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  1. #21

    Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

    Quote Originally Posted by kglissmeyer1 View Post
    I guess I can count myself in the minority here. I fish a lot and love the opportunity and challenge of presenting a dry fly to actively feeding fish, with a downstream approach my favorite way to do this. Nothing like getting a good drift into a feeding lane and having the fish eat. My preferred method is down and across with a lot of slack in the line. It does take some time to master this method, but to me its my favorite way to fish dry flies and emergers.

    Kelly.

    I'll stand with you Kelly, as I also prefer a "downstream drift" if possible. I'm sure it's because we've both spent countless hours on the banks of The Henry's Fork just learning by watching some of the best fisherman in the world perfect their craft. For those that have not fished these waters, the "upstream approach and downstream drift" is a tried and true method for fooling these tough Rainbows with dry flies, emerger's, or even softhackles.

    This technique allows one to measure their cast almost perfectly by casting above and beyond the target fish and then by raising the rod tip high enough to pull the fly back towards them it's possible to pinpoint exactly where the fly needs to be, and as soon as it's inline simply lower the rod tip and feed slack into the drift. You can literally drop it right in the ol' bucket!

    I think you can apply this tactic to smaller waters, but in order to do so you must wade very carefully, lower your profile and keep your cast low to the water.

    ---------- Post added at 11:47 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:40 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by mcnerney View Post
    Fysh: You should get a copy of Rene' Harrop's book titled "Learning the Water", it is an excellent read, he has a whole chapter devoted to this subject titled "Fishing the Clock".

    Larry
    It is a very good book.[ame="http://www.amazon.com/Learning-Water-Rene-Harrop/dp/081170579X"]Amazon.com: Learning from the Water (9780811705790): Rene Harrop: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51Xw4Vj%2BEaL.@@AMEPARAM@@51Xw4Vj%2BEaL[/ame]


    As is his first book 'Trout Hunter'. [ame="http://www.amazon.com/Trout-Hunter-Angler-Rene-Harrop/dp/087108922X"]Amazon.com: Trout Hunter: The Way of an Angler (9780871089229): Rene Harrop, Andre Puyans, John Randolph: Books@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41TRPZXW6KL.@@AMEPARAM@@41TRPZXW6KL[/ame]


    Rene is an amazing fisherman, he's one of several that I've watched from the bank/tailgate many times. His natural instincts to find big fish, stalk them, and know what to feed them are second to none. I guess this happens when you live only a few hundred yards from your favorite river. He is a true "Trout Hunter"!
    Last edited by fysh; 03-08-2011 at 09:08 PM.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

    I've always found it better to cast directly or quartered upstream if it's faster water, and if it's slower, than I'll cast out and accross.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

    I have almost no real preference up stream or down stream, I do however, usually walk up stream to stay out of their field of vision. The most important factor in determining presentation style is the likelihood of lining the fish or spooking the fish by floating your fly line over the fish instead of the fly. A downstream cast has almost no chance of lining the fish and therefore spooking the fish prior to the presentation of the fly.
    Coy
    "Share your passion with others"

  4. Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

    Casting upstream and drifting down. Not only do you get a better drag free drift, but since fish face upstream, when they take your fly you are setting the hook towards the rear, right into the corner of the trouts mouth. The only downside side is the possibility of lining the fish. Long fine tippets and a well placed cast takes care of that.
    Casting downstream, often times you will pull the hook right out of the fish's mouth when you set the hook.

  5. #25

    Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

    My preference is to stand towards one bank and cast across and upstream a little, and let the fly drift past me and downstream until I can't mend any more. I love the small creeks, where you walk the bank to the next hole that might have a few trout. I like to be perpendicular to the trout, cast in front of them and drift. I'm not sure if that is really downstream fishing???? that works fine when I'm fishing small creeks and not really even using the waders. Now, if I have to wade one direction or the other through a larger river, I wade downstream and fish downstream.

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

    Quote Originally Posted by mcnerney View Post
    Fysh: You should get a copy of Rene' Harrop's book titled "Learning the Water", it is an excellent read, he has a whole chapter devoted to this subject titled "Fishing the Clock".

    Larry
    Good advice Larry...Fysh look at the big one I caught last year

    more seriouly I fish upstream ,three quarters upstream or across in small streams(curve cast) I sometimes fish downstream in larger streams when necessary.I just noticed you miss more fish and break your tippet more often this way.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

    JP, I stopped (mostly) missing fish/breaking tippet, when I started strip-setting when fishing downstream.
    You don't pull the fly away, and you do the size appropriate set.
    I know....I know, ranting again!
    But really, if there is one tip I would give folks to improve there fishing stats (besides get a drift), this is it.

    Jim

  8. #28

    Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

    Quote Originally Posted by yatahey View Post
    Casting upstream and drifting down. Not only do you get a better drag free drift, Yat, how does that give you a "better drag free drift"? I think a good drift whether from upstream or below, is still a drag free drift. but since fish face upstream, when they take your fly you are setting the hook towards the rear, right into the corner of the trouts mouth. Agreed.The only downside side is the possibility of lining the fish. Long fine tippets and a well placed cast takes care of that.
    Casting downstream, often times you will pull the hook right out of the fish's mouth when you set the hook. Personally I haven't noticed fewer hookups fishing this way. You still have to be patient and wait until the fish closes it's mouth and turns downward back into the water before setting the hook.
    IMHO the biggest advantage to fishing downstream is the ability to pinpoint your presentation, thus, making one perfect offering versus 20 cast that look relatively good, but may be mere inches out of the trouts feeding window, sometimes being an inch or two one way or the other makes all the difference.

    Please don't take me wrong here, a well cast quartered upstream presentation is a great tactic, but the downstream technique is my preferred approach, but certainly not the only one a fisherman should have in the arsenal.
    Last edited by fysh; 03-09-2011 at 11:55 AM.

  9. #29
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    Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

    Quote Originally Posted by fyshstykr View Post
    IMHO the biggest advantage to fishing downstream is the ability to pinpoint your presentation, thus, making one perfect offering versus 20 cast that look relatively good, but may be mere inches out of the trouts feeding window.
    Bingo! That probably says it all. The other stuff concerning hook set, etc. is all learned.

    Kelly.
    I fish, therefore I am - but I gotta go to work first..."piscari ergo sum"

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Upstream or downstream....

    In my opinion, up or downstream gets the job done.
    Besides pinpoint placement, a downstream drift allows for much more range.
    I may cast 50-60 ft upstream on occasion (accurately), but can present almost double that downstream. (Not that you should).
    To me, there is nothing better than spotting a piggy in a bubble line, placing my fly in said line, a sending it (same day) to him.
    Timing his rises and having the package arrive just when he's ready for another bite.
    I'm getting worked up just writing this!!!!!!
    The Truckee has converted me to this style, because fish here are pretty spooky.
    Waving the rod around isn't sneaky enough. But drop a fly on the water and send it down. They just can't see ya coming.
    About a million misses led me to strip set, so ya, it's a learned thing.

    Jim
    Ultimately, it's not catching fish that satisfies, but knowing how.

    Bigfly

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