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  1. Default seating your ferrules

    When you guys put together your rods what method do you use to make sure they don't come apart and your rod breaks. Do you use wax(what type?), no wax, tape, or something else.

    I know this is a big concern for people with many piece rods.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Missouri City (near Houston), Texas
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    Default Re: seating your ferrules

    Quote Originally Posted by eaglesfn68 View Post
    When you guys put together your rods what method do you use to make sure they don't come apart and your rod breaks. Do you use wax(what type?), no wax, tape, or something else.

    I know this is a big concern for people with many piece rods.
    Funny you asked - I've had the same questions and just finished researching them out. While some rod manufacturers suggest wax for ferrule lubrication, others say that's the worst thing you can use, since it tends to attract grit which can scratch the graphite causing stress points potentially breaking the rod and in any case wax build-up can distort the ferrule clearances stressing the female ferrule and possibly cracking it under strain. From what I've read, the consensus seems to be to use lubricants specifically designed for ferrules like U-40 or Renzetti Ferrule Lubes.

    As additional protection for keeping the rod sections from coming apart under casting leverage, most of the thought on this seems to come from the Spey casters, since the combination of two hands and longer rods results in greater leverage on the rod ferrule joints with a greater likelihood of ferrule slippage and separation during a heavy cast. The standard school of thought there seems to be to use electric tape (3M All Season recommended because of less likelihood of tape residue damaging the rod finish) wrapped around each ferrule joint. If done carefully, the tape can be re-wound and re-used, cutting down further on possible rod finish damage which is increased each time the tape is completely removed. The second and more recent method for preventing ferrule joint separation is by using short sections of surgical latex tubing to slightly stretch-fit over each ferrule joint much like a compression bandage. When not in use, the tubing can be rolled back over the female ferrule, to be rolled back down again over the male ferrule section when the rod is next re-assembled.

    I am in the process of trying to remove the wax from my rods' ferrules (any suggestions much appreciated!) and coating them with U-40 Ferrule Lube, as well as adding short latex tubing sections for preventing ferrule slippage, for a fly-fishing trip I have planned for mid-July, and I'll report back on how well this new set-up worked when I get back.
    On the whole, I'd rather be in Wyoming . . .
    Fly2:

  3. Default Re: seating your ferrules

    this all sounds ridiculous to me. I mean cant i fish by just putting my rod together. My family fly fishes and they don't use anything to put the ferrules together and they have never had anything break. I mean just by checking your ferrules every couple of casts or so should work shouldn't it.

    and i do mostly roll casting so wouldn't that make it less likely for the ferrules to come apart since there is not as much stress on the rod.

  4. #4

    Default Re: seating your ferrules

    I've always just stuck the pieces together too.
    The other flies, n., pl.
    1. dry flies, nymphs, emergers, terrestrials, streamers, etc.
    2. What I use when a black #10 woolly bugger isn't catching.

  5. Default Re: seating your ferrules

    but if your have a 4 piece rod it might be a bigger deal than a 2 piece rod.

  6. Default Re: seating your ferrules

    Try putting your rod together with each section at a 90 degree angle to the other and turning them inline as you seat the sections. If your rod still gets loose you may want to try some ferule wax used sparingly. If you wax your ferule, you only need to do it once or twice a season, not every time you use the rod. Remember, less is more.

    Keep in mind that temperature changes can cause the ferules to loosen, so if the problem seems to occur in the evening when it starts to cool down, or mid morning when it starts to warm up you might want to simply reseat your rod.

    The other thing to watch is if you're casting like a nut.

    If all else fails, you can try going through the process that Fly2Fish spelled out above.

    Personally, I'd send the rod back to the manufacturer if ferule slippage became a nuisance. If it's a big box rod made in China or Korea your probably just out of luck.
    "If people don't occasionally walk away from you shaking their heads, you're doing something wrong." John Gierach

  7. #7

    Default Re: seating your ferrules

    a quarter turn to seat the ferrules on my graphite rods...straight on (no turn) with my bamboo...I don't normally use ferrule wax except if I have a loose ferrule.. I will use wax to tighten it up. That really shouldn't be a problem with graphite though...happens more often with bamboo

  8. #8
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    Default Re: seating your ferrules

    I've always used a little nose grease when I put my rod together, & after it's together I'll grab the tip section lightly & tap the butt section on my boot toe a few times to insure it's tight...........
    I've never had to do it but as long as we're on the subject , How do you separate a rod that has been stuck too tightly together. What's the best way to grab it & will heat & ice work???

  9. Default Re: seating your ferrules

    Quote Originally Posted by FISHN50 View Post
    How do you separate a rod that has been stuck too tightly together. What's the best way to grab it & will heat & ice work???
    What works for me is to hold the rod behind my knees with the my legs close together. Then I slowly and evenly move my knees out and pull the rod apart.
    "If people don't occasionally walk away from you shaking their heads, you're doing something wrong." John Gierach

  10. #10
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    Jun 2007
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    Default Re: seating your ferrules

    Keep in mind that the "100% best solution" I suggested below is the closest we all have now to a perfect solution (unless someone else can come up with a better solution, which I haven't seen yet). For myself, I've always before followed Joe D's procedure with no problems, i.e., nose grease works great. However, the procedure I outlined below is really not much extra effort considering the cost of modern high-end fly rods, which is why I am now trying it out.

    I'd also add that Joe D's procedure for freeing up frozen ferrule joints works equally well for frozen collapsible wading staff joints. The only thing I'd add is that the applicatiion of ice to the frozen joint before the behind-the-knees force application will enhance its effectiveness.

    Thanks for your suggestions, Joe D.
    On the whole, I'd rather be in Wyoming . . .
    Fly2:

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