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  1. #31

    Default Re: Nymphing with the Scott G Series

    For those who know both, how would you describe the difference between the 884 and the 885?

    Said differently, when would you choose to fish one over the other?

    I am looking forward to casting both side by side but there is still snow around these parts that means I have to wait to do a casting comparison.


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  2. #32

    Default Re: Nymphing with the Scott G Series

    Quote Originally Posted by edreilly View Post
    For those who know both, how would you describe the difference between the 884 and the 885?

    Said differently, when would you choose to fish one over the other?

    I am looking forward to casting both side by side but there is still snow around these parts that means I have to wait to do a casting comparison.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

    I own both GS884 & GS885, and the GS844.....all fill different specialty roles for me. The 844 is smaller-Med water, dries, small terrestrials, and light nymphing if needed - pin point trico/dun type rod. The 884 steps into play on med size + tail waters for similar duty, but potentially also throwing slightly larger stuff....although the two are very similar, the 884 is slightly slower but offers a slight advantage on longer leaders, playing larger fish and mending...it's a go to tail water dry/nymph combo. The GS885 fills a role as an all around walk and wade trout 5wt. It's med fast, and has more backbone than the 884, not as delicate or specialized, I'd put it in a class with a Winston BIIIX/LS, but with an even smoother profile and quicker recovery, and IMO, more versatile. The GS885 is, again IMO, night and day from the G2 885...which I liked, but never loved, as it had a bounciness to it in it's casting profile that kept it in it's tube, where I favored the BIIIX/LS for similar duty. After spending time with the GS 885, I sold the BIIIX, as they were very similar, but the accuracy and recovery and sweetness of the GS, just fit my needs and preferences better. I think there is less change between the G2 884 and GS 884 (I own both), the GS does recover quicker and is more stable and slightly more accurate, but I think they didn't want to change too dramatically as the 884 was already a highly regarded specialty piece. The 844, as some have seen me post previously, is an anomaly and perhaps the most improved in the entire series, it has created a slight shift from some experienced Scott owners to choose it over the 884, it's nearly as versatile and the recovery allows for some serious casting control, in smaller water closer situations if you like the 884, the 844 will give you another gear for line speed that the 884 doesn't have closer in, it's a special rod for sure. That said, almost the entire new GS series is excellent, these are not powerhouse long ball rods, but they are, in every way, dedicated fishing tools in the typical Scott fashion. I've spent the last three years thinning down my collection, updating a few areas,and working toward downsizing and retirement, I have a long way to go, but none of the GS rods I own will be leaving. They fish well, bottom line. As to all the previous discussion, there are other rods that one would want to accompany these in your quiver, particularly for heavier nymphing and streamer duties, as has been said, BUT particularly to fill a role of versatile rods within their given parameters of limitations, they are a pretty competitive and compelling option. If a guy wanted only Scott gear and fished 3wt-6wt configurations, a FS663, GS773, GS883, GS844, GS884, GS885, GS906, Radian 905, Radian 906, Radian 1004, these 10 rods would potentially fill every scenario one would ever encounter for trout fishing anywhere, ever. As most know, I like rods from many makers, all have some great sweet spots, but I'm not sure there is actually any other single maker that could fill every one of these roles with their offerings, and at least provide, good to great rods in each category doing so. Are there better rods to be hand picked from all makers sweet spots more use specific and specialized? Sure. But I know of no other maker that can offer from tiniest of creek to big water streamer and not fall off with a marginal offering somewhere in the mix. Arguably, there are better rods for every one of the above categories, let alone if one wants to mix in additional particular specialized usages too, but you'd have to hand pick offerings from 6-10 various makers to compile superior offerings across the board, and, there wouldn't be much of a spread even then. Realistically, good can only get so good.
    Last edited by cooutlaw; 03-12-2019 at 01:14 PM.

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  4. #33

    Default Re: Nymphing with the Scott G Series

    cooutlaw, How would you characterize the taper design and casting/fishing traits of related size GS and Radian rods?

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  6. #34

    Default Re: Nymphing with the Scott G Series

    Quote Originally Posted by sweetandsalt View Post
    cooutlaw, How would you characterize the taper design and casting/fishing traits of related size GS and Radian rods?
    S&S, I actually used Radian just as a popular faster rod that fulfills the spots of a couple suggested scenarios above post. I believe the forum has discussed Radian at length, and we have met a consensus that although not to every anglers personal preference, it could/would be considered to reside as one of the many top fast rods in production, though different than NRX, X, ONE, Method, Igniter, Asquith, and a host of others.

