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Thread: Wading boots?

  1. #11

    Default Re: Wading boots?

    Korker Fan here... (sorry Alligator )

    I have a pair of shoes. Lighter than the boots and only once a two years did I feel I needed better ancle support. If you are rock hopping and feel you need the ancle supports the get the boots. My wife has the open toe korkers for even less weight. She loves them. She doesn't wade up and down streams much anymore so the light weight of open toes has her hooked.

    I use Felt with Studs and switch to rubber sole when I hike in. She has pure felt.

    Thats was my two bits...

    Crittergetter

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Parts Unknown
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    230

    Default Re: Wading boots?

    Another korkers guy here! I went with the redsides as i have seen the knobs break off. I like to keep it simple. Awsome boots...if i were you i wouldnt even look at the simms boots...

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Northern California
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    Default Re: Wading boots?

    Quote Originally Posted by alligator View Post
    OK, we have Korkers fans. But any feedback on the Simms models?
    I just gave a few selling points about the Korkers. I'm actually still using studded felt and unstudded felt soled Patagonia boots. Until California outlaws them, I won't give up my felts. Currently combating aquatic invasive species like Didymo and New Zealand Mudsnails is not high on the state's priority list.

    As for Simms boots. I tested a pair of Freestone Streamtread boots when they were first released. The regional Simms rep at the time had demo boots for industry people. When wading through small to medium gravel like substrate, slipping was not an issue. When wading through smaller freestone substrate, the soles still held. When the substrate got larger, slippage started to happen. My plain felt soles would had held.

    With the addition of the first generation of carbide studs (not the Star Cleats), the grip improved, but not to the point where my confidence level would be there to cross a 100 yard stretch in knee deep water with a moderate current.

    To be fair, I have not tried the other soles from the other manufacturers.

    Dennis

  4. Default Re: Wading boots?

    I picked up the Orvis Ultralight Riverguard boots with the studded soles and couldn't be happier. Traction is great and they are comfortable! I haven't tried the Korkers, but I am sure they are great as well

  5. #15

    Default Re: Wading boots?

    Alligator,

    Theres a fly shop in blaine called the fly angler/ thorne bros. They have a really nice shop and they carry simms and korkers i believe.

  6. #16

    Default Re: Wading boots?

    i just bought a pair of simms headwaters wading boots with the new vibram rubber soles and fished them once in a sierra river last week, without the use of studs. my original thought was for the riversheds but i couldn't justify the added cost. i was amazed how well they gripped. and they fit my feet well too, much nicer than my orvis henrys fork II felt soled boots. they LOOK beefy. they also really seemed to offer much better support for my ankles too. and it was really nice WALKING down needle and leaf-covered banks instead of sliding as i would have with my felts.

    understand, the river rock i was walking on was broken granite or small to medium sized boulders, free of algae this time of the year but i did drag my boots on smooth underwater rock and they were impossible to slide. besides a web belt and a retractor, it was my first purchase of anything from simms.

    i might try adding studs later depending on how traction holds up during the year. i don't usually fish our tailwaters where bowling ball rocks with algae are found, a place where studs would probably be required. my fly shop guy said the star cleats are $39 and he should be getting the newer aluminum ones soon. i asked the difference, he replied mainly softer metal and $10 cheaper.

    eric
    fresno, ca.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Rock River, Wyoming
    Posts
    527

    Post My thoughts on Wading and boots?

    I've been watching this topics and similar ones in the forums now for a couple of years and thought I'd add some input that I've gleaned from the internet coupled with my experiences on the water and working fly shops. First let me ask a question as thus far I've not seen anything that really solves the problem of drift boats and cleats! How do you handle this problem? Have you seen any really good solutions other than adding some really tough floor covering or removing cleated boots prior to getting back in? Of course the strap on Korkers are an option but just brainstorming I've tought about coming up with some velcro attached cleat covers also. Any ideas?

    Here's a list of great input links on this subject one of which is very appropo and from this forum last year:

    My Wading Boot Blues - None of the wading boots I owned fit my bill for a perfect pair of wading boots - Global FlyFisher super wading boot article and the pros and cons of various boots plus boots in general.

    Felt soles - Global FlyFisher replacing soles by the same author! Another great one!

    How to Make Cleated Sole Wading Boots | eHow.com Quicky how to on installing DIY studs in inexpensive boots.

    Strap on cleats? great forum string from the folks who know!

