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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
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    Default Re: What Materials do you use to make Dubbing

    Lee,

    I never would have thought of that. It sounds like you have this to a science and were just asking what others do for dubbing materials. I thought you were trying to get ideas of what you should use to get started. Canned air what will they think of next

    Ard

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  2. #12

    Default Re: What Materials do you use to make Dubbing

    Thanks Ard but I am just a neophyte. When I first started tying over the winter, I purchased a squirrel skin and shaved it to use for dubbing. It is basically brown and brown and oh yeah brown. I did mix it with some of my darker (green, rust, etc) dry fly dubbings (using canned air) to give me something that is more buggy for my nymph patterns. I figured if I could learn how to "really" make dubbing, I could do something with my lighter color dry fly dubbings as well.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Upper Mojave Desert
    Posts
    1,823

    Default Re: What Materials do you use to make Dubbing

    Thank you for the tip with the canned air whalensdad.
    Another way to get a wide range of colors is to take a hare's mask; take some from the cheek (light tan), some from between the eyes (dark brown), etc. A natural, and an olive hare's mask and you've got most colored bodies.

  4. #14

    Default Re: What Materials do you use to make Dubbing

    Thanks. I think I need to find a white hare.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Northern California, USA
    Posts
    357

    Default Re: What Materials do you use to make Dubbing

    Go ask Alice... [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WANNqr-vcx0]YouTube - Jefferson Airplane -White Rabbit-[/ame]

  6. Likes il_wi_fishing liked this post
  7. #16

    Default Re: What Materials do you use to make Dubbing


  8. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
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    Default Re: What Materials do you use to make Dubbing

    Hi Lee,

    I read your reply a few posts back. You would laugh at how I blend stuff to make my dubbed bodies. It sounds like you are taking this seriously.

    Ard

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  9. #18

    Default Re: What Materials do you use to make Dubbing

    Ok guys here is a good laugh for you i have used the lent out of the dryer trap if it looks like a color i would like maybe a gray or light pink shade and it does work even though ya'll are laughing at the thought of that..

  10. #19
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Northern California, USA
    Posts
    357

    Default Re: What Materials do you use to make Dubbing

    Yeah? Try the balls of fluff that form in the car from the carpeting... mine is gray, the wife's is tan, the daughter's is black =) Still haven't found anyone with an olive carpet... but I've got a line on a rust one !!

  11. #20

    Default Re: What Materials do you use to make Dubbing

    I am considering making my own dubbing blends after reading singlebarbed and roughfisher, as they can tie up some really unique patterns in colors you can't find in the fly shop.

    I recommend digging around on singlebarbed.com, as he has dozens of posts on dubbing creation. I recently read one that discusses lightening materials using hydrogen peroxide. You just let your materials sit in the liquid, fully submerged, check on it once a day until it's light enough for you. He brought a dark beaver pelt up to a nice ginger/blonde color in about 96 hours.

    He's also got a pretty cool article on the initial stages of dubbing: Nothing makes the fur fly like using the wife’s coffee grinder | Singlebarbed

    He basically says to use a filler (cheap material for body), a wrapper (thicker guard hairs or synthetics), a binder (fine hair) and then add special effects from there. Also some good notes on where to source materials.

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