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  1. #1

    Default Wading boot alternatives for bikepacking

    Next summer I'm planning to ride my bike across Spain with my fly rod. I've never toured fully loaded and I'm increasingly apprehensive about packing. I will likely have lightweight waders and would love to figure out a substitute for big ol' wading boots like my daily drivers, Simms Freestones. Neoprene booties with tread or something along that line to protect the stocking feet and give me adequate but certainly not great grip, any thoughts for something lightweight and packable?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Wading boot alternatives for bikepacking

    Hollisd

    That sure sounds like an awesome trip you have planned, I sure hope you take a lot of photos and post up a trip report, or better yet a running report every few days so we can follow your progress.

    I know-nothing about the fishing in Spain, but here in the summer months of Wyoming I like to do a lot of wet wading. I will put on a pair of Simms neoprene wading socks and a pair of light weight running shoes or something like the Simms Riprap wading shoe, that comes in either a rubber sole or felt sole.
    Riprap Shoe | Wet Wading Shoes | Simms Fishing
    Larry


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  4. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Wading boot alternatives for bikepacking

    I wet wade about 80% of my time here in California. I also hike quite a bit to get to spots, and lugging around the heavier wading boots would be not too fun. There's also a few times I'll jump on a bike and pedal to spots that have bike access to them.

    I've found that a 'canyoneering' boot fits perfectly for my situation. They function well off and on the water, are extremely comfortable, and the particular model that I use (Five Ten Canyoneering) has the stickiest sole I've ever encountered. At first I thought that it being so sticky would make it soft, thus susceptible to getting worn down a lot especially when a lot of miles have been put on, and I think my Vibram soles on my Simms boots (that get a lot less mileage put on them) worn down quicker.

    Take a look if you can find a deal on them, since when Adidas bought out Five Ten, they removed this particular model from their line.

    Field Tested: Five-Ten Canyoneer | Canoe & Kayak Magazine

    I use Simms neoprene booties when wet wading, and the shoe is true to size. If you're using a bit bulkier neoprene that comes with the waders, you may have to go a size up.

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  6. #4

    Default Re: Wading boot alternatives for bikepacking

    @Larry I like the Simms Riprap a lot. I wasn't even thinking along those lines so appreciate it.

    Darkshadow thanks for your suggestion too. What these have me thinking is I need to find something ideally quick drying that I can pedal and fish in and then have an extra flip flop or sandal type shoe for town & camp. That way I'm only carrying one lightweight shoe like before. Previously I rode with cycling shoes that clip into my pedals but I think I will forgo those on this trip since the ride will be more leisurely fully loaded.

    I may be able to get away with not using waders in Spain in high summer but for early morning or a night sesh tossing a mouse along the banks it would be nice to have packable waders just typing out loud. But you're probably right that I can get away with wet wading. I'll have to think about it.

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  8. #5
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Wading boot alternatives for bikepacking

    I use a chaco sandal. You can hike in them and wet wade in them. Something I have on my wish list is Chota hippies. smaller and lighter than waders for hiking.
    flyfishingnwmontana.blogspot.com

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  10. #6

    Default Re: Wading boot alternatives for bikepacking

    This may be stupid, but what about Korkers. Use your wading boots to hike with, just carry different soles.

  11. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Wading boot alternatives for bikepacking

    I hike a lot in my korkers for short distances, 2 to 3 miles. But Korkers have three big issues when hiking distance. Weight when wet, even with rubber soles. Second, korkers, like most wading boots are not designed for long distance hiking. i have an old pair of SuperFeet i have inserted in them to help that, but that only works for so long. Finally, I wear a pair of neoprene socks inside the korkers to help fill them out and keep my feet warm. Once you start sweating you will get hot spots...and then blisters. Trust me I love korkers for anything under 3 or 4 miles. But be careful of your feet.
    flyfishingnwmontana.blogspot.com

  12. #8
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    Default Re: Wading boot alternatives for bikepacking

    Spain is a lovely country and very warm in the summer, if it was me I’d not be taking waders.
    Wet wading is the way to go .
    English by Birth A Geordie by the grace of God!

  13. #9

    Default Re: Wading boot alternatives for bikepacking

    Quote Originally Posted by geordie41 View Post
    Spain is a lovely country and very warm in the summer, if it was me I’d not be taking waders.
    Wet wading is the way to go .
    I know but I was thinking about night and mornings how nice it would be to have the option.

    You're right though I can probably make the cut and get away with something like the Simms Riprap although I might try to get double mileage from a shoe to ride and wade in although it'll never dry.

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  15. #10

    Default Re: Wading boot alternatives for bikepacking

    There are neoprene booties with felt soles, like saltwater flats booties. Very lightweight and good grip, the real issue is banging your ankles on rocks because they don't offer protection like a wading boot. I've biked and backpacked with my Patagonia ultralight wading boots, they're much lighter than your Simms boots, but still weigh a couple pounds.
    If all else fails buy a bike trailer and bring all your extra gear.

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