    From all I've read and know I've concluded that the wading boot sole problems are in flux and will be for some time. Given that and the rapidly changing state of the art, I've decided to stick with what I have for the time being, an old pair of felt soled boots, while supplementing that with some DIY and very low cost hiking boots from the sale rack at a discount store with added cleats/stove bolts as per the DIY article above. (I first heard about doing this from a customer who was on a limited budget and could not aford the Weinbrenners, Danners and Simms that we sold) He indicated that he'd go through a pair of the DIY boots every few months but at an overall cost of under $20 plus an hour of his time, it was really worth it as even the best boots just didn't last that well. (see the articles above from global)

    I'm thinking seriously about picking up a pair of the Korker strap on cleated Sandals and will wear these over inexpensive boots when there's a bit of hiking involved or when fishing in and out of a boat. One other solution I've tried which works somewhat is a pair of velcro strap secured, wading boots, I found a few years back. These are off and on in a flash and so makes a pretty good boat boot but alas they are felt soled so I suppose I cold remove the cleated felts and add cleated rubber to them. Last let's not forget the marriage made in heaven or using a wading staff along with the best traction you an afford or find!
    http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=24405&dateline=129884  8088
    Great Fishing
    Der Alt Jaeger
    Chuck S

    "I've traveled many roads and some weren't paved."
    Will Rodgers

    http://fishing-folks.blogspot.com/

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Missouri City (near Houston), Texas
    Posts
    1,262

    Default Re: My thoughts on Wading and boots?

    Quote Originally Posted by chuck s View Post
    . . . thus far I've not seen anything that really solves the problem of drift boats and cleats. How do you handle this problem? Have you seen any really good solutions other than adding some really tough floor covering or removing cleated boots prior to getting back in? Of course the strap on Korkers are an option but . . .
    I'm thinking seriously about picking up a pair of the Korker strap on cleated Sandals and will wear these over inexpensive boots when there's a bit of hiking involved or when fishing in and out of a boat. . .
    With respect, I think you're overly complicating your life. The simple (& elegant) solution is to buy a pair of Korkers - not the strap-on sandals you're considering, but a pair of their boots with interchangeable soles. They come in all price ranges, and are quite reasonable considering the non-interchangeable sole competition. With those, you merely remove the interchangeable cleated soles you're using and replace them with a boat-friendly interchangeable sole. In fact, I believe Korkers makes an interchangeable sole specifically for boats. I understand the latest model doesn't even require a tool and taking off the boot to replace the sole.
    On the whole, I'd rather be in Wyoming . . .
    Fly2:

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Rock River, Wyoming
    Posts
    527

    Default Re: Wading boots?

    Fly2Fish, I'm a firm believer that the more thinking, planning, etc one put into a sport the more one get from it so for me this is just part of the enjoyment. Here the weather is still marginal at best and I've loads of time for forum checking and posting so for me this isn't complicated but rather fun. I have seen those Korkers you mention and do think that they are on the right track but for my tastes they look a tad clunky, a smidge inelegant and sort of prototypish at this stage of the game. I'm betting that either Korker or another wading boot manufacturer will soon have something out there that solves problems and is a bit more functional without all the klunk factor. In fact, rereading your reply, perhaps they've, Korkers, have already improved the boot over the model I saw awhile back. I do think that Korker and the quick off and on soles will be the future!
    http://www.theflyfishingforum.com/forums/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=24405&dateline=129884  8088
    Great Fishing
    Der Alt Jaeger
    Chuck S

    "I've traveled many roads and some weren't paved."
    Will Rodgers

    http://fishing-folks.blogspot.com/

  10. #20

    Default Re: Wading boots?

    Quote Originally Posted by chuck s View Post
    Fly2Fish, I'm a firm believer that the more thinking, planning, etc one put into a sport the more one get from it so for me this is just part of the enjoyment. Here the weather is still marginal at best and I've loads of time for forum checking and posting so for me this isn't complicated but rather fun. I have seen those Korkers you mention and do think that they are on the right track but for my tastes they look a tad clunky, a smidge inelegant and sort of prototypish at this stage of the game. I'm betting that either Korker or another wading boot manufacturer will soon have something out there that solves problems and is a bit more functional without all the klunk factor. In fact, rereading your reply, perhaps they've, Korkers, have already improved the boot over the model I saw awhile back. I do think that Korker and the quick off and on soles will be the future!
    Klunk, that's what I thought before I got my hands on a pair. You might want to try on a pair of Korkers, as the Chromes I'm wearing are very light. They're built with a reinforced (welded) toe, and while they're light and maneuverable, they really do well when exposed to a beating that would damage less sturdy boots. For certain, other manufacturers will come up with good boots as well. Just a matter of time.

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