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Old 02-05-2014, 01:20 PM
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Default Tips for Taking Better Photos

I saw this link over on Moldy Chum and thought some of you would also be interested in reading this advice on taking better photos:

40 Tips to Take Better Photos

If you have a tip for taking better photos, why not post it as a reply!

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Old 02-05-2014, 01:24 PM
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Default Re: Tips for Taking Better Photos

My number one tip for a better photo:

Make sure my face isn't in it!
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Old 02-05-2014, 01:36 PM
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Default Re: Tips for Taking Better Photos

Indoors, use a bounce flash. Outdoors, use a fill flash.
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Old 02-05-2014, 01:54 PM
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Default Re: Tips for Taking Better Photos

My two cents.
1). If it is a grip and grin, get the sun glasses off of your face.

2). Hold the fish close to the water if not in the water. Give the fish a quick dip into the water. Getting the pic with water droplets coming off adds something special to the pic. It also saves the fish (to be caught another day) if he decides to make a break from your clutch.

3). Unless you are eating the fish, placing a fish you plan on releasing onto a bed of rocks is not good for the fish. I see these pics often.

Now, lets see some pics.....
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Old 02-05-2014, 01:55 PM
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Default Re: Tips for Taking Better Photos

Quote:
Originally Posted by mridenour View Post
My number one tip for a better photo:

Make sure my face isn't in it!
But Mike, I like the way you always seem to cut the top of peoples heads off, gives the photo that personal touch.

Larry
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Old 02-05-2014, 02:06 PM
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Default Re: Tips for Taking Better Photos

Fish scales tend to reflect light. Even a glint of light on the wet skin can completely overexpose a picture. If youre taking a picture of your buddy with a fish, have the sunlight hitting at an angle (just imagine the fish is a mirror).

Don't hover your shadow over a fish when taking the picture. Not only does it look distracting, the cameras metering will adjust the exposure for the shade it sees and everywhere there's sun in the photo will be blown out.

The photo is secondary, the health of the fish is primary. If you can get the shot quickly with little harm to the fish, go for it. Otherwise, don't.

When I fish I have my camera in a very accessible location. If I am landing a photo worthy specimen, I'll have the camera out, neck strap on and camera on before I even get the fish to hand.

Lots more to discuss regarding good photography and fishing

---------- Post added at 02:06 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:57 PM ----------

A very good friend of mine is a professional photographer and fly fisher. Check out his work. Flyfishing - Curtis Mix Photography

When we fished together in his boat, he always kept the live well full of fresh cold water. we would put the fish in it and get the photo all thought out... sun position, background, everything. If you look at his photos youll see one commonality. Whenever he takes a photo he says, "don't look at me. Look at your fish" I think this is a more pleasing look than posing for the camera. He makes TOO big a deal out of the photography... But I must say, at the end of the day, Im glad he does. Because he snaps some really nice memories.
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Old 02-05-2014, 03:02 PM
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Default Re: Tips for Taking Better Photos

Underexpose.

With modern digital cameras, you can almost always fix an underexposed photo.

An overexposed photo, one that has any of its channels 'blown', can't be fixed. At least, the areas that are blown can't be recovered. You may be able to salvage the image by cropping.
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Old 02-05-2014, 08:34 PM
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Default Re: Tips for Taking Better Photos

I'm nowhere near a pro or photo expert, but I've found a polarizing filter makes up for some of my lack of skill by bringing more contrast and better color to my photos. I mean, we all wear polarized glasses around the water, so if we're taking water and fish photos, shouldn't we use that filter? It works for me. I've recently even found one for my point and shoot!
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Old 02-05-2014, 10:55 PM
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Default Re: Tips for Taking Better Photos

Use the rule of thirds. It will make a huge difference in the look of your photos. Use it for the main subject, but also use it for things like horizons.

Learn to use a setting besides the automatic one. "P" will give you a lot more control regarding what you capture and the way it is captured. Av is even better.

Increase shutter speed to freeze the water. Decrease it to give it that soft, cottony look (but set the camera on something when you shoot or it will be blurry).

A low number aperture like f/2.8 or f/4 will narrow the depth of field and will focus the viewers eye on your subject, a high number one like f/16 will increase the depth of field and give you sharpness near and far.

Use a "french" tilt (raise one end of the camera 15-25 degrees) to imply movement and action in your pics. Neat angles are so much better than static looking boring shots.

I don't shoot many fish pics when I'm on the water....

Click the image to open in full size.

Photos of pretty people are a lot nicer to look at than photos of ugly people. Try to remember that and shoot accordingly.

Last edited by labradorguy; 02-06-2014 at 08:36 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 02-06-2014, 05:17 AM
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Default Re: Tips for Taking Better Photos

Quote:
Originally Posted by labradorguy View Post
[IMG][/IMG]
Oh I want to make a comment.......but I would rather be fishing
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