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  1. Question To Spey or not to Spey ???

    I have been fly fishing for at least 40+ years & I've always used the "standard" type of fly rod. You know my 9' 4wt Sage FLi for trout, a
    T/T 10' 7wt steelhead rod, etc. Lately, I have been reading/researching
    about spey rods.

    * How tough are they to learn ? Is it a one day learning event, especially for those with years of fly fishing experience ?
    * If you've bought one, do you use it more or less than the "standard" ?
    * Have you found the equipment basically the same price ranges as "standard" ?
    * Is it a necessary thing to use one specifically on just huge rivers ?
    * What's the best length to buy for a good steelhead/salmon outfit ?
    * Does the longer rod make fighting BIG fish easier ?

    Looking for a few thoughts from any of you,
    Tie One On

  2. #2

    Default Re: To Spey or not to Spey ???

    I have different experience with spey rods. I been fly fishing for two years, within my first four months of fly fishing I attended a free spey cast lesson. I pick up things pretty easily and am pretty good at showing others how it is done. I learned to fly cast and perfected it in two months. Spey casting for me was easy. I am not a trout fisherman and will most likely never use it for salmon fishing within the next 10-15 years but it was easy for me. It is quite fun, but you can only do it while your on the water. My cast instruction was on a local river that was maybe only 100 feet across. I say find someone who will show you the cast for free, then go out and buy a spey rod if you like it.

    I am sure that did not help and since I am not a trout fishermen you will most likely ignore it all together.

  3. #3

    Default Re: To Spey or not to Spey ???

    I say spey, but........

    I advise taking a 2 day (weekend) clinic with a reputable instructor and drawing your own conclusions... before you buy gear. If you do it through a good shop they should offer a nice selection of gear to use and try out so you can see what fits your groove. For me it was the Z-Axis, which some folks (who I don't believe knew their arse from a...) told me would 'be too fast for a beginner'. It's not that fast, and I had been screwing around with a lot of 'unconventional' roll casting forms for 10 years so....... seriously, go find out for yourself because none of us are you (read as: don't have a clue ).

    Worst case: you'll be a heck of a lot better roll caster and have some different perspective on line management that will serve well with one hander's too. You might even meet some cool folks to share water with down the road... I got to be friends with my instructor Jim Rusher, and have since hooked up to 'just go fish'.
    ... But a lifelong journey.

    I choose fly rods the same way I do women, motorcycles, and cowboy boots...
    go with what ever feels good, and keep on hand as many as I can afford

  4. Default Re: To Spey or not to Spey ???

    Quote Originally Posted by tie one on View Post
    I have been fly fishing for at least 40+ years & I've always used the "standard" type of fly rod. You know my 9' 4wt Sage FLi for trout, a
    T/T 10' 7wt steelhead rod, etc. Lately, I have been reading/researching
    about spey rods.

    1* How tough are they to learn ? Is it a one day learning event, especially for those with years of fly fishing experience ?
    2* If you've bought one, do you use it more or less than the "standard" ?
    3* Have you found the equipment basically the same price ranges as "standard" ?
    4* Is it a necessary thing to use one specifically on just huge rivers ?
    5* What's the best length to buy for a good steelhead/salmon outfit ?
    6* Does the longer rod make fighting BIG fish easier ?

    Looking for a few thoughts from any of you,
    Tie One On
    1) They take some practice. You do not even need a spey rod to learn how to spey fish, I know how to spey and use spey casts on one handed rods all the time. You say you are a long time fly fisheman? That helps us about as much as saying you are a long time golfer: you might have played golf for 40 years and have a handicap of 2 or 30!! Big difference. If you have been fly fishing a long time I assume you can roll can 40 feet over both shoulders? If so you should be able to learn spey casting fairly fast. You will need to practice since you will have to use different power getting the fly from the dangle to the anchor point at 40 feet or 80 feet.
    2) If I am making casts over 40 feet yes. Under that you can just use a single handed rod to do the spey casts (and have your fly in the water more time and thus have better chances to catch fish
    3) Spey is absolutely more expensive, from the rods, to the reels, to the lines, to spey flies.
    4) like I already mentioned you can use spey casts on a small creek to quickly get your fly from the dangle to where you want it with a one handed rod. For a river 40 -60 feet wide you might want to consider a switch rod or a 12.6 foot rod, and go up from there.
    5) a good length? You havent even told us what rivers you are going to fish and how big they are?? You are from the grea lakes area, so assuming you are fishing small rivers a 7 through 9 weight switch or 12.6 would be good.

    6) I find it to be a disadvantage. I was fishing a 6/7 weight spey rod and have a fresh chromer on, 28 inches, and I felt overgunned. Was too easy and not as much fun. Once you get the fish in close it is the opposite, you have to either
    1) have someone net the fish for you
    2) beach it (not good for the fish)
    3) dip your rod back,grab your fly line, and tug the fish in. With a 30 -40 pound king salmon this can be a unpleasant experience if it tries to make a last minute dash.

  5. Default Re: To Spey or not to Spey ???

    Quote Originally Posted by GRN View Post
    I say spey, but........

    I advise taking a 2 day (weekend) clinic with a reputable instructor and drawing your own conclusions... before you buy gear. If you do it through a good shop they should offer a nice selection of gear to use and try out so you can see what fits your groove. For me it was the Z-Axis, which some folks (who I don't believe knew their arse from a...) told me would 'be too fast for a beginner'. It's not that fast, and I had been screwing around with a lot of 'unconventional' roll casting forms for 10 years so....... seriously, go find out for yourself because none of us are you (read as: don't have a clue ).
    .
    This is excellent advice. If you can find a spey gathering definitely attend. You can practice cast different spey rods and even get free lessons from reps. Learning the proper technique is definitely very important.

    With TFO's Deer Creek switch and spey and Echo's Dec Hogan switch and spey, now is the best time to get a GREAT spey rod at a good price. Personally I liked the deer creek better than the z axis, the only rod that cast better than a DC (or meiser custom rod, based on CTS blanks) was CND.

    I am not a Sage basher, I think the z axis and zxl are unmatched in one handed rods, but for 2 handed rods....But definitely try it out. I just think you will find the Echo Dec Hogan or Deer Creek better at half the cost.


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