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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Lake of the Woods/Rainy River Minnesota Canada border
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    4,752

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    As I said, to small and now I'm done. If you buy it, you will be looking for a bigger one before July. That or you will think you suck at it and quit. I can only repeat something so many times before I quit. I have hit that number. So since fysh is not going to be the go to, guess you are on your own.

  2. Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    I'm curious to see anglers cast big bass flies on most 5-weight spey lines.

    Randy

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Brookline, MA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