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  1. #1

    Default Fly durability...

    Why is it the simplest fly, the one that falls apart the quickest?

    Am I doing something wrong? Poor material selection?

    My San Juan worms never seem to want to stay together very long. After a few fish and casts, the chenille wants to "unwind" or come off the core.

    Does anybody else have this problem? I'm using all different brands and colors, but they never seem to be as durable as other flys in my arsenal.

    Good thing they are an easy and quick tie since they tend to fall apart much quicker! But is sure is a pain in the butt having to tie on another fly after only a few fish!
    My fishing in Colorado Blog: http://coloradofly.blogspot.com//

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Philadelphia Pa
    Posts
    2,017

    Default Re: Fly durability...

    quick tip for sealing the end of San Juan Chenille is to lightly burn the end of the material. This has a dual effect, binds the chenille, and creates the look of the head of a worm/maggot with darker material.
    Eunan



    Addicted To Vise Flies

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Manning, S. C. (formerly MD)
    Posts
    3,013

    Default Re: Fly durability...

    quick tip for sealing the end of San Juan Chenille is to lightly burn the end of the material.
    If you're not doing this already, then it will help, but fact is, chenille is not a very durable material for this purpose. But, it's what most folks use, because it seems to have the best action. Using "ultra" type chenilles, which are denser than regular chenille helps too.

    Chenilles are fine for wrapping bodies, like on Woolly Buggers, but for free form purposes, they don't hold up well.

    I've even tried to add some twist to the chenille, twisting it more tightly in my fingers, then adding a drop of super glue gel near where I want the end to be, then once the glue dries cutting off the excess. This helps too, but they still come unraveled, and you don't get the same affect as the burning.

    You can double the chenille & twist it over itself, but that makes a larger diameter worm, not well suited for smaller size hooks. The only other way to make worms more durable, without adding a lot of bulk, is to use another material for the extended section, like chamois and color it with permanent markers. Unfortunately, you won't likely get the color as nice as what you get with chenille!
    Remember, no one likes to be behind the big truck, but that's better than being under it!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Fly durability...

    x2 for what others said. But if you're catching fish, burning through some easy to tie flies isn't too bad a price to pay

  5. #5

    Default Re: Fly durability...

    Quote Originally Posted by s fontinalis View Post
    quick tip for sealing the end of San Juan Chenille is to lightly burn the end of the material. This has a dual effect, binds the chenille, and creates the look of the head of a worm/maggot with darker material.
    Yep, doing that already, it just seems to fall apart at where it's tied to the hook.
    My fishing in Colorado Blog: http://coloradofly.blogspot.com//

  6. #6

    Default Re: Fly durability...

    Quote Originally Posted by vitesse304 View Post
    Yep, doing that already, it just seems to fall apart at where it's tied to the hook.
    Is it possible that the thread is to fine or your wrapping it too tite and cutting the chenille?

    Dave
    I was going fly fishing until my wife suggested it, now I can't tell who is outsmarting who!

    Being "one with nature" requires a knowledge of what animals are living nearby and a weapon of sufficient magnitude to give you at minimum an equal chance of survival. No one has an invisible aura that animals can detect and sense your good intentions.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Fly durability...

    Quote Originally Posted by littledavid123 View Post
    Is it possible that the thread is to fine or your wrapping it too tite and cutting the chenille?

    Dave
    Maybe...but I thought you could never wrap it too tight? Considering I'm fastening it to the hook, I thought tighter is better...I guess I could try some with a little less pressure.

    I'm using a 140 and a 70 thread for mine. The 70 is for my micros that are tied to a size 18.
    My fishing in Colorado Blog: http://coloradofly.blogspot.com//

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Northern California, USA
    Posts
    357

    Default Re: Fly durability...

    What about laying down an even thread base and placing a thin coat of Flexament or silicone on it, then placing the chenille on top of that and letting it dry a bit before tying it down?

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