    That said, for comparison I will use a rod of alternative brand that many know...the X, The X differs from the Radian, IMO, in that Radian is a faster, tip flex, rod morphing into a stronger mid and butt section but arguably contains a hinged transition top mid section more similar to Z -axis than X to me. The X is a more fluid flexing, quick recovering rod, but, as you have often said, differing by each configuration, the 9' 5wt being a different flex profile than the 8'6" 5wt for instance. For comparison, the best I can use would be between say the 884 GS and 844 GS, both being a slightly slower, more full flex profile but with similar X like recovery, the 884 being like a 9' 5wt X, a bit fuller flexing, and the 844 being like a 8'6" 5wt X...a bit faster, and swift tip recovery. The Radian in comparison to GS is more like comparing X to Radian....the GS in my mind is a toned down, slightly softer, X - similar stability and recovery. Radian and GS are very different rods with very different feel and different designs of recovery, for difference of purpose no doubt, I feel similar distictions comparing X vs Radian.

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  8. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Default Re: Nymphing with the Scott G Series

    Quote Originally Posted by cooutlaw View Post
    If a guy wanted only Scott gear and fished 3wt-6wt configurations, a FS663, GS773, GS883, GS844, GS884, GS885, GS906, Radian 905, Radian 906, Radian 1004, these 10 rods would potentially fill every scenario one would ever encounter for trout fishing anywhere, ever. As most know, I like rods from many makers, all have some great sweet spots, but I'm not sure there is actually any other single maker that could fill every one of these roles with their offerings, and at least provide, good to great rods in each category doing so. Are there better rods to be hand picked from all makers sweet spots more use specific and specialized? Sure. But I know of no other maker that can offer from tiniest of creek to big water streamer and not fall off with a marginal offering somewhere in the mix. Arguably, there are better rods for every one of the above categories, let alone if one wants to mix in additional particular specialized usages too, but you'd have to hand pick offerings from 6-10 various makers to compile superior offerings across the board, and, there wouldn't be much of a spread even then. Realistically, good can only get so good.
    You, sir, have nailed it. This is really close to my ideal quiver, one which I am heading toward.

    Your overall point about the Scott lineup is very solid; the bolded part is especially so. I disagree slightly with your next sentence, for many of the rods you listed are best-in-class. There are other specialty rods that might come close, but there are clearly some class winners from Scott in there. While I have not tried Winston and their new line, if you fish for trout and only purchase Scott rods, you would have the best there is. Jim Bartschi is just flat out killing it these days.

    Oh, and did we mention how exemplary Scott's customer service is? And how well they are supported by their largest world-wide dealer in Telluride?

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  10. #36

    Default Re: Nymphing with the Scott G Series

    Quote Originally Posted by el jefe View Post
    You, sir, have nailed it. This is really close to my ideal quiver, one which I am heading toward.

    Your overall point about the Scott lineup is very solid; the bolded part is especially so. I disagree slightly with your next sentence, for many of the rods you listed are best-in-class. There are other specialty rods that might come close, but there are clearly some class winners from Scott in there. While I have not tried Winston and their new line, if you fish for trout and only purchase Scott rods, you would have the best there is. Jim Bartschi is just flat out killing it these days.

    Oh, and did we mention how exemplary Scott's customer service is? And how well they are supported by their largest world-wide dealer in Telluride?
    Thank you, I try for accuracy in my assessments and to speak to only that which I have first hand experience and not to anything I do not. My 35+ years of trout specific, on water experience, generally has formed my opinions of real world needs and how various tools live up to those demands. If it's not 0wt to 6wt you will never likely see my input or feedback.

    To iterate further in explanation of the previous disclaimers around the listed Scott offerings to bridge various categories across this specific spectrum, there are some excellent rods, by numerous makers, falling into specialty pocket areas that the 10 rods listed would handle fishing for, but not to specialist standards.

    For instance, S&S fishes with a very specialized skill set for dries on larger water, and his preferences for that window of presentation yields a need/desire for an optimum tool for specifically that task...for him, the Radian 905 lacks the tip stability and recovery timing preference required, although it would perform 75% of what he needs, there are better rods for this particular pocket of specialized presentation. As it would be for a dedicated Streamer junkie only, say in MT, there would also be an above listed Scott that would handle the fishing scenario, but a more specialized rod focused specifically at slinging 8" Streamer monstrosities, Maybe a 9'6" 7wt big open loop performer would be superior. For a small creek guy, which consumes a good portion of my interest, The 773 GS and the FS 663 are solid top rods in the category, but....there is a very small specialized window in between the two...where the 663 is just a bit light and the 773 GS is just a touch too much rod....this might be filled with a competitors offering...like 7'6" 3 wt Pure or BIII LS, or a 6'10" 3wt Murray Mountain Trout, or a 6'6" or 8' 3wt Winston IM6/WT....then we have windy day or faster presentation small water where the 773GS is not quite enough and the 844GS is too much, where one could add 763 Radian or 376 Dart type rods.

