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  1. #71
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Eastern Iowa
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    6,930

    Default Re: Lobbing tungsten - is it really fly fishing?

    In the end I am going to guess 95% of us draw a line somewhere on what constitutes "flyfishing" or we wouldn't even bother to do it the hard way. Maybe your line is fly casting live bait. I don't care to dredge the bottom with what IMO amounts to spin fishing tungsten jigs. No chance you will catch me drifting a bobber, and I think beading trout or salmon should be outlawed everywhere. But I won't expend a great deal of energy stressing it or judging others because it doesn't affect me in the least and it is a waste of my life worrying about it. Some of my friends here do these things and consider it real fly fishing. They don't need my approval. I insist they follow the laws game law and they should enjoy their version of the sport. "Improperly flyfishing" doesn't make my top ten list of problems on the water today. Not even close.

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  3. #72

    Default Re: Lobbing tungsten - is it really fly fishing?

    Quote Originally Posted by dillon View Post
    How long does it take to land a trout over 20" on that set up?
    As flyminded said my 3wt nymph rods have more a 5wt butt and mid sections. The softer tip helps protect light 5 & 6X tippet. It can come down to the creek also. If a fish gets into stronger current I have to be careful to not break off and steer them out of the current soon as possible. I realize tiring fish too much isn't good for them. In terms of time? Id say no longer than to land the same fish on a 5wt rod unless heavier tippet is being used. I have yet to see any fish Ive landed go belly up after carefully releasing them.

  4. #73
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Montrose, CO.
    Posts
    928
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Lobbing tungsten - is it really fly fishing?

    Quote Originally Posted by pdq5oh View Post
    As flyminded said my 3wt nymph rods have more a 5wt butt and mid sections. The softer tip helps protect light 5 & 6X tippet. It can come down to the creek also. If a fish gets into stronger current I have to be careful to not break off and steer them out of the current soon as possible. I realize tiring fish too much isn't good for them. In terms of time? Id say no longer than to land the same fish on a 5wt rod unless heavier tippet is being used. I have yet to see any fish Ive landed go belly up after carefully releasing them.
    Rarely will you ever see a fish die from lactic acid build up as it most frequently happens hours after release, even days according to some studies. The difference is a kept fish has 100% mortality. Lol. Fast in, fast back, equals best chance of survival. All we can do besides not fish.

    So I ask these passionate dry fly anglers what they do in the winter months when fish rarely feed on the surface and move into slow deep holes? Standing in the backyard snow in socks and shorts casting a line would be as productive as throwing a dry around here. Easier too; no iced guides, no drive home, and hot chocolate just a button away. I think I'm getting a new picture of how and why anglers become dry fly elites.

    Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk
    Nice fish! Do you have anymore pictures of it lying in the dirt?
    As publicity increases so does the propensity of tripping over yards of mono attached to a Dipsey sinker.

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  6. #74

    Default Re: Lobbing tungsten - is it really fly fishing?

    Quote Originally Posted by corn fed fins View Post
    Rarely will you ever see a fish die from lactic acid build up as it most frequently happens hours after release, even days according to some studies. The difference is a kept fish has 100% mortality. Lol. Fast in, fast back, equals best chance of survival. All we can do besides not fish.

    So I ask these passionate dry fly anglers what they do in the winter months when fish rarely feed on the surface and move into slow deep holes? Standing in the backyard snow in socks and shorts casting a line would be as productive as throwing a dry around here. Easier too; no iced guides, no drive home, and hot chocolate just a button away. I think I'm getting a new picture of how and why anglers become dry fly elites.
    In regard to the quickest reasonable amount of time to bring a trout to hand, a long rod is a poor lever. Stand-up tuna outfits are very short and stiff to put the screws to truly powerful fish. Dillon understands this, he is long a skilled user of two handed steelhead rods. I favor trout reels with actual drags over my former spring and pawl classics after convincing my self I land fish incrementally quicker using a drag setting, all else being equal. I have on several occasions been fishing a river and observing a large, handsome trout tilting and twisting its way toward me. Netting and attempting to revive has proven futile as these fish have been victims of unknowing upstream anglers playing with them to the point of lactic acid poisoning, possibly holding them aloft for not quick enough hero images and never even being aware of it...very irresponsible behavior toward our precious wild resources.

    I do not fish for trout in winter after browns have built their redds nor in too early spring for the rainbows sake. I believe in old fashioned closed seasons. But I sometimes do get an opportunity to ply my favorite craft by traveling to Florida or better yet, the Bahamas. Casting a sparse crab pattern to a tailing bonefish while attired in SPF clothing and sunscreen; that's my idea of winter fishing.

  7. #75
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Central Kentucky
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Re: Lobbing tungsten - is it really fly fishing?

    I have never found this book called"The Golden Rule Book of Fly Fishing" that so many speak of but i have found "It's All Fishing" and Chapter One is "As Long As It's Legal Enjoy It!" and Chapter Two is "Welcome To The New Age of Fly Fishing."
    -Steve


    "There is no greater fan of fly fishing than the worm."-Patrick f. McManus

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  9. #76

    Default Re: Lobbing tungsten - is it really fly fishing?

    Quote Originally Posted by corn fed fins View Post

    So I ask these passionate dry fly anglers what they do in the winter months when fish rarely feed on the surface and move into slow deep holes?
    November through March is actually my favorite time of the year for dry fly fishing. In search of year 'round trout fishing I moved to an area with relatively mild winters and several tailwaters and spring creeks. It's actually pretty nice, the bugs hatch most days sometime between noon to 3 and it's usually only baetis and/or midges. I can relax and get to the river when it's warmed up a little, and I only need to bring one small box of flies.
    I still nymph a fair amount, but when I have reliable dry fly fishing available pretty much 12 months of the year, it's hard not to seek it out. If I chose to live somewhere else it might be an entirely different story and my feelings on euro nymphing might be different.

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  11. Default Re: Lobbing tungsten - is it really fly fishing?

    When I was a kid, we used to high-stick nymphs using a cane pole in the Smoky Mountains. Is that Tenkara? Euro-nymphing? Cause if it ain’t, then I regret ever doing such an uncivilized thing.

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  13. #78
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Montrose, CO.
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    928
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    3

    Default Re: Lobbing tungsten - is it really fly fishing?

    Quote Originally Posted by flav View Post
    November through March is actually my favorite time of the year for dry fly fishing. In search of year 'round trout fishing I moved to an area with relatively mild winters and several tailwaters and spring creeks. It's actually pretty nice, the bugs hatch most days sometime between noon to 3 and it's usually only baetis and/or midges. I can relax and get to the river when it's warmed up a little, and I only need to bring one small box of flies.
    "Mild winter". I'm seeing a trend among the dry crowd. ... I guess standing in water that's 30 degrees warmer than the high for the month and flowing slower than the wind is blowing just doesn't jive with dry only guys. So what moisturizer do you all prefer? oke:

    Sent from my VS988 using Tapatalk
    Nice fish! Do you have anymore pictures of it lying in the dirt?
    As publicity increases so does the propensity of tripping over yards of mono attached to a Dipsey sinker.

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