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  1. Default Re: Tying versus Buying

    Quote Originally Posted by brook rookie View Post
    Like everything, money can be saved. I bought a couple of boxes of materials from a tyer that was giving up. I spent $300, and in return received more material that I can imagine using for the rest of my days. Included were four capes and saddles (Whiting), almost 50 baggies of already sorted feathers (like the 100 packs), a 36" x 48" piece of elk hide, more zonker strips than I can count, enough dubbing and floss that it is easier to describe by weight, and maybe 80 spools of thread and wire, and more than a thousand hooks of various sizes. There was a lot more stuff including a nice vise extension. I don't think I will have to spend more than a few dollars on materials for the rest of my life. I have had to buy a few more hooks, but I think that is a good thing. BTW, I found the ad on a regionally focused fly fishing forum. My only regret is that I didn't buy a lottery ticket on the same day!
    Dang that's some haul!!! Wish I could luck into something similar. Anyone I've run into with a similar lot wanted >$1000

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  3. #22

    Default Re: Tying versus Buying

    Quote Originally Posted by hokiehunter07 View Post

    Anyone I've run into with a similar lot wanted >$1000
    I was thinking the same thing... and probably still a fair price.
    "Joe"

    "We fish for pleasure; I for mine, you for yours." -James Leisenring

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  5. #23

    Default Re: Tying versus Buying

    Great info by the OP

    one comment though, not trying to make this a kit vs by the piece response, but, for the newb out there, if all you can afford (or justify) is a kit, then get one and start tying - nothing like that first fish on a fly you tied yourself.

    I have only been tying for 10 years, so I am by no means an expert, I do tie, a lot, and I actually teach others to tie each month at the local Cabelas, and I started out with a kit.

    You can make do with a kit for the first year or two while you figure out that you want an upgraded, vice, scissors, hackle pliers, ceramic bobbins, etc. over the years I have replaced 95% of what I originally used, some of it twice, but, I tied a lot of flies using that kit and it never hurts to have a spare vice and tools around in case a friend wants to learn or tie with you.

    I did not say that a kit is the "be all end all", and yes, at some point you are going to want to upgrade, but, if that is what you can afford, or if you just want to get in cheap to "try it out" then go for it.

    I do agree with the others to go to a fly tying class, I know the Cabelas here and the Dept of Wildlife here offer free beginner classes in tying and casting. Great way to get your feet wet (no pun intended).

    Oh, Yeah, don't scrimp on the hackle, herl and marabou, get good quality and you will be much happier when you are wrapping it on the hook.

    YMMV,

    Dave
    ex·pe·ri·ence noun \ik-ˈspir-ē-ən(t)s\

    1. the fact or state of having been affected by or gained knowledge through direct observation or participation

    2. that thing you get just moments after you needed it.

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  7. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Atlanta/West Yellowstone
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Tying versus Buying

    I started tying recently after fly fishing for 15+ years. I own many hundreds of flies; I cannot pass a fly shop by without buying a few. (Even though I would guess that there are 20 or fewer different flies I really ever use!) I made a decision early last fall to "fish or cut bait" as it were on the tying stuff I have owned for many years. And just in the last few weeks I have decided to "fish." I have bought a bunch of materials, and tied a few flies, probably now at a price per fly slowly moving under $50!

    I will never save a nickel on tying flies, if I live another 100 years. I don't know when and if I might really develop the skills to design or tie some of the nuisances and subtleties I see in many commercial flies. BUT, nonetheless ... here is the main point: Tying flies is really fun, and it is very quickly getting to be more and more fun as I quickly pick up some basic skills. And, as for designing flies, I asked in another thread for ideas on converting a "mini-chubby" to a black foam mini chubby flying ant, with blk dubbed abdomen, and white chubby type wing. I got a few helpful replies ... and I did it! And it floats (at least in a bowl with no wind and no waves) and it looks damned good!

    As a wild hypothesis, I am guessing that whatever motivates many of us to "collect" rods, reels, lines, boats(?), flies, etc., and use all that stuff to solve the problem of how to catch that fish in that spot right now, might also be responsible for making fly tying and collecting all the necessary stuff interesting as well.

  8. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Eastern Iowa
    Posts
    6,528

    Default Re: Tying versus Buying

    Quote Originally Posted by webrx View Post
    Great info by the OP

    one comment though, not trying to make this a kit vs by the piece response, but, for the newb out there, if all you can afford (or justify) is a kit, then get one and start tying - nothing like that first fish on a fly you tied yourself......
    I agree, but with a caveat. Don't get sucked into a "Deluxe kit" with a lot of materials. Almost all of it will be Halloween costume grade fur and feathers.

    If you buy a kit that actually has decent materials you will pay for it. At that point you might as well drop 50 bucks on the material to tie the exact flies you want. All that said, the Cabela's tool kits are constantly on sale and good enough to figure out if tying is for you or not. You aren't out much if you don't enjoy it. I did buy a Deluxe kit but luckily used on the auction site for cheap. The materials were 90% trash.

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  10. #26

    Default Re: Tying versus Buying

    ia_trouter

    agreed, When I said kit I was talking about a tying "tools" kit, not materials.

    Materials are a whole other discussion.

    Dave
    ex·pe·ri·ence noun \ik-ˈspir-ē-ən(t)s\

    1. the fact or state of having been affected by or gained knowledge through direct observation or participation

    2. that thing you get just moments after you needed it.

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  12. Default Re: Tying versus Buying

    Very good article and replies. I've been tying since the late 50's, Some of my flies are good and some don't look very good. However, my ugly flies catch fish! I love tying flies because it brings out my creative side. I probably have 1,000 flies tied! Need to go fishing.
    There are so many materials you can use from the fly fishing shops and Catalogs.
    Plus, as you are in a Wal-Mart or Hobby Lobby or sewing shops you will find many items that can be used for tying flies. I use rug yarn and many other yarns, eyelash, Lash Lux, pearl and black bead on a string and many others. Often they are cheaper and close to the same thing from the Fly fishing Catalogs and Shops.
    Maybe this will help some.
    In His Love,
    Clydeep

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  14. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    beside the AuSable River in northern Michigan
    Posts
    3,056

    Default Re: Tying versus Buying

    And, don't forget the auto parts store, clydeep. Those hand mitts made for washing the Fish Truck are capable to supplying enough materials for 10 seasons worth of "mop" flies...

    Jerry, aka hairwing530

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  16. #29

    Default Re: Tying versus Buying

    Quote Originally Posted by clydeep View Post
    .
    There are so many materials you can use from the fly fishing shops and Catalogs.
    Plus, as you are in a Wal-Mart or Hobby Lobby or sewing shops you will find many items that can be used for tying flies. I use rug yarn and many other yarns, eyelash, Lash Lux, pearl and black bead on a string and many others. Often they are cheaper and close to the same thing from the Fly fishing Catalogs and Shops.
    Maybe this will help some.
    In His Love,
    Clydeep
    I agree, sometimes with a little bit of creativity we can save a few bucks.
    Here's a nice article about that in Global Flyfisher.
    tie-better-inexpensive-materials


    Jofer

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