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Thread: Slip and Slide

  1. #1

    Default Slip and Slide

    Over the weekend my wife and I fished a section of river we had been on many times before. The only difference was we were wearing brand new rubber soled wading boots as opposed to our stand felt soled boots. My wife commented right away "these boots are more slippery than our old ones". I should have put studs in our boots but I was lazy and wanted to believe the marketing hype that said these new rubber soles would provide good traction. I paid for this late in the day with a cold dunking in the river and a battered right shin. No doubt part of the blame rests on me for not paying better attention to what I was doing.

    Bottom line for me is that on the rivers I fish rubber soles don't compare to felt. I realize that the studs would have been a aid but for me nothing grips like felt soles. So when my wife and I go to fish Yellowstone this September we'll make sure we have studs in our rubber soled wading boots.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Slip and Slide

    After slipping and sliding across PA streams the first time I went steelhead fishing there, I put studs in mine and never looked back.

    Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk

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  5. #3

    Default Re: Slip and Slide

    Aluminum bars are a good alternative if you are trying to get away from felt for invasive species control. They are a little heavier, but get the job done. As far as I can tell the rubber is only good for the trails and banks.

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  7. #4
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Slip and Slide

    I want all the traction I can get, so I use studded felt boots.

    I consider the rubber soles that are supplied with some boots to be so bad that they're dangerous.
    Today is the first day of the rest of your life.

    Paul

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  9. #5

    Default Re: Slip and Slide

    I believe felt has been unfairly linked to the transport of invasives, primarily rock snot, but that aside, I did a thorough test. Felt is far better than the most advanced (Vibram) rubber for griping. Studded felt is only slightly better than studded rubber. Carbide studs are much better than the screw in types and the aluminum bars on rubber, though heavier are the grippiest. Test method: put a different boot on each foot and wade across the river without camera or rod.

    When some folks went ballisticly anti-felt due to the false Whirling Disease scare, I wrote, "We have a choice make believe dead rainbows decaying in the river or real life drowned angler corpses rotting in the river".

  10. #6
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    Default Re: Slip and Slide

    Quote Originally Posted by sweetandsalt View Post
    I believe felt has been unfairly linked to the transport of invasives, primarily rock snot...
    Vermont banned felt-soled boots in 2011 and rescinded the ban in 2016 because "...recent research has revealed that it [didymo] is actually native to Vermont and other regions of North America. Scientists found that didymo spores are present in most Vermont rivers, and the spores can cause nuisance algae blooms under certain water conditions favoring growth of the algae."
    Today is the first day of the rest of your life.

    Paul

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  12. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Slip and Slide

    Aluminum bars are the only way to go. Much more gripping area than studs.

    Korkers boots have the aluminum bar soles that have worked for the past three years. My fishing buddy who has a new pair of Sims rubber soled boots with carbide studs, just took a swim off the same rocks I was standing on. He said the rock was much too slippery for him. The aluminum bars were solid on the same rocks.

    Bob

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  14. #8

    Default Re: Slip and Slide

    Quote Originally Posted by plecain View Post
    Vermont banned felt-soled boots in 2011 and rescinded the ban in 2016 because "...recent research has revealed that it [didymo] is actually native to Vermont and other regions of North America. Scientists found that didymo spores are present in most Vermont rivers, and the spores can cause nuisance algae blooms under certain water conditions favoring growth of the algae."
    This happened a lot. Felt is absorbent and stays wet? And shoe laces and fabric uppers on rubber soled boots, neoprene gravel cuffs, channels in drift boat trailers immersed in one river after another... Human mismanagement of dams and diversions effecting flow levels and water temperatures are what causes habitat damage in rivers and let not begin to get into the acidifying, desalinating, polluted oceans.

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  16. #9

    Default Re: Slip and Slide

    Take a look at Rock Treads. They are relatively new, so they aren't as well known as other materials. But my experience with them for two years makes them the top choice for me - by far. They are aluminum discs that you attach to your boot in the pattern that is best for you. And, they grip well, since the rock bites into the aluminum.

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  18. #10
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    Default Re: Slip and Slide

    I remember the good old days when Orvis sold the new Vibram soled boots (forget the model name) with studs included / built into the sole. They coulld be a bit too studley at times but you were not confronted with the need to purchase the studs after the fact.

    That said I use the Alumbite star cleat that fits the Simms boots and have not been dunked in a river. Matter of fact, I have not taken an actual mid-stream dunking since 1977. Chalk that up to the many near death experiences I had prior to that time and being fairly sure of foot. I (at this age) carry a wading staff, a collapsible type and I employ the staff whenever I do crossings where a studied eye can determine risk of drowning. You can fall and drown anywhere but I strive to be alone in Alaska which puts me far from anyone who will even find my body...

    The combination of cleats - careful wading and the use of a balance aid (staff) will (in my experience) drastically reduce the risk of falling into a creek or river.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

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