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Thread: Pontoon Boats

  1. Default Pontoon Boats

    I am interested in purchasing a pontoon boat for floating rivers like the Big Horn. I was told the Dave Scadden Madison River H2 was a good selection, but at a cost of $1800.00 I'm not sure. Does anyone have any suggestions for me. Thanks Mike

  2. #2

    Default Re: Pontoon Boats

    How bout the Scadden Madison.
    Or the Outlaw X5, or Avenger
    Or the Skykomish Sunrise http://www.store.northforkoutdoors.c...&products_id=1
    The Madison ST is the pretty much the same as the Madison H2 but urethane bladder instead of being bladderless. The skin is probably stitched and not welded. Not a big deal. It's a grand less. Same frame just different bladders. If I were you, I'd check out the Sky ST (above link). X7 frame, heat welded toons and urethane bladders. I have a buddy that weighs in at about 300 lb. He fishes rivers standing on the casting platform. If you want the best bang for your buck, the Sky ST would be a great pick.
    If you want to spend a little more scratch, I'd go with the Outlaw X5's. Joni and I have had a lot of kickboats and I feel this is the best you can get.
    I'm sure you'll have some more answers and comments on Bucks Bags and Outcast. Both great boats. But now built overseas.
    Life is not like a bowl of cherries. It's more like a jar of ghost peppers. What you eat today might burn your ass tomorrow...

  3. Default Re: Pontoon Boats

    I just recieved my Skykomish ST (Dave Scadden,Northfork) yesterday and will set it up today. I did a lot research and before I bought it and feel pretty confident in my choice. It's currently on sale for $999 which seemed a good deal to me. Quick service too. I ordered it on Monday and got it Thursday. Hope to try it out this weekend.

    My $.02
    Inky

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Pontoon Boats

    Hi Mike,

    I have a little different perspective on using a pontoon on a river. If river fishing is your primary way to fish I think you may be wasting your money on a standing platform and bar. It is probably a great way to fish on still waters but with a river it just doesn't work for me.

    Being able to stand with the flippers on doesn't seem like a plus. With currant you need to have your fins in the water so you can control your drift. You may also have to use an oar every once in a while and you can't do that standing. If you hook a fish you need to be able to move to a back water eddy or at least keep you going in the right direction. You might even want to drop your anchor and again that is easier when you are sitting down.

    On a river you might think you could slide the platform in and out as you needed it. That does solve the problem of being able to use the fins. As you progress down the river if you sit down to control the boat and then want to make a cast you still have the bar up and in the way. So we have bar up and then down, platform in then out or using fins and then not using fins. This is just too much going on to enjoy the float. It is versatile in theory but not practical for me.

    If I was fishing a lot of still water than the standing platform and bar would be a great asset. But I would also have a trolling motor and that would control the boat, not my fins. I think you need to rent or borrow a pontoon and give it a try. Your experience may be different than mine.

    Frank

  5. #5

    Default Re: Pontoon Boats

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Whiton View Post
    Hi Mike,

    I have a little different perspective on using a pontoon on a river. If river fishing is your primary way to fish I think you may be wasting your money on a standing platform and bar. It is probably a great way to fish on still waters but with a river it just doesn't work for me.

    Being able to stand with the flippers on doesn't seem like a plus. With currant you need to have your fins in the water so you can control your drift. You may also have to use an oar every once in a while and you can't do that standing. If you hook a fish you need to be able to move to a back water eddy or at least keep you going in the right direction. You might even want to drop your anchor and again that is easier when you are sitting down.

    On a river you might think you could slide the platform in and out as you needed it. That does solve the problem of being able to use the fins. As you progress down the river if you sit down to control the boat and then want to make a cast you still have the bar up and in the way. So we have bar up and then down, platform in then out or using fins and then not using fins. This is just too much going on to enjoy the float. It is versatile in theory but not practical for me.

    If I was fishing a lot of still water than the standing platform and bar would be a great asset. But I would also have a trolling motor and that would control the boat, not my fins. I think you need to rent or borrow a pontoon and give it a try. Your experience may be different than mine.

    Frank
    Like I mentioned before Frank, It's not as hard as you think it is. I'm not talking class III rapids. Getting into the seat and the bar and platform down and tucked away is amazingly fast. But, if you haven't seen it done, I guess you really wouldn't know. Back eddy's, anchor down, sight cast, catch fish. That's one easy way.
    There must be a lot others that think like me, because there's more and more lean bar, platforms out there and people keep buying them.
    Life is not like a bowl of cherries. It's more like a jar of ghost peppers. What you eat today might burn your ass tomorrow...

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