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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Truckee, CA.
    Posts
    2,147
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: Beginner nymphing?

    Since no one mentioned this, now seems good.
    Basically, there is a slower flow of water near shore, and along the bottom, called a laminar flow.
    Fish are in these spots to save energy.
    In colder water, and some higher pressure areas, they don't/won't move far for a bite.
    Here we work hard getting the fly into that bottom flow (the zone) on a high gradient river.
    Surface water may be 3-10 times faster than the bottom flow.
    When your fly/weight lands on the water, pick a bubble to track your indies speed against.
    At first your indy will move the same as the bubbles.
    Then as the flies/weight sink, you will see the indy slow down. (sink time)
    The closer you get flies to the bottom, the slower the water, and the slower the indy.
    As I said before, raise the indy 4-6" till the bubbles start to float faster than it.
    Another small adjust and you may see a small "pillow" of water form upstream of the indy.
    Another adjust and you will see the indy slow more still. The slower water is "grabing your fly".
    To me, that's when it kind of looks like my indy is in slow motion. Bubbles passing it by.
    One more adjust and you may see "ticking" of split shot/fly hitting rocks.
    Now you are fishing! (Provided you have the right fly)
    Some "ticks" may be takes. Do not rod set up, just do a little downstream/towards shore twitch.
    If you only twitch it 6" and if no one is home, you can continue your drift.
    The more you keep your fly in the water, and in the zone, the more fish you meet.
    I enjoy watching a client dial this in on there own, 6" at a time.
    Often, after yet another 6" adjust, suddenly there's a fish!
    If your fly line causes drag on the system, due to late mends, eddies, or whatever, the fly will swing up out of the zone. Now you're not fishing.
    Perfect this and then post fish pictures. Just keep them in the water to do this.
    No "bank pics" or squeezers please.
    Hope it helps;

    Jim
    Last edited by Bigfly; 04-06-2011 at 07:40 PM.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Beginner nymphing?

    Everybody is on it here.

    My only add is.. Take a trip to the San Juan get a guide and float the river. I think that took my "Nymphing" experience to a new level about 5 years ago.

    The guide will tie on #22's and #20's in tandem and tell you to set the hook when you have no clue as to why. After a day or two of this you begin to see "6th sence" what a nymphing strike is. My last trip (with Larry) our guide saw far more takes than I and I consider myself beyond the beginner stage of nymphing. So you are always learning.

    Plus, man it is fun to land a 20" Bow or Brown on a #22 hook. That experience will make you a nymph fishing addict.

  3. #13

    Default Re: Beginner nymphing?

    A wise man once said that nymphing was like a Oujia board. You never quite know if you are in touch with the other world.

    The idea of nymphing is to get a drag free float with a sunken fly that has decended to the trout's feeding level. Although trout will take nymphs at the surface, I consider that dry fly fishing. A dragging nymph is no better than a dragging dry. You can also swim a nymph if there is subaquatic activity that calls for that. This is more of a wet fly technique.

    So the great game is how do I get my fly down to the fish,stay intouch with the fly and avoid drag. One sytem of using an indicator does it better than any I know. This is the right angle rig. The original called for a 7.5 ft to 9 ft leader of 3x or 4x. At the end you clinch not on floating yarn to act as the indicator. You can then attach a tippet by clinch knotting the tippet above the indicator on the leader. The tippet can be anywhere from six inches to ten feet depending on the depth you want to fish. The weighting on the tippet and the concomitant size of the indicator will depend on conditions.

    You then work your line and casts to keep the the indicator floating drag free as if it were a dry fly. don't depend on the indicator to register hits. I believe that most of the time when an indicator moves the fish is already partially hooked. Even the best systemwill produce more strikes than you will ever realize happened. A good pair of sun glasses helps to see through the water. Any flash down there could indicate a strike even if the indicator doesn't move.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    1,966

    Default Re: Beginner nymphing?

