Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33

Thread: Old Wright & McGill Rod

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    quiet corner, ct
    Posts
    8,504

    Default Re: Old Wright & McGill Rod

    Did this rod always come with two tips? why?
    'Cuz they bend....
    Use one too often and it will get bent (take a set)
    If you alternate it's less likely to happen

    To bend your's back...use direct heat from a hair drier and gently pull it back into shape

    Try the Hook and Hackle High Floater line.... good line ..good value
    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements. --- Horace Kephart

  2. #12

    Default Re: Old Wright & McGill Rod

    The Hook and Hackle High Floater line is their house brand (made by Cortland) and is the Cortland Classic Peach in a green color...it is less expensive than the Cortland and and Rio and I have used it and it performs just as well as the classic peach.

    As for using a hair dryer on your rod....I would not recommend such dry heat...you can easily damage the varnish and boo. there are other methods less extreme that I won't mention because the SAFEST way to fix your set is to take it to a pro.....you will be glad you did. I have fished bamboo 30 years and even I get nervous when I try to fix a set on a rod I really love and has sentimental value to me.

  3. Default Re: Old Wright & McGill Rod

    Thanks for all the info I am learning a lot about this. I will take your advise on this.

    Thanks again and I will let you know about the reel tomorrow.

    RayMO

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    quiet corner, ct
    Posts
    8,504

    Default Re: Old Wright & McGill Rod

    Respectfully, bamboo rods are not as fragile as many people may think
    They're stronger than graphite
    That's why there's so many vintage rods around
    By all means take the rod to a pro if you're nervous about fixing it yourself, but they're not going to do anything you can't do at home
    A traditional way to straighten a set was in the heat over a toaster
    I would recommend something not quite so warm
    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements. --- Horace Kephart

  5. Default Re: Old Wright & McGill Rod

    The set in the one tip is pretty bad because my uncle stored it in such a way that the tip was bent (can you believe that). The rod was just setting in the corner in an old shed with the tip bending against a rafter. Who knows how many years (talking decades here) he was 90 when he passed on. I will definitly take it to a pro I hope it can be fixed. The other tip has no set at all, I doubt if it was ever used.

  6. #16

    Default Re: Old Wright & McGill Rod

    I've taken out many sets. It's really not that hard. I boil some water and use the stream from it. Heat up the set in the tip and hold it in the opposite direction from the set. Let it cool as you continue to hold it.

    That's what a pro will do. It's not rocket science.

  7. #17

    Default Re: Old Wright & McGill Rod

    The steam method is certainly less drastic than a dryer or toaster and the method I use..... with a really bad set....it might be a good idea to do in steps and not try to fix the entire set in one try.... I did this on a relly bent tip that I was asked to try to straighten and it worked well..and the set didn't come back. I would suggest this if you try it yourself...especially if the set has been this way for a really long time.

    Old Man - I agree it is not rocket science especially to someone who has been around Bamboo for a long time, but it is foreign to those unfamiliar with Bamboo and they can (and usually do) use too much heat or try to bend the tip to far. Not knowing how good the varnish is on this rod...I would be reluctant to advise on doing it yourself....again - just my opinion.

  8. #18

    Default Re: Old Wright & McGill Rod

    Quote Originally Posted by wtex50 View Post
    The steam method is certainly less drastic than a dryer or toaster and the method I use..... with a really bad set....it might be a good idea to do in steps and not try to fix the entire set in one try.... I did this on a relly bent tip that I was asked to try to straighten and it worked well..and the set didn't come back. I would suggest this if you try it yourself...especially if the set has been this way for a really long time.

    Old Man - I agree it is not rocket science especially to someone who has been around Bamboo for a long time, but it is foreign to those unfamiliar with Bamboo and they can (and usually do) use too much heat or try to bend the tip to far. Not knowing how good the varnish is on this rod...I would be reluctant to advise on doing it yourself....again - just my opinion.
    You're probably right. I think if someone is careful and goes slow it works ok. Trying to take out the whole set is risky and I should have mentioned it. Thanks for picking up on it.

  9. #19

    Default Re: Old Wright & McGill Rod

    OldMan - Slow and in steps is always the best way with a severe set... Unfortunately I learned that lesson the hard way...by snapping a tip...many years ago... I got a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach when that sucker snapped. Thank goodness it was not an expensive rod.

    U still fishing Grangers? I love them, but my favorite old rod is a 6wt Phillipson

    Those Denver rod builders were great.

  10. #20

    Default Re: Old Wright & McGill Rod

    Quote Originally Posted by wtex50 View Post
    OldMan - Slow and in steps is always the best way with a severe set... Unfortunately I learned that lesson the hard way...by snapping a tip...many years ago... I got a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach when that sucker snapped. Thank goodness it was not an expensive rod.

    U still fishing Grangers? I love them, but my favorite old rod is a 6wt Phillipson

    Those Denver rod builders were great.
    I love the Grangers, but I have my eye on a Heddon. I hear good things about their tapers, and I want to try one.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-06-2008, 04:47 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-02-2008, 05:03 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-01-2008, 10:00 AM
  4. Have you made any of your tieing tools?
    By Colorado Cajun in forum Flies
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-02-2007, 07:16 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •