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  1. Default What does it mean to protect your tippet

    So new to fly fishing. I see this saying sometimes. Usually in relation to rod action. I think its referring to not having your tippet snap. Maybe someone can elighten me? I would hope we all are already trying to not break our tippets?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: What does it mean to protect your tippet

    That's pretty much what it means. No one intentionally seeks to break their tippet, but it happens. Very light tippets aid in limiting drag, but there is a compromise in breaking strength.

    Stiff rods & light tippets don't always work well together. Softer actions dampen the shock when the hook is set because they have more "give". Most folks who you'll hear use the term will be trout anglers who frequently use very light tippets but it can apply to other fishing.

    If you did any spin or baitcasting, a properly set drag on the reel helps keep from breaking line on hook sets, so similar. Something has to give.

    I often fish with a 10 wt & 20 lb tippets, and sometimes it can apply there too. Tarpon anglers bow to a jumping fish to protect the tippet and also to keep from breaking rods.
    Remember, no one likes to be behind the big truck, but that's better than being under it!

  3. #3

    Default Re: What does it mean to protect your tippet

    Quote Originally Posted by jayw2942 View Post
    So new to fly fishing. I see this saying sometimes. Usually in relation to rod action. I think its referring to not having your tippet snap. Maybe someone can elighten me? I would hope we all are already trying to not break our tippets?
    There are several situations in which you might hear the term "protect the tippet."

    The one you mention is that a soft or slow action rod has a more flexible tip that will give and "protect the tippet." So the rod tip flexes to absorb the shock of a sudden pull on the tippet.

    You can also use a lower drag setting to "protect the tippet" so the drag gives.

    If the fish jumps, you "bow" to the fish, lowering the rod and pushing toward the fish to give the fish slack line to "protect the tippet."

    You can use a section of "shock gum" which is an elastic placed between the fly line and the leader that will stretch to "protect the tippet."

    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

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  5. #4
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    Default Re: What does it mean to protect your tippet

    There are multiple products out there that help with "protecting" your tippet. On tail waters where light tippets are the norm, many anglers will use some kind of tippet protection. I often use the product below when teaching new fishers. Nothing worst than hooking a fish only to snap the tippet on the hookset or during the fight of landing the fish. This one floats so it is good for nymphing. A softer rod will also protect your tippet.

  6. #5
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    Default Re: What does it mean to protect your tippet

    What it means to me is to allow the fish to hook itself by grabbing my fly and trying to change direction and swim back to where it was prior to grabbing the fly. I learned a long time back not to 'strike' when a fish grabbed my fly. Ever since I trained myself to remain calm and not to try hooking them by striking I quit breaking tippets.

    Some fish still come undone from the hook but I don't miss any fish, they miss the hook if anything. That's the best way to protect your tippet I know of whether it's a 7X strand on a spring creek or 15 pound Maxima on a king salmon. Fish bites the fly, relax and see if it gets hooked and you will protect your tippets and knots too.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

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    Default Re: What does it mean to protect your tippet

    Graphite VS Fiberglass With Tim Rajeff: Video | Fly Fishing | Gink and Gasoline | How to Fly Fish | Trout Fishing | Fly Tying | Fly Fishing Blog

    I’ve broken tippets even heavier tippet on fish when I inadvertently clamped down on the fly line with my off hand and the fish surged or lunged in the opposite direction. This has for me always been before the fish gets on the reel and right after the fish takes the fly. A softer glass rod has an extra margin of safety over a stiffer graphite one but glass doesn’t necessarily prevent snapping a tippet. And the fish doesn’t have to be heavier than the tippet pound test rating to break the tippet.

    Once I get a fish on the reel, I feel much more certain that I can manage any powerful moves by the fish by bowing the rod, pointing the rod tip towards the fish and having the drag set right. But sometimes, at least for me, it can be tough to manage the line and rod right after the fish grabs the fly. My saltwater tippets run from 12 to 20 pounds and if the tippet doesn’t break the hook might bend open on a mismanaged fight.

    Just this last Friday, I busted the blood knot at the tippet to mid section. I didn’t see or feel the fish grab the fly and didn’t realize what was going on until the fish was rapidly accelerating in the opposite direction. I already had the rod pointed at the fish so all I could do was to try to extend my arms towards the running fish and release my grip on the fly line with my off hand, but I was too slow. Had the knot not failed, I bet the hook would have or maybe the 15# tippet at the fly.

    It’s more fun when I manage the fight better than that, but it’s hard to fathom every encounter going my way. Difficult fish definitely make things more interesting.
    Wherever you go, there you are.

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