    When I learned indicator nymphing, the instruction I read (from several sources) said to keep the leader length within 5 or six inches of the water depth and keep the bottom element (fly or weight) in regular contact with the bottom. The rig was then cast up and across and mended so the indicator began the drift upstream of the fly(s)/weight, came even, or directly above the the flys in the target area (where you think the fish are) for a short drift and are then picked up and recast once the indicator gets downstream of the flys. The rod tip must follow and point at the indicator as it drifts. There can be no slack: line is gathered in as the indicator drifts closer and fed out as the indicator passes. The strike is a mere tightening of the line or a slight lift for any change in the indicator's drift. This should hook a strike or clear a bottom snag. The drifts are kept short so you're in close contact with the fly.
    I see where this is very different from the way the method is taught these days.

    "Every [child] has the right to a first fish. On this particular planet, no man is granted a greater privilege than to be present and to assist in the realization of this moment". Bill Heavey

  5. #15

    Default Re: Beginner nymphing?

    Quote Originally Posted by JoJer View Post
    When I learned indicator nymphing, the instruction I read (from several sources) said to keep the leader length within 5 or six inches of the water depth and keep the bottom element (fly or weight) in regular contact with the bottom. The rig was then cast up and across and mended so the indicator began the drift upstream of the fly(s)/weight, came even, or directly above the the flys in the target area (where you think the fish are) for a short drift and are then picked up and recast once the indicator gets downstream of the flys. The rod tip must follow and point at the indicator as it drifts. There can be no slack: line is gathered in as the indicator drifts closer and fed out as the indicator passes. The strike is a mere tightening of the line or a slight lift for any change in the indicator's drift. This should hook a strike or clear a bottom snag. The drifts are kept short so you're in close contact with the fly.
    I see where this is very different from the way the method is taught these days.
    Actually, the water you're fishing will determine whether or not you use a method something like that. If I'm fishing a short, deeper pocket and can get close, that's pretty much how I do it. Another place where I'll fish it like that is where a riffle drops abruptly into deeper water. Trout hang right under that lip, often lying in water two or three feet deep right below where the underwater "bar's" lower edge is. I want to cast up into the shallow riffle water so that the indicator is above the flies, and time it so that the indicator is just slightly below the flies when they drop off that lip, and I want the indicator to be just a little higher on the line than what I think the depth is right below the drop off. Then, after fishing that lip to my satisfaction, I move the indicator farther up the line, move downstream a few feet, and make my cast to where the flies land slightly above the edge of the lip with indicator slightly upstream. The flies still drop off the lip well, but the indicator will not be in position to easily detect a strike at that point...but I've already pounded the lip, so I'm no longer looking for a strike at that point. The flies sink into the slow water under the lip while the indicator drifts downstream. The indicator as much as anything pulls the flies out of that slow water under the lip, and then the flies are on the bottom to drift down through the run below, while the indicator is downstream of them in position to show any take well.

    But in bigger, longer runs where you might be forced to make longer casts and longer drifts, I want the indicator to be a good 1.5 times the depth higher on the line, and I want it doing exactly what Bigfly described. I love seeing that indicator showing the split shot ticking the bottom.

    It took years, but I also finally developed what my flyfishing mentor was trying to have me do...divide your attention between the indicator and where you think your flies are on the bottom. I can watch for a side flashing, or a bit of white of the inside of the trout's mouth, or a shadowy movement on the bottom while still seeing the indicator. And I get some fish that way whose takes never showed on the indicator. Of course, that requires clear water and being able to fish a fairly short line.

  6. #16

    Default Re: Beginner nymphing?

    Quote Originally Posted by JoJer View Post
    When I learned indicator nymphing, the instruction I read (from several sources) said to keep the leader length within 5 or six inches of the water depth and keep the bottom element (fly or weight) in regular contact with the bottom. The rig was then cast up and across and mended so the indicator began the drift upstream of the fly(s)/weight, came even, or directly above the the flys in the target area (where you think the fish are) for a short drift and are then picked up and recast once the indicator gets downstream of the flys. The rod tip must follow and point at the indicator as it drifts. There can be no slack: line is gathered in as the indicator drifts closer and fed out as the indicator passes. The strike is a mere tightening of the line or a slight lift for any change in the indicator's drift. This should hook a strike or clear a bottom snag. The drifts are kept short so you're in close contact with the fly.
    I see where this is very different from the way the method is taught these days.

    There's more than one way to skin a cat. You do what works for the situation.

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