    I also separate a difference in a big water 9' 4wt fast dry rod and med water 884GS/844GS....where the 9' version might be filled by NRX or Asquith for optimum line speed - IMO, the 9' 4wt Radian isnt a top contender here. Where a 9' 4wt Pure would be a top contender as a dry only big water zero wind 4wt (yes really-read reviews and cast one), the 884 GS would be just slightly a notch below, but way more versatile overall and better on med water. The 8' 4wt Pure/Air also falls into a specialty niche...overlapping slightly with a 7'6" 4wt class....the 844GS plays here too, but is actually capable of doubling duty into the 8'6" 4wt class...and fishes just slightly larger than the 8' 4wt Pure/Air. The specialty pocket is tighter in this category. Also there is a very small specialty pocket between an 885GS and 905 Radian, for someone that wants a medium sized water, windy day, high line speed rod, the 855 Radian doesn't fill this as well as say the 8'6" 5wt X.


    The moral of the story is this....somebody could loose their mind filling every specialty pocket in a quiver....I know I'm one of the ones who has tried and the 250+ rods I've been thinning out for three years is proof. The 10 rods I listed will indeed fish every possible instance of trout fishing, and many are indeed top rods in their categories, but there are a dozen other specialty niche's that these rods can certainly capably play in, but won't be the best of the best in that particular specialty. I will however stand upon my comment....I do not know of another maker, right now, that can bridge this full spectrum with good to great rods in all of these categories. There are certainly sweet spots from every maker, and each may make a best or better specialty rod, but they all have turds amongst the roses if you view their full lineups and all series. I will say, I think Scott is doing a great job at making sure every offering they have released as of current is competitive in every way before releasing it. They just aren't making very many rods in any series that aren't solid performers and worthy of being in the conversation of top rods in a spectrum of categories. That again, is not to say other makers are not killing it with various releases, but series to series, across the entire spectrum, I am not seeing another maker that is as complete in offerings 2-6wt, but MANY makers are contributing great offerings to the specialty pockets, which arguably, supports my open ended disclaimer that other makers may offer superior offerings in specific niche's. Again, preferences are what drives us and allows us the freedom to explore individual options for gear that suites each of us best individually. But at some point, good enough is good enough, and enough coverage is enough coverage, fractions of performance become unworthy of lengthy consideration, and it's time to......well.....simply fish......... FWIW, my opinion only....YMMV.

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  12. #37

    Default Re: Nymphing with the Scott G Series

    As usual, well said, cooutlaw. I concur with your Scott premise but apply this awareness differently. I seek the individual "sweet spots" in series from any maker, including off-shore made rods. Oddly, and many will disagree I'm confident, the weak link in Scotts line up is great selling, important core Radian. Yes, it is true what you observed about its conceptual relationship to Sage's older Z-Axis, a fast rod with power featuring a softer tip. The Z-Axis, though a little heavier I recall, was more successful in that its taper transitions where more sophisticated and far smoother. I am eagerly awaiting (though am aware of no time frame) R2. When I cast excellent Winston 8'/#4's Pure and AIR at Edison, I followed up a little latter casting GS 8'8"/#4...a big gap there for sure making me want to try 8'4"/#4 which was unavailable...but I will I hope soon. I do think in the 8 1/2'/#'s 4 & 5 Sage rules but for 9' trout rods, Rajeff's rods are supreme. Now, despite my appreciation for it, NRX#4 I can understand is a bit over the top for most 9'/#4 applications, T&T's Avantt is a serious contender here and Korean built SKY and new Taylor Truth are very fine indeed...better than the Radian in this size. By the time Radian gets to 6-weight, its tip firms up some and is I think its the best in series but NRX and the uber Sage Method and Igniter #6's are in a different class altogether. Douglas SKY is better too.

    I love Scott and have fished their rods since San Francisco made fiberglass Pow-R-Ply in the 70's but eschew brand loyalty in favor of the diversity of excellence obtainable by selecting the best from among all makers. Like you I enjoy experimenting and, assuming it arrives tomorrow (fingers crossed) new Winston 9'/#9 Salt AIR is coming to Florida with me along with Stickman and SKY. The guide has a boat load of NRX's for comparison.

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  14. #38

    Default Re: Nymphing with the Scott G Series

    Cooutlaw, thanks for your thoughts on the differences in the GS models. It sounds like the 884 is probably the right tool for what I am looking to do.

    Canít wait until it warms up enough to spend some time behind the fly shop casting.




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  16. #39

    Default Re: Nymphing with the Scott G Series

    Anyone have any experience with the GS 904? I wonder if the extra 4 inches of length over the 884 would help getting better drag free drifts. I have read the Telluride Angler write up and they indicate the 9 foot is very similar to the 8-8 but that is the only comparison I can find.


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  17. #40
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    Jun 2011
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    311

    Default Re: Nymphing with the Scott G Series

    I have the GS 904 and it is a great tool for fishing dries, dry/droppers, single nymphs and double nymph rigs (nothing too heavy) with an indicator. I would say this rod shines in the 25-50 foot area. I fished mine at least 10 times last season. I can compare it to the G2 884 and will say it recovers with more stability and handles nymphs better. I still love my G2 884 as a go to dry/dropper rod,

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