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  1. #1

    Default Rod|Reel paring and beginner friendly setup

    Hello all,

    Just joined, ready to try my hand at Fly Fishing. Hope this post is in the right place.

    A little background. Been fishing, when life permits, for many years, mostly Bass and Trout with spinning and Baitcasting tackle and techniques. Also, many trips to the local lakes, ponds and streams when I was a kid with Dad. He was really into Fly Fishing, always talked about teaching me, but time ran out on us. He came up to live with us after my mom passed, but his health was poor and he really didn’t get a chance to fish much at all in the last 10-15 years. He passed away last July.

    As I started getting all my fishing gear ready for the season, I started going through all his Fly Fishing gear. Been reading a bunch and watching lots of YouTube, but I always go to the forums, usually where the best knowledge is, so here I am!

    I think I understand what pairs with what, listed below is what I was thinking. I have cleaned all his reels and lines, but this stuff probably hasn’t seen the water since the 90s. I eventually want to get them all going, but never would have imagined Fly Line was so expensive! I want to concentrate on 1 or 2 setups for now, maybe buy the best line possible and set myself up to learn with the best possible set of circumstances.

    My Initial purpose
    • Learn on the most beginner friendly setup
    • Set it up as best as possible
    • Fish the local Mill and Saugatuck rivers in southern CT
    • Maybe fish the Saugatuck Reservoir too
    • Trout to start, dry flies mostly.

    So, my questions:

    • What would be the best setup to learn on, and what would you recommend for a good quality line?
    • Is the way I have the rods and reels paired correct, would you change anything?
    • Any clues as to that combo would be good for XX and that one for XX would help too.

    Reel: Browning Arms Model 1230 (w/extra spool) Rod: Scott 505 754 7'6"
    Reel: Orvis Battenkill 5/6 WF 5/6 (w/extra spool) Rod: Orvis Rocky Mountain 2 3/8 oz 5wt. 7'
    Reel: 6806 Abel #5 Rod: Sage sp 589-5 Graphite Durascrim 4 2 3/16 oz #5 line 8'9"
    Reel: Pflueger Medalist 1494 1/2 (w/extra spool) Rod: St Croix 4302 6/7 line 8'6"
    Reel: Reddington AL 9/10 Rod: St Croix Legend Series L9010 9/10 line 9'

    Thanks to all, much appreciated


    Larry

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,323

    Default Re: Rod|Reel paring and beginner friendly setup

    Consider visiting a local fly shop. They should have all the info you need along with what you need.
    Mainline the blueline

  3. #3

    Default Re: Rod|Reel paring and beginner friendly setup

    If you are going to be buying line, you might want to look at discount sites like Sierra, or the bargain bin at Cabela's, Bean, etc. It seems that what was the state of the art two years ago is now pushed aside, though still excellent. I bought three or four different weights of SA Sharkwave for about $35 at LL Bean. Titan Sonar too. I bought SA Mastery GPX at Sierra for $29. The fish don't seem to care that I don't have the latest model.

    It reminds me of running shoe marketing. A friend of mine, when he finds a pair of running shoes he likes, buys a half-dozen pairs because in a year or two they will change the model (they need new products to get in the review articles in the various magazines) and the new one is never as good (at least for his feet).

    It also reminds me of a story by Toshio Odate, the late great Japanese woodworker. He told a story about his training in the apprentice system in Japan. The students lived in the workshop area, and did odd jobs for the teachers for spending money (sharpening tools, cleaning, that sort of thing). One day on a trip into town he saw a beautiful hand plane in a store window, and he made himself a vow that he would own it. So he scrimped and saved and sacrificed until he had the money and he bought the tool. All the way back to the school on the train, he looked at it and caressed it. But the first day he took it out to use it, his teacher demanded "Where did you get that?" Odate explained, and the teacher confiscated it, "You are not yet worthy of a tool like that." I think about that story whenever I lust after new fishing gear, a new guitar, new hand tools, etc.

    PS - Odate didn't say whether or not he ever got the plane back.

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  5. #4

    Default Re: Rod|Reel paring and beginner friendly setup

    One local shop, the guy was a personal friend of my dad, but he is more gun related and closed to foot traffic. Just found another one a few towns over that is also closed to foot traffic during the virus. I've watched a bunch of videos from Mad river Outfitters, planned on giving them my business. Maybe I will call them, but I thought I'd ask here first.

