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Thread: How heavy do YOU tie & fish w/flytackle?

  1. #11
    Join Date
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    Default Re: How heavy do YOU tie & fish w/flytackle?

    Quote Originally Posted by bigjim5589 View Post
    Many if the flies I'm tying are on 1/0 or larger hooks.
    My surf crab flies with the XL lead eyes are all on 3/0
    They're a serious chuck&duck with the 10wt
    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements.Ē --- Horace Kephart

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  3. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
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    Default Re: How heavy do YOU tie & fish w/flytackle?

    Quote Originally Posted by karstopo View Post
    ---------- Post added at 09:16 AM ---------- Previous post was at 07:17 AM ----------

    [/COLOR]Manic Tackle Project, Fly Fishing Article by Rene Vaz - Sink Rate of Nymphs in Rivers - Sink Rates of Nymphs - Testing The Theories
    Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk
    Good link and love the chart, itís something Iíve been pondering a lot this past summer with tungsten beads and eyes relative the brass/lead weighting of my past. One of the reasons Iíve found it easier to ďlighten upĒ on the ties is indeed due to the use of tungsten. One can design smaller and thus very depth effective wets with the higher density metal. Thereís only so small one can get with fly proportions using lead or brass and at some point the overall size interferes with sink rate and adds drag in current. Itís made a huge difference and Iím looking forward to playing with the ribbed nymph bodies that have finally swam across ocean and are widely available here.

    Whoída guessed the more dense metal wouldíve made standard flycasting more pleasurable? Iím digginí the way this plays out, itís strange, but nice. We need more folks like Yoshi analyzing this stuff, itís tough just to find the weights associated with different brands and styles.

    The 10 wt striper pursuit and saltwater in general was one area I reckoned the heaviest eyes and heads would be found. What surprised me was to see stuff like this being used in the Spey area as I have never cast such tackle or appreciated the seemingly awesome energy of it. Have previously read Ardís blog posts on leader structure and purpose, but reading again I put some context to the weights and numbers involved and really believe the large Sculpin Helmut on Spey is indeed akin to a dry fly cast on other tackle. Serious carrying capacity there and well made videos, too. Fly action and observation reminiscent of a plug carver applied to flyfishing is refreshing, BTW. It seems with the typical emphasis on casting those things get a bit overlooked by many. Not ďspeaking speyĒ too much looks like an advantage at the end of the line

    Given the amount of interest in Czech nymphing, high stick, and modern (long) leader fishing in just about any flyfishing topic or discourse, one would think the NA nymphers would be more involved with the heavy stuff. The Euro and competitive arena has fly boxes functioning almost like tool boxes with regard to weight and designation. I wouldnít be surprised to see heavy, short distance fishing becoming more popular in the future with flyrods. Untapped fishery, especially in some faster pocket waters.

    Regarding form, not much of a jighead guy myself on any tackleÖI prefer to choose my hook, attach my own weight, and never trust the ability of folks to pour without messing with the wire temper. So snobby & pretentious of me, ainít it? Itíll be interesting to see if the heavier stuff sticks around, in what forms, or if it stays mostly with the heavier tackle. I found this trend in flyfishing to be fascinating since the dumbbell eyes first came to be, hence my inquiry.

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  5. #13
    Join Date
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    Default Re: How heavy do YOU tie & fish w/flytackle?

    Quote Originally Posted by knotjoe View Post
    Good link and love the chart, itís something Iíve been pondering a lot this past summer with tungsten beads and eyes relative the brass/lead weighting of my past. One of the reasons Iíve found it easier to ďlighten upĒ on the ties is indeed due to the use of tungsten. One can design smaller and thus very depth effective wets with the higher density metal. Thereís only so small one can get with fly proportions using lead or brass and at some point the overall size interferes with sink rate and adds drag in current. Itís made a huge difference and Iím looking forward to playing with the ribbed nymph bodies that have finally swam across ocean and are widely available here.

    Whoída guessed the more dense metal wouldíve made standard flycasting more pleasurable? Iím digginí the way this plays out, itís strange, but nice. We need more folks like Yoshi analyzing this stuff, itís tough just to find the weights associated with different brands and styles.

    The 10 wt striper pursuit and saltwater in general was one area I reckoned the heaviest eyes and heads would be found.

    Yes, that chart by Yoshi was eye opening. So I can tie with less weight, easier to cast patterns and still get the fly down faster than a much heavier chunk of lead so long as I use tungsten? Who woulda thunk it!

    I sling element 74 pretty much every time I hit the salt. While redfish and speckled trout can and do feed at or near the surface, more often than not they are grabbing breakfast or lunch near the bottom structure. A 3/16Ē tungsten bead, something meant for a size 6-10 hook (Iím using size 2 or 4 hooks) is all it takes to rocket shrimp, crab, or baitfish patterns straight to the bottom.

    And as far as natural movement goes, putting the bead forward like a jig weight represents the natural motion of the forage like shrimp and small baitfish most of the time better than weighting it further back in true clouser style or leaving it unweighted and using sinking line to get it down. Iíve spent decades on the water plus watched enough of these underwater videos of fish like speckled trout, redfish and flounder feed to understand how fish feed. Most of the time, the natural bait isnít staying on a depth plane, but darting up and down in the water column and the predators are picking the forage off on the rise or fall. Redfish nose along the bottom and hope to scare up shrimp, fin fish and swimming crabs hunkered up against the bottom structure. Once the little frightened shrimp pops off the bottom, just like with a jig head action, the redfish picks it off. Whether Iím tying with brass, lead, or tungsten, most everything thing that is weighted is weighted to rise head up and fall head down except my shrimp or crabs which are the reverse to mimic how they swim.

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