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  1. #21

    Default Re: Slow, moderate or fast action rods.

    I own rods ranging from slow to fast, but if given a choice I prefer a rod with a moderate action. This isn't always the best choice every situation, but from a pure enjoyment standpoint it's what I like best. I do a lot of roll and single hand spey casting, and a rod that flexes well into the blank is definitely the way to go. I also feel how a rod flexes when I'm fighting a fish is important, and I want to feel even an average sized fish put a nice bend in my rod, but still have enough power in the butt to put the wood to a more powerful fish.

  2. Default Re: Slow, moderate or fast action rods.

    Probably moderate fast action. But I have always liked to try new (to me) things and have managed to fish quite a few rods. The result so far is that I have favourites that span the board. Rods I really like include Orvis Recon, H2, Sage One, Sage LL, ZXL, TXL but also bass action old bamboo Heddons and more delicate Payne and Leonards.

    I have disliked a few rods I have tried but mostly they just were not what I hoped for and did not resonate with me.
    Rods I have instantly disliked range from noodly bamboo to unresponsive graphite.

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  4. #23

    Default Re: Slow, moderate or fast action rods.

    Quote Originally Posted by jds108 View Post
    I guess I'm the outlier. I like very fast action rods and always have, going on about 35 years now. Orvis made a boron rod in the '80s that was the first rod I cast and thought, wow, that's stiff! Those turned out to be too brittle as I understand it and Orvis discontinued them. When Sage brought out the TCR, that was the first rod where I ever thought "hey, this is too stiff/fast". In retrospect, the issue was that my casting stroke still had room for improvement.
    I don't know about the Orvis Boron-Graphite being brittle, I regarded them as tough as nails. The only one of mine that failed was the 9-weight I lent to a friend venturing to Venezuela. Poor craftsmanship led to the reel seat coming loose, unglued. He poured a tube of Super Glue into it on the boat and set it aside to cure. A small oversight...he neglected to realign the seat with the guides and it was like 90 degrees off and unfishable. He apologized and I sent it into Orvis who could not get the seat off to repair. These rods had more lifting power than any previous fly rod and the 12-weight is major beast. The problem leading to their discontinuation is folks couldn't cast them. They were so stiff and demanding of perfect timing that they frustrated many. They were like 60% Boron filament and 40% graphite. But you have inspired me. I just pulled out the baby B/G, an 8 1/2'/#6 2 pc. and though a tad heavy it has a nice fast taper and feel's good giving it a shake. I'm leaving it out and will take it out to cast as soon as warmer weather returns.

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  6. #24

    Default Re: Slow, moderate or fast action rods.

    Quote Originally Posted by troutman75 View Post
    I have always liked to try new (to me) things and have managed to fish quite a few rods. I have disliked a few rods I have tried but mostly they just were not what I hoped for and did not resonate with me.
    Rods I have instantly disliked range from noodly bamboo to unresponsive graphite.
    A fly rod's number one job is to be responsive, regardless of material or taper action.
    Whether a steep tapered ONE with its lively, scalpel-like tip or a deep flexing, slow and smooth TMF or Circa the rod must enable the angler to direct his line and ultimately fly just where and how he ants it while simultaneously performing any request line manipulation with ample feed back and control. A rod which wobbles about, looses tracking, suffers lower taper power outages or tip collapse is a rod that won't fish.

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  8. #25

    Default Re: Slow, moderate or fast action rods.

    Quote Originally Posted by sweetandsalt View Post
    I don't know about the Orvis Boron-Graphite being brittle, I regarded them as tough as nails. The only one of mine that failed was the 9-weight I lent to a friend venturing to Venezuela. Poor craftsmanship led to the reel seat coming loose, unglued. He poured a tube of Super Glue into it on the boat and set it aside to cure. A small oversight...he neglected to realign the seat with the guides and it was like 90 degrees off and unfishable. He apologized and I sent it into Orvis who could not get the seat off to repair. These rods had more lifting power than any previous fly rod and the 12-weight is major beast. The problem leading to their discontinuation is folks couldn't cast them. They were so stiff and demanding of perfect timing that they frustrated many. They were like 60% Boron filament and 40% graphite. But you have inspired me. I just pulled out the baby B/G, an 8 1/2'/#6 2 pc. and though a tad heavy it has a nice fast taper and feel's good giving it a shake. I'm leaving it out and will take it out to cast as soon as warmer weather returns.
    That's interesting! I was in high school when those came out and had only been fishing a few years, and not surprisingly didn't cast well at the time. I was using either an original first run Sage graphite or a Lamiglass that was so slow it was like bamboo, so that B/G rod was so radically different to what I'd been using it really stood out. The fragility comment was probably at least third-hand info by the time it made it to me, so I'd certainly default to your knowledge there. Looking forward to hearing how it casts today.

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  10. #26
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Slow, moderate or fast action rods.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ard View Post
    It's difficult to answer in a self effacing way, truth is that I have no real preference at all. I've owned some of the least advanced fly rods you could imagine, that was when I was young. Now I'm growing old I guess and still have the same hobby, fly fishing / casting. My fly rod selection is way larger than I can use in any regular rotation and they range from fiberglass & bamboo to rods like Sage One & X rods. At this point of experience it really doesn't matter what I use, I can make it work in a comfortable manner.

    I'm not as fine tuned when it comes to rods as many of you folks are but I can recognize the differences say between my 15 foot Winston 7 weight and the Sage One 13'6" 8 weight when it comes to feel. Same goes with the one hand rods like the difference between my old Far & Fine and the new Sage Foundation #5 I have. In fact I like them all equally I guess.
    Ard: Well said! I'm pretty much in the same camp. On small streams I prefer a slow or moderate action rod, but when I'm on stillwater's or fishing streamers I prefer a fast action rod. In between I can handle pretty much anything that I have in my hands.
    Larry


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  12. #27
    Join Date
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    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
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    Default Re: Slow, moderate or fast action rods.

    It's been years Larry and I know I need video proof (maybe this year) but I tied about 40 foot of DT 11 line around a piece of base board I had made. 8 foot X 4 inches, cedar with what I'd call a very stiff action and then proceeded to lay out some decent casts. Think of it as a Tenkara rod with a lot of backbone but you can do it.

    I'm very much lost on threads where the intricacies' of tapers and actions gets dissected and seldom comment. This business of casting has been pretty much like swimming and riding my bike in that I can swim even in current and ride anything from a BMX to a touring bicycle. It's that way with rods, some work better than others but you can make them all work.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

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  14. #28
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    Default Re: Slow, moderate or fast action rods.

    I would agree with many in this post....I think most competent casters can make any rod function satisfactorily for use. Most of us with more "vintage" time spent in this endeavor likely began with rods that certainly required, at the very least, becoming accustomed to them to be serviceable. To this point, I agree, a decent caster can make any rod "function" for the purpose.

    Now conversely, I also believe, that most seeking feedback in these types of post are referring to "personal preference" rather than what we can simply make work. I also understand this, I'm a fairly experienced wood worker and raised a builders son, I worked professionally as a custom interior trim carpenter and cabinet/furniture maker and it's still a hobby, and, I was also a master automotive technician and worked professionally as one prior to transitioning into shop ownership and then further into corporate executive capacities....by this, I am quite confident that I can accomplish more with a circular saw and pair of pliers than the average Joe, I can make those two specific tools work for a job in a pinch, but they are certainly NOT my "preference" for my preferred tools for all tasks, I'm no more interested in changing spark plugs with pliers, or hand cutting and sanding built -in's with a circular saw, than I am in casting a fly rod I don't enjoy for trout. Both will work in a pinch, but, again, not my "preference". In all cases "less suited" anything, at a minimum, diminishes the experience.

    I guess I've reached a point where I've found life is simply far too precious and short for frustration to interrupt living, I've gotten "mature" enough that I would rather skip the experience altogether than try and tackle anything in a half-butted manor. I've similarly reached a point where sub-standard anything has lost it's appeal. It's just not worth it to me any longer, every moment needs to be considered a gift and not wasted on less than it could be, I don't fish out of leaking boats because they may dampen my enjoyment of that time spent, and I will not try to make chicken salad out of chicken poop or improvise as I did in my younger years just to engage in something. I will not fish fly rods I do not fully enjoy, I won't drink cheap whiskey I do not enjoy, I will not hunt behind poor quality, ill-trained, bird dogs, I will not accept a sub standard IPA in my craft beer enjoyment. I would far rather have "fewer" fully enjoyed memories, than "many" unmemorable and sub-par experiences. I am a "quality" over "quantity" guy....in experiences, in relationships, in material goods, and in life in general. My dad always said, it's about the quality of life not the quantity, now I know what he meant.

    All this said, I am confident that I could make any fly rod ever produced "function"......but the question in my mind would be: "WHY would I want to?". IMO. YMMV. Just my 2 cents and likely worth about half that.
    Last edited by cooutlaw; 01-01-2019 at 06:34 PM.

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  16. #29
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    Default Re: Slow, moderate or fast action rods.

    When sight fishing I prefer fast rods like a Sage TCX, but I like a more moderate taper for extended blind casting.

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  18. #30

    Default Re: Slow, moderate or fast action rods.

    "I will not fish fly rods I do not fully enjoy, I won't drink cheap whiskey I do not enjoy..." cooutlaw

    Well, there you have it. I too can make any rod/line match-up, regardless of how crumby, work. I can cast a line with my hand, no rod (not as far as Lefty though). I've long appreciated good and appropriate equipment. Not necessarily expensive; I wear a solar rechargeable/satellite time setting Casio in preference over my "dress-up" manual wind, Swiss movement Tissot.

    From a long time ago, there are photographs of my brother and me holding stingers of dead trout between us. No, I'm not embarrassed by that, it is what helped teach me that fishing was not entirely about catching and more about the quality of the adventure. For a long time now I've walked past rising fish I chose not to disturb while hunting for the one I want to challenge myself with. I eschew blind casting with a nymph which was so effective in my youth.

    I continue to poses great rods from the past that were tops in their day, some built by me from blanks as I could not afford the finished rods. Every two or three years though I learned that rod makers improved the performance and character of their rods further enhancing the quality of my experience if not the number of fish I caught. A year has not gone by in the century in which I have not upgraded my kit with new-and-improved tackle. I have a rich foundational basis for comparison and when on occasion I fish one of my old favorites, while appreciating it nostalgically, it reinforces how far new material and design values have evolved.

    A couple of days ago, at the end of last year, we went to a friend's party. I know he likes fine Bourbon but it was my new years too so I brought him a good bottle of Highland Single Malt... With the holiday season stretching from Thanksgiving to New Years Eve now behind us, my next big event is three days in Edison, NJ for the big Fly Fishing Show. I am certain some new rod I've never cast before is going to excite me and impact my kit come Spring.

    A Far&Fine and original Scott Graphite built by me back when they were the Best-in-Class.
    E07 146 RF1980Rods s.jpg

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