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Thread: COLOR OF FLY LINES---DRY/FLOATING ONLY

  1. Default COLOR OF FLY LINES---DRY/FLOATING ONLY

    OK, guys lets have your opinion on this one.

    I am in the process of writing a article for a publication related to this question.

    Do you think that the color of the line makes a difference or not. In that it may or may not spook fish ? by the act of fishing or casting.

    For the record my view is that it does not, but l would like to hear your choices, and some reason why you make that choice.
    I need to have some % data for the record.

    Dry/floating line only ok.

    Davy.
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  2. Default

    Davy:

    Great topic for discussion!!!

    We discuss this topic in my fly fishing class. I express to them (and I believe but not convinced) that it does not make any difference what the line color is. After all... when you cast you're not supposed to cast over the head of the fish anyway. Especially in my kind of fishing which is in small trout streams. The same applies to many other types of fly fishing... Bonefishing, Redfishing, etc...

    Now, having said that… on all of my small stream outfits I have camo lines (gray, buckskin or olive). Since I am not completely convinced beyond a reasonable show of doubt, I've decided... "Why take the chance?" It certainly doesn’t hurt anything.

    I also dress in earth tone colors. Olives and browns. Never bright colors. I use matte black tools. Never shinny ones. Now does all this really make a difference? I can't say that I'm convinced one way or the other. But I do it because it makes me feel good about what I'm doing.

    When it gets down to it… I believe in confidence. If you have confidence in what you’re doing it will breed success. If you have doubts in your methods life can be hard on you. Confidence that you have the right skills, flies and fly line can help create a successful catch. So if you want to spend big bucks for the camo line because it makes you feel better then go for it. If you want to spend big bucks on Aqua Design clothes because it makes you feel good then go for it. If it feels good do it. Your confidence will breed success.

    OK... now I think beginning casters should use bright fluorescent fly lines. They need to see what's going on the air. This is how they'll learn. Now... if the bright color is so easy for the caster to see, does it make it easier for the fish to see? I can't say for sure because I've never asked one.

    No doubt that the bright colored lines are the biggest sellers so it must not be making that much of a difference.

    I think that the ONLY way to accurately answer this question is to ask the fish... and he ain't gonna say! :lol:

    Steve

  3. Default FLY LINE COLOR

    Steve,
    Yes, l also agree with that you say. For the newcomers to the sport a hi vis line is a great asset for them, both in casting and being able to have a good visual when it comes to learning the subtle art of line mending, which is my choice for that learning skill.

    So too, casting a line of any color over a fish is not a good option, l do not believe that the color of a fly line whilst in the air will make any difference.
    We did some tests years ago with that one and formed the opinion that the line was a solid object that light could not pass through, in that respect it may cause a shadow to be thrown , if the relative angle of the light was correct.
    We also found that the shadow cast onto the bed of the river would also spook fish at times, regardless of the color of that line.

    A very famous angler by the name of Hugh Falkus, now departed had the view that a white line was best. His opinion was based on the fact that many fish eating birds had white or close to it on the underside. I asked him one day about that and said that a cormorant differed a great deal from that, his answer was that it was a diving bird and not one that caught prey from above, I accepted that answer.

    From a personal point of view l do not like hi vis lines, they for me just stick out like a sore thumb, and l do believe that they can mesmorise you to a point you will not see the fly line move when a fish takes the fly, without of course indicators, which would be your point of vision.

    I do like white and other more natural shades that blend with the enviroment, olives, browns grey etc.

    Ok you guys lets have some more input on this one.

    Confidence for sure and, as you say we are not the fish and neither can we get a answer. :lol:
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  4. Default

    For fly fishing in Texas lakes I like the Scientific Anglers floating lines, the ones I've used are all green, and I haven't found that the fish care about line color. Since 95% of my fly fishing is in warmwater lakes that is what I base my opinion on. Since only 5% of my fishing time is devoted to trout I don't consider myself knowledgeable enough about it to offer a view on line colors for trout fishing. Steve and Davy are the experts on that.

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