  6. #5

    Default Re: Rod|Reel paring and beginner friendly setup

    Thanks for the info and the story. Also into guitars and I often tell myself that I'll never get all it offers or outgrow it. I might be a bit swayed by the marketing, since new to me. I also think that the line on these reels is circa 1990s and the technology should have come a ways since then. I was considering the SA Mastery Trout smooth, saw the Sharkwave discounted on some sites, but never heard of it. Heard good things about the GPX too, I guess replaced by the MPX line...

  7. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,323

    Default Re: Rod|Reel paring and beginner friendly setup

    Quote Originally Posted by Espo66 View Post
    Thanks for the info and the story. Also into guitars and I often tell myself that I'll never get all it offers or outgrow it. I might be a bit swayed by the marketing, since new to me. I also think that the line on these reels is circa 1990s and the technology should have come a ways since then. I was considering the SA Mastery Trout smooth, saw the Sharkwave discounted on some sites, but never heard of it. Heard good things about the GPX too, I guess replaced by the MPX line...
    Reels have come some way, most notably in the larger sizes with drags. The reels for lighter weight lines say less than 5-6 weight really do nothing more than hold the line so less changes there. A good click pawl reel for 5 weight or less is usually more than adequate, most of the time but certainly not all.

    As for fly shops in CT, I did a quick simple Google search and was amazed at how many are there. Here in east TN we are not as blessed. Using the local fly shop helps to keep them in business (present time excepted) and also be there for the most important customer service and knowledge.

    This site will have more specific info on the waters you intend to fish from what I can tell.


    Your Waters - Trout, Steelhead, Saltwater Species & Salmon Fishing Destinations
    Mainline the blueline

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  9. #7

    Default Re: Rod|Reel paring and beginner friendly setup

    Quote Originally Posted by Espo66 View Post
    Hello all,

    Just joined, ready to try my hand at Fly Fishing. Hope this post is in the right place.

    A little background. Been fishing, when life permits, for many years, mostly Bass and Trout with spinning and Baitcasting tackle and techniques. Also, many trips to the local lakes, ponds and streams when I was a kid with Dad. He was really into Fly Fishing, always talked about teaching me, but time ran out on us. He came up to live with us after my mom passed, but his health was poor and he really didn’t get a chance to fish much at all in the last 10-15 years. He passed away last July.

    As I started getting all my fishing gear ready for the season, I started going through all his Fly Fishing gear. Been reading a bunch and watching lots of YouTube, but I always go to the forums, usually where the best knowledge is, so here I am!

    I think I understand what pairs with what, listed below is what I was thinking. I have cleaned all his reels and lines, but this stuff probably hasn’t seen the water since the 90s. I eventually want to get them all going, but never would have imagined Fly Line was so expensive! I want to concentrate on 1 or 2 setups for now, maybe buy the best line possible and set myself up to learn with the best possible set of circumstances.

    My Initial purpose
    • Learn on the most beginner friendly setup
    • Set it up as best as possible
    • Fish the local Mill and Saugatuck rivers in southern CT
    • Maybe fish the Saugatuck Reservoir too
    Trout to start, dry flies mostly.

    So, my questions:

    • What would be the best setup to learn on, and what would you recommend for a good quality line?
    • Is the way I have the rods and reels paired correct, would you change anything?
    • Any clues as to that combo would be good for XX and that one for XX would help too.

    Reel: Browning Arms Model 1230 (w/extra spool) Rod: Scott 505 754 7'6"
    Reel: Orvis Battenkill 5/6 WF 5/6 (w/extra spool) Rod: Orvis Rocky Mountain 2 3/8 oz 5wt. 7'
    Reel: 6806 Abel #5 Rod: Sage sp 589-5 Graphite Durascrim 4 2 3/16 oz #5 line 8'9"
    Reel: Pflueger Medalist 1494 1/2 (w/extra spool) Rod: St Croix 4302 6/7 line 8'6"
    Reel: Reddington AL 9/10 Rod: St Croix Legend Series L9010 9/10 line 9'

    Thanks to all, much appreciated


    Larry
    First of all, you have listed rods from 4 wt to 10 wt and lengths from 7' 6" to 9 feet in lengths. You need to scale it down to ONE main rod to start and that will be the rod you will use to learn how to fly cast! So choose either a trout or bass outfit. In my opinion, it will be easier to learn to cast a trout rod.

    The prototypical trout rod is a 9 ft 5 wt and you have NO 9 ft 5 wt rod listed. If you are mostly fishing lakes and larger streams and rivers, a 9 footer will be best. If you fish tight streams, go to a 8' 6" or even an 8' rod

    For 5 wt lines and above, get a WF Floating line. For 4 wt rods and rods and below, you can go with a DT lines.

