard decision I have 6wt method and a 8wt salt. I think it will fit as a light salt rod to a a heavy freshwater trout and bass. But it is hard as then I have to pick out a new reel, probably a hatch 5 plus in cyan, shh don’t let my wife know.

  10. Likes tex68w liked this post
  11. #17

    Default Re: does the 7 wt get overlooked a bit much?

    Quote Originally Posted by el jefe View Post
    What is your projected use for the Meridian? Just curious, as my itchy trigger finger has been on the Checkout Now button at TA's website for a while, but then I wonder if a 7-weight Radian is a better tool for my intended uses (lake fishing for all kinds of species, from the deck of a bass boat, with maybe some river streamer fishing, but not with the huge meat).
    I'll use it pretty much that way, from a boat, black bass, true bass, carp, minus trout rivers, and as a legit option for Maine schoolies, FLA shark and turtle watching, other light s/w. I cast it alongside a Salt HD and decided the Meridian fit my needs best, a 7 with good power but also with enough touch to be fun to use carpin -- carpin is not the forte of my Xi3 or One, imo. I have the 6 Meridian and use it a lot.

  12. Thanks el jefe thanked for this post
  13. #18

    Default Re: does the 7 wt get overlooked a bit much?

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbright View Post
    I am looking at adding a 7wt rod. I am looking a a stickman or a sage. It is a hard decision I have 6wt method and a 8wt salt. I think it will fit as a light salt rod to a a heavy freshwater trout and bass. But it is hard as then I have to pick out a new reel, probably a hatch 5 plus in cyan, shh don’t let my wife know.
    Obviously, the Hatch reels are amazing, but since you do have the 8wt, the Allen Kraken has treated me really well for the price.

  14. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Brazoria County, SE Texas
    Posts
    1,660
    Blog Entries
    12

    Default Re: does the 7 wt get overlooked a bit much?

    My first fly rod was a 7wt, A Gary Borger Pro by Targus. It's actually a very nice rod that I seldom use, but it is an excellent Texas Redfish rod only at 9' it's just a little longer than I like to carry in the kayak. I've used it on cold water trout in a stream. It can certainly cast a tungsten weighted streamer a long way and pull stubborn fish from out of the current.

    If I had to only take one rod when I went after redfish, except where really big fish are the norm, it would be a 7 weight. I'd pick a 7 weight for Largemouth bass if I could only have one rod to choose from.
    Wherever you go, there you are.

  15. Likes tex68w liked this post
  16. #20

    Default Re: does the 7 wt get overlooked a bit much?

    Another thing I think is going to make a 7 weight even less useful is the new short single hand skagit heads. Now it's easier to cast heavy streamers and tips on a 5 weight than casting the same stuff on a 7 or 8 with standard lines.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-06-2018, 06:20 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-05-2018, 10:30 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-22-2018, 10:20 PM
  4. Overlooked Lakes, Overcrowded Rivers
    By jdarkfox in forum Fly Fishing How To's
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 09-29-2014, 11:29 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-17-2008, 04:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •