Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  14
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 40

Thread: Spey weight for largemouth

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Brookline, MA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    But an 8wt spey is not comparable to an 8wt single hander. Speys are stiffer by nature. An 8 weight spey can handle large salmon and steelhead that are much heavier and fight harder than a largemouth. An 8wt spey would be more like a 9/10wt single hander, which I would never use for largemouth.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    There are plenty of Spey Rods out there that you can feel flex and load all the way down into the upper grip.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Brookline, MA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    I'm sure they all load well for casting their appropriate lines. But I'm looking for the right wt rod that a 2 or 3lb largemouth can actually bend more than a twitch at the top ferrule.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Lake of the Woods/Rainy River Minnesota Canada border
    Posts
    4,752

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Quote Originally Posted by nick k View Post
    but it is true that Spey rods are stiffer than single handers, and a 10/11 weight single can be used to catch big game saltwater fish.

    I do want to be able to cast a certain distance, but there's no point if the fish can't even bend the rod when he's hooked. I don't want it to feel like I'm dragging it in with a steel bar.

    To this point I think I might agree with the orvis people.
    That's mostly not true. Scandi and Skagit rods are stiff, but only by two hand standards. A classic spey action is a slow rod. None of my two handers are fast stiff rods. I may or may not have mentioned that I have caught a lot of Bass on two handers. I have a 15 ft. 10/11 wt. that has seen a fair number of fish. Both Walleye and Bass, and Walleye don't fight as well as Bass do. I have never thought, "Oh my, this would be so much more fun on a girlie little rod!" There seems to be a lot of this wrong idea floating around out there, in fact this is the second time I have addressed it just this morning.

    First of all, the rod weights are determined by what weight it takes to load the rod. Go pick up the head on a 5wt. line and the head on a 10 wt. line and tell me if you think that tiny difference is going to make the difference between feeling a fish fight and not. This whole idea that "Oh you can't use that rod for Bass because it's a Salmon rod" is a giant load of horse manure. Try it with single hand lines but just use the first 30' and tell me if you think it's going to make your rod act like a steel rod.

    Rod weights are for throwing lines. Line wieights are for throwing flies. Like with a spinning rod, you can cast more weight farther. All of this talk that "that is to much rod for that fish" nonsense is rediculous. Especially when you are talking about Bass.

    Seriously, where does it say anywhere on a rod what fish it's for? If the Orvis people said something contrary to that, they were from the clothing department and don't fish.

    Quote Originally Posted by nick k View Post
    But I'm looking for the right wt rod that a 2 or 3lb largemouth can actually bend more than a twitch at the top ferrule.
    All of them do.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Brookline, MA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Diver,

    I'm sure you have way more experience with my on spey rods and I certainly respect your opinion and advice here, but the weight of any rod means more than simply the line it should throw. Heavier weight rods are stiffer than lighter weight rods, regardless of the line they are throwing. A 10/11wt rod (spey or standard) has the backbone built in the fight large fish and be able to muscle them around. If the rod has the capability to turn a very large steelhead, or even a larger saltwater fish (maybe 50+lbs), it will most definitely be FAR too much muscle for bass.

    But this is where it sorts out into preference. Some people just want to be able to cast far and hook fish. If this is what you want, then yes I agree that bigger is probably better and with every weight up you will gain distance. If your are someone who likes to undersize rod and cares more for the fight than the number of fish, then going bigger becomes counter productive at whatever point the rod has too much muscle built in for your target species.

    I will take one good fight with a bass over 2 bass I pull in skimming across the top any day. With a 10/11 weight spey, a good fight with even a 5lb bass is out of the question. You will be able to cast super far and pull in him and all his buddies, but what is it worth at the end of the day if you might as well have hooked them up to a winch and winded them in.

