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  1. #1

    Default Line/nymph "alignment" behind strike indicator

    Hey everyone,

    I mostly fish nymphs at this stage in my fly fishing career and really have been strictly concentrating on casting in general. I was out this past weekend and while I was working on my casting I was noticing some things about my line that got me thinking.

    I was casting up stream at probably about a 45. What I was noticing sometimes was that my nymph wouldn't be directly behind my indicator but sometimes it was almost at a 90 degree angle from the strike indicator. It was tough to tell if the line would then move behind the indicator or not.

    It got me thinking whether this is was right/wrong/or just the nature of the beast. To my understanding the nymph should always be following directly behind the strike indicator but I'm having a hard time imagining how I could accomplish that. Is it something casting wise I'm doing something wrong or does the nymph typically just end up following behind the indicator once it's been floating for a bit?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Line/nymph "alignment" behind strike indicator

    the position of the nymphs relative to the indicator will be dictated more by their weight and the speed/depth of the water, than by how you're casting. google the tuck cast to get your flies down faster.

    this might help too Ask George Daniel | Nymphing Angles | Troutbitten
    tons of great nymphing info on Dom's blog.
    "There's only one thing wrong with a fishing day--its staggering brevity. Zane Grey

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  4. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Line/nymph "alignment" behind strike indicator

    Thess videos with Kelly Galloup are terrific.



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  6. #4

    Default Re: Line/nymph "alignment" behind strike indicator

    Quote Originally Posted by LimerickShaw View Post
    Hey everyone,

    I mostly fish nymphs at this stage in my fly fishing career and really have been strictly concentrating on casting in general. I was out this past weekend and while I was working on my casting I was noticing some things about my line that got me thinking.

    I was casting up stream at probably about a 45. What I was noticing sometimes was that my nymph wouldn't be directly behind my indicator but sometimes it was almost at a 90 degree angle from the strike indicator. It was tough to tell if the line would then move behind the indicator or not.

    It got me thinking whether this is was right/wrong/or just the nature of the beast. To my understanding the nymph should always be following directly behind the strike indicator but I'm having a hard time imagining how I could accomplish that. Is it something casting wise I'm doing something wrong or does the nymph typically just end up following behind the indicator once it's been floating for a bit?
    You casted across several different currents and the indicator landed in one seam and the nymphs landed in another.

    Normally, if the indicator lands in the same current seam as the weighted nymphs, the nymphs will drift slower than the indicator because of the difference in the velocity between the surface (faster) and the bottom (slower). The indicator will then "drag" or "lead" the nymphs down stream.

    In your case, the indicator land the nymphs landed in different current seams. So the the flies and the indicator were offset from one another in that the nymphs were landed closer to the far bank and the indicator landed closer to you (you were casting 45 degrees upstream). Whether the current seam of the indicator is slower or faster than the flies does not matter.

    When fishing floating flies, we are dealing with a 2 dimensional space. When nymphing we are dealing with a 3 dimensional space. On the surface we can tell when 2 flies are offset in different current seams. When nymphing, you have to be able to imagine the offset of the indicator from the nymphs and cast so there is no horizontal offset from one seam to another.

    Eventually with a long enough drift, the indicator and flies will "line up" BUT when they are in the process of lining up, the flies will be "dragged" toward the indicator and simultaneously the indicator is "dragged" toward the flies. So the flies will be drifting unnaturally across the current seams. They are less likely to be taken.

    So rather than casting at 45 degrees ACROSS the river, fish more upstream and any across stream casts should be compensated for with a reach mend that places the indicator and flies in the same seam. If the indicator and flies still land in different seams, then an immediate mend the LIFTS the indicator off of its seam and repositions it on the seam of the flies is the way to get the best drift.

    As for the tuck cast, it will also be more effective when the across stream casting angle is less. A tuck cast drives the nymphs down into the water, and it will decrease the offset because the nymphs will land closer to the indicator but it does nothing to cure a seam offset if the nymphs and indicator still land in different seams.

    Drop shotting will NOT not cure seam offsets either. It places the spit shot on the bottom but the rig will still be dragged sideways to the flow until the indicator and the rig are in the same seam. Try to cast all indicator rigs into the same current seam.
    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

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  8. #5
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    Default Re: Line/nymph "alignment" behind strike indicator

    I may not be understanding exactly what your issue is, but . . .

    If you mean that your cast frequently throws your leader off to the side, then I'm wit' you, as Joe Pesci would say.

    The only way I know of to cure this problem is to roll cast. Any kind of overhead cast with an indicator, a split shot(s), and multiple flies won't lay out consistently in a straight line, IME.

    But roll casts usually lay out straight. The problem is that roll casts aren't slack line casts, so you usually have to throw both some slack line and a mend immediately after touchdown.
    "Three-fourths of the Earth's surface is water, and one-fourth is land. It is quite clear that the good Lord intended us to spend triple the amount of time fishing as taking care of the lawn." ~Chuck Clark

  9. #6
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    Default Re: Line/nymph "alignment" behind strike indicator

    The ability to "mend" what makes fly rod fishing superior to "so called" conventional fishing.
    Just sayin'
    The simpler the outfit, the more skill it takes to manage it, and the more pleasure one gets in his achievements. --- Horace Kephart

  10. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Line/nymph "alignment" behind strike indicator

    This discussion is also demonstrating why Short line ( Czech ) nymphing was so effective compared to traditional nymphing methods . The indicators were always in line with the ( tight ) line .

    G S

  11. #8

    Default Re: Line/nymph "alignment" behind strike indicator

    Quote Originally Posted by rangerrich99 View Post
    I may not be understanding exactly what your issue is, but . . .

    If you mean that your cast frequently throws your leader off to the side, then I'm wit' you, as Joe Pesci would say.

    The only way I know of to cure this problem is to roll cast. Any kind of overhead cast with an indicator, a split shot(s), and multiple flies won't lay out consistently in a straight line, IME.

    But roll casts usually lay out straight. The problem is that roll casts aren't slack line casts, so you usually have to throw both some slack line and a mend immediately after touchdown.
    rolls casts are also the best way to ensure that you get a nice big tangle on the first cast!
    "There's only one thing wrong with a fishing day--its staggering brevity. Zane Grey

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