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Thread: Married Wing Wet Flies

  1. #1
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    Default Married Wing Wet Flies

    I've been fooling around with some winged wet fly patterns lately, but hadn't ever ventured into the area of married wings. Well, I gave it a try yesterday on an old pattern called Parmachene Belle. It's an interesting technique and one where you can (or at least I can) end up throwing away a lot of material. So far, I like the technique; but it's time consuming and I sense that there's a long, long ways to go before I'll ever be able to get comfortable with it.

    Does anyone out there have experience with married wing wets? If so, I could really use some pointers.

    Here's a pic of my first PB:



    I have a Jock Scott salmon fly pattern in mind; eventually, but it's only a very distant vision at this point.

    Pocono

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Married Wing Wet Flies

    keep practicing, that one looks good. Buy only really good wing pairs. are you counting the fibers in each section ?
    sandfly/ bob
    (www.bigmeadowsflyshop.com)
    N.J.B.B.A. #2215

    I did not escape.....they gave me a day pass!
    from the outer edge of nowhere
    fly tying and fishing Gillie..

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Married Wing Wet Flies

    I'm just jumping on to say that is gorgeous Pocono. Looks like some skills there.
    You know that I've got no advice, but am looking forward to others input to learn.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Married Wing Wet Flies

    Quote Originally Posted by sandfly View Post
    Buy only really good wing pairs. are you counting the fibers in each section ?
    Bob,

    No, I eyeballed it. I used a bodkin to pick away at the fibers until I had something that looked reasonably proportioned. I'm sure that fiber counting is an important part of it. I'll give it a try on my next one.

    Thanks.

  5. Default Re: Married Wing Wet Flies

    Awesome!!!!!~

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Married Wing Wet Flies

    Allan,

    Looks like a pretty good start for you there. I read your post earlier and sat down to tie a fly prior to making any comment. I did a lot of this type of fly tying in the 1978 - 1988 period. During that time I had discovered the Maritime Provinces and was in love with the Atlantic fishing. I still have many of my flies from that time but thought to wrap a fresh one so I could remind myself why I don't dress many patterns having married wings. Even with practice they are laborious. Back when I made many of them I had the business spot on. However with this type of work I am traumatised when I loose a fly to the bottom.

    I do tie a few but not many. I favour a large version of the Brook Fin for fishing here but since you mentioned a Jock Scott I went snooping in my stuff to see if I had enough material to get close.

    Below is a dressed down version with no horns. (I would call this River quality) This takes about 90 minutes 30 of which were spent making wings (a bit out of shape I guess) for me that is way too long for tying one fly. If the wings are done well they will hold up to the rigors of catching fish, I have a Silver Doctor which I have caught three salmon and one very nice trout on and it is still good to go. I may take a photo of it and post to this thread with it.

    [IMG][/IMG]

    I think everyone should tie a few classic style flies just to gain the experience. After this type of vise work turning out a #18 Blue Quill will seem to be a cake walk. You will be surprised at how this style of tying will improve all your flies. Believe it or not I can still tie dry flies and do a good job of my Northern Tier / Catskill style tying. I don't make them now because I have no call for them but it is like riding a bike, one does not forget.

    The only advice I can give for the wings is to do it until you have it down, then you be rounding out your tying skills.
    Last edited by Ard; 12-29-2009 at 02:37 AM. Reason: Duh

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Married Wing Wet Flies

    Allan and Ard: Very nice work!

    Larry

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Married Wing Wet Flies

    Thank you Larry,

    I believe Allan will do just fine with his wet flies and salmon tying. There is little I could say to improve on what he had done.

    Ard
    Last edited by Ard; 12-29-2009 at 02:36 AM. Reason: Duh

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Married Wing Wet Flies

    Guys your flies are as just beautiful as a youg bride
    Ard will you please stop calling Allan ...Allen

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Married Wing Wet Flies

    Ard,

    That's a beautiful tie. If I'm counting correctly, that's 5 married sections per wing - it that right? I'm going to stay with 2's; maybe 3's for now.

    There's another married wet fly that I'm interested in tying up; it's called Fontinalis. The married wing on that fly is supposed to be an imitation of a Brookie fin; orange body, a small gray strip near the top and a small white strip on top.

    I read that in yesteryears, old trout fishermen used to catch a Brookie, cut the ventral fins off and put them on a hook to catch larger trout. That, as I understand it, is the genesis of the Fontinalis pattern. Here's a pic of that fly from Bergman's book: Trout:

    Untitled Document

    Being a huge Brookie fan, I can't pass that one up!

    The richness of fly fishing history, particularly the regional variations of fly patterns, how they evolved, what the rationale was for a particular pattern, etc., is starting to be one of the key things that keeps me in this sport.

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