    Like I said, at a certain point this becomes personal preference, at that is what the people at Orvis were getting at when they steered me away. I think most anglers would prefer quality over quantity. This is not true for everyone, however, and I don't fault any angler for the way they like to catch fish. I can just tell you that a 10/11 weight is WAY out of the question for any fishing I'll be doing. I could probably pull the bass, his bed, and all his fry in it to shore with that thing.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Lake of the Woods/Rainy River Minnesota Canada border
    Posts
    4,752

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Quote Originally Posted by nick k View Post
    Diver,

    I'm sure you have way more experience with my on spey rods and I certainly respect your opinion and advice here, but the weight of any rod means more than simply the line it should throw. Heavier weight rods are stiffer than lighter weight rods, regardless of the line they are throwing. A 10/11wt rod (spey or standard) has the backbone built in the fight large fish and be able to muscle them around. If the rod has the capability to turn a very large steelhead, or even a larger saltwater fish (maybe 50+lbs), it will most definitely be FAR too much muscle for bass.

    But this is where it sorts out into preference. Some people just want to be able to cast far and hook fish. If this is what you want, then yes I agree that bigger is probably better and with every weight up you will gain distance. If your are someone who likes to undersize rod and cares more for the fight than the number of fish, then going bigger becomes counter productive at whatever point the rod has too much muscle built in for your target species.

    I will take one good fight with a bass over 2 bass I pull in skimming across the top any day. With a 10/11 weight spey, a good fight with even a 5lb bass is out of the question. You will be able to cast super far and pull in him and all his buddies, but what is it worth at the end of the day if you might as well have hooked them up to a winch and winded them in.

    Like I said, at a certain point this becomes personal preference, at that is what the people at Orvis were getting at when they steered me away. I think most anglers would prefer quality over quantity. This is not true for everyone, however, and I don't fault any angler for the way they like to catch fish. I can just tell you that a 10/11 weight is WAY out of the question for any fishing I'll be doing. I could probably pull the bass, his bed, and all his fry in it to shore with that thing.
    This has nothing to do with preference. It is what the reallity of the rods is. You say backbone to land big fish. That is a misconception as well. Again, it's the way a rods weight is determined. I can land a big fish on a 5 wt. and a small fish on a 15 8/9 and have the fish niether be overpowered by the rod nor the undergunned for the fish.
    Smallie on a 15' 8/9 wt. rod

    Big Pike on a 9' 5 wt. rod


    The point here is, that 5 has the backbone for the big fish. The two hander was not overgunning the Smallie to where it did not "twitch the rod". This is not a matter of preference. It is the physics of how the rods are made and rated. Seriously, as I said in the first one I had today about this (not this thread) take 23 pennies and put them in your hand. That is the difference between loading a 5 and an 8 single hand rod. Are you going to tell me that there is less difference in how a Salmon fights and a Smallouth fights than 23 pennies will put on your hand?

    I kicked that Pike's butt fast enough I did not have to work it to get it to swim away. That Smallie bent my rod over and put up a very fun fight. It's called physics not preference. That line "With a 10/11 weight spey, a good fight with even a 5lb bass is out of the question" is just flat wrong.


    I'll bet you $5 that not a single one of the people who wrongly stuck this stuff in your head actually fish for Bass with a two hander. I do. If you want to listen to Bob in the Orvis underwear department, feel free.

  7. Likes leithel liked this post
  8. #17

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Quote Originally Posted by nick k View Post
    I'm sure they all load well for casting their appropriate lines. But I'm looking for the right wt rod that a 2 or 3lb largemouth can actually bend more than a twitch at the top ferrule.
    In my pm to you I gave you my opinion of what would work for your situation. I have an Echo DH 11' 9" 4wt that will work dandy for the fish size you've listed but I won't be tossing the size and type of flies you will be, so.....I still think a 5 or probably more like a 6 is the ticket for you. Both of these rods will give you the feel of the fish your wanting.

  9. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Lake of the Woods/Rainy River Minnesota Canada border
    Posts
    4,752

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Quote Originally Posted by fysh View Post
    In my pm to you I gave you my opinion .....
    Yah, there you go, let fysh take it from here.

  10. #19

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Ahhh gee whiz, no, but thanks, I'm done here.

  11. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Knoxville Tn
    Posts
    369

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Decho 11'9" 4wt just came on this forum , makes for a great trout bass Spey.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-29-2012, 03:10 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-21-2012, 12:40 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-02-2012, 08:10 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-12-2012, 07:30 PM
  5. First largemouth
    By wjc in forum Warmwater Fly Fishing
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-29-2010, 11:17 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •