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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
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    Default Re: It's Time for a Fun Thread!

    I bought this in 1982 and yes that's before the movie Crocodile Dundee was made



    From digging latrines to splitting kindling for fires I've been carrying that all these years. I also keep a machete in the boat but they aren't as old and tested as the knife. You can bet that the knife was in the tent in my first post on this thread. It's a Western brand.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Eastern Iowa
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    Default Re: It's Time for a Fun Thread!

    You ever try walking around the boat thrusting that knife in the air while making pirate sounds? I think it might work for that.

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  5. #33

    Default Re: It's Time for a Fun Thread!

    Quote Originally Posted by ia_trouter View Post
    Those are very cool Bob. I am thinking I have probably never seen a Coleman lantern older than the 1960's. I assume the knob on your lantern is updated? If so, is it otherwise vintage? How do they work compared to a newer lantern?
    It is completely original. The globe is made of sheets of mica, not glass. I'm not sure of the correct name of the material the knob is made of. It kind of looks like treated, compressed, and laminated paper.

    That old lantern works the same way as the new ones; by vaporizing Coleman fuel (or kerosene in some models) and burning it inside chemically-treated silk mantels. The very old ones have a more primitive, looped generator that has to be preheated with a couple of matches before you can get the lantern to light. Some, like my model LZ327, also lack a built-in pump to pressurize the fuel tank (fount). The fount's fill cap has a small dimple with a check valve under it and you press the end of a brass hand pump against it and pump up the tank pressure that way.

    Here is a long and detailed explanation of exactly how the Coleman lantern works: How a Coleman? Lantern and Stove Works: Old Town Coleman

    Tight lines,
    Bob
    At the southern tip of Lake Champlain

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  7. #34
    Join Date
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    Default Re: It's Time for a Fun Thread!

    After that explanation I had to go back to page 3 for another look. Mica Schist or just schist was plentiful in the mountains of North Georgia when I lived there. I should have collected and kept some of the larger specimens. There were areas where it littered the ground and of course I had to peal some.

    I had no idea those were made from it, I did know that it was the first material used for translucent windows or at least I think it was.......... That handle material may be that same stuff that was the early replacement for metal Nickle / Silver used on reel seats, I forget the name of it but had some really early South Bend bamboo rods that used a plastic like material but it was the forerunner of plastic.

    Anyway, really cool Bob thanks for the education on antique Coleman's

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

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  9. #35
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    Sep 2013
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    Eastern Iowa
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    Default Re: It's Time for a Fun Thread!

    Thanks for posting that Bob. I had always thought they must use some of the same principles as an automotive carburetor. I've always been a little mystified by how much light can come off the small mantel(s). Obviously burning fuel emits light, and adding additional oxygen to the mix makes a hotter whiter flame. But still, it seems incredibly efficient for it's time.

  10. #36

    Default Re: It's Time for a Fun Thread!

    Quote Originally Posted by ia_trouter View Post
    Thanks for posting that Bob. I had always thought they must use some of the same principles as an automotive carburetor. I've always been a little mystified by how much light can come off the small mantel(s). Obviously burning fuel emits light, and adding additional oxygen to the mix makes a hotter whiter flame. But still, it seems incredibly efficient for it's time.
    It's not the flame that's making the light... it's the incandescence of the mantles. The woven silk mantles are dipped in chemicals like thorium oxide and other oxides (thorium oxide is radioactive so they now use yttrium oxide). When you initially burn the mantles, the silk burns away leaving a fragile ceramic shell formed from this coating. When heated to high temperatures, it gives off a tremendous amount of light (just like a incandescent lightbulb's tungsten filament does when heated with an electrical current).

    The whole pressurized gas lantern technology is pretty interesting and knowing a little bit about it makes the lanterns even more fun to use. Most of us probably have seen or used a Coleman lantern in our lifetime. I still use them whenever I get the chance. The lanterns from the previous century still work as well as the latest models!

    A selection from 1938 on the left to 1961 on the right:
    lanterns.jpg
    The two big nickel-plated ones of the right trio are made the same month and year I was made. They are the same model, one burning kerosene and one burning Coleman fuel. The kerosene-burning lanterns need to have their generator pre-heated in order to function with kerosene's high flash point. The little plastic squeeze bottle you can see on the shelf is for filling a small reservoir around the base of the lantern's generator with alcohol. This is lit and burned off before the lantern can be lit.

    Each lantern has the month and year of manufacture stamped somewhere on the fount; usually on the bottom. That makes it easy to search for and find a lantern that is the same age you are, or give a gift of a "birthday" lantern.

    Tight lines,
    Bob
    Last edited by desmobob; 02-10-2019 at 09:49 AM.
    At the southern tip of Lake Champlain

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  12. #37

    Default Re: It's Time for a Fun Thread!

    Classic Optimus 8R camp stove.

    Optimus 8R.jpg

    I also use a trusty Svea 123. Oldies but goodies!

    Tight lines,
    Bob
    At the southern tip of Lake Champlain

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  14. #38

    Default Re: It's Time for a Fun Thread!

    Here is my moss Little Dipper on the Keezhik River, N. Ontario. SRCB6F11C3-76AB-4902-9097-81F70E474EAD.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  16. #39

    Default Re: It's Time for a Fun Thread!

    Here is an Optimus 111 hiker, which is a bit larger than the hunter model. 74EA961E-4B3D-4677-B73A-9CF5B924270C.jpg

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  18. #40
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Default Re: It's Time for a Fun Thread!

    My old Coleman two burner stove is still going strong. I think I bought it in the late 70's and it has moved with me through relocations in 5 states over the years. It had originally used white gas for fuel, but I converted it to propane a few years ago. I'm hoping it sees many campgrounds this year!!!

    MIKE ADAIR - Exploring New Mexico landscapes through fly fishing, golf, and art.
    @mka133

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