    After you master the 5 wt rod, you can go up to a 6 or 7 wt rod for bass depending on how large the flies you will casting and the size of the bass you will be targeting. Again, I suggest a 9 footer.

    Start with a medium or medium fast action for your first trout rod. A medium action will be better for dry flies. A medium fast will be a better all arounder since a bit faster rod reacts faster for nymphing. For dries and nymphs in rivers, a floating line is all that is needed. I generally recommend a medium fast action since it is a better all around action which will allow you to also cast streamers a bit better than a medium action rod.

    For reservoirs, an intermediate fly line is the most versatile line. It will float when treated with folatant and sink if untreated. However, you can use the floating line to start.

    Here's the deal with fly line. You are a beginner. If you will ALWAYS practice your casting on water, you can buy a good quality fly line to start. However, almost all beginners practice on grass and grass damages fly line. So if you are going to practice casting on grass, I would start with a medium quality line. Buy one on sale on a site like Sierra Trading post one it reopens after the CV-19 closure.
    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

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  11. #8

    Default Re: Rod|Reel paring and beginner friendly setup

    Quote Originally Posted by silver creek View Post
    First of all, you have listed rods from 4 wt to 10 wt and lengths from 7' 6" to 9 feet in lengths. You need to scale it down to ONE main rod to start and that will be the rod you will use to learn how to fly cast! So choose either a trout or bass outfit. In my opinion, it will be easier to learn to cast a trout rod.

    The prototypical trout rod is a 9 ft 5 wt and you have NO 9 ft 5 wt rod listed. If you are mostly fishing lakes and larger streams and rivers, a 9 footer will be best. If you fish tight streams, go to a 8' 6" or even an 8' rod

    For 5 wt lines and above, get a WF Floating line. For 4 wt rods and rods and below, you can go with a DT lines.

    After you master the 5 wt rod, you can go up to a 6 or 7 wt rod for bass depending on how large the flies you will casting and the size of the bass you will be targeting. Again, I suggest a 9 footer.

    Start with a medium or medium fast action for your first trout rod. A medium action will be better for dry flies. A medium fast will be a better all arounder since a bit faster rod reacts faster for nymphing. For dries and nymphs in rivers, a floating line is all that is needed. I generally recommend a medium fast action since it is a better all around action which will allow you to also cast streamers a bit better than a medium action rod.

    For reservoirs, an intermediate fly line is the most versatile line. It will float when treated with folatant and sink if untreated. However, you can use the floating line to start.

    Here's the deal with fly line. You are a beginner. If you will ALWAYS practice your casting on water, you can buy a good quality fly line to start. However, almost all beginners practice on grass and grass damages fly line. So if you are going to practice casting on grass, I would start with a medium quality line. Buy one on sale on a site like Sierra Trading post one it reopens after the CV-19 closure.

    Thanks Silver, My post was long-winded, but you might not have caught where the rods listed were my Dads that I now have, so I was trying to pick one from that list to learn on. Based on your recommendations, I'm guessing this setup would be my best bet: Reel: 6806 Abel #5 Rod: Sage sp 589-5 Graphite Durascrim 4 2 3/16 oz #5 line 8'9", it is close to 9 ft.

    Thanks for all the advise...I didn't stop to think about the grass issue!

    Larry

  12. #9

    Default Re: Rod|Reel paring and beginner friendly setup

    Quote Originally Posted by Espo66 View Post
    Thanks Silver, My post was long-winded, but you might not have caught where the rods listed were my Dads that I now have, so I was trying to pick one from that list to learn on. Based on your recommendations, I'm guessing this setup would be my best bet: Reel: 6806 Abel #5 Rod: Sage sp 589-5 Graphite Durascrim 4 2 3/16 oz #5 line 8'9", it is close to 9 ft.

    Thanks for all the advise...I didn't stop to think about the grass issue!

    Larry
    I did not get that those were your dad's outfits. Sorry about the confusion on my part.

    I agree that the 5 wt would be the one to try. Try at first with the line that is on the reel.
    Regards,

    Silver



    "Discovery consists of seeing what everybody has seen and thinking what nobody has thought"..........Szent-Gyorgy

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  14. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    D'Iberville Ms
    Posts
    934

    Default Re: Rod|Reel paring and beginner friendly setup

    That same model SP rod was my first true trout sized fly rod. It cast great and I think it will be a good rod to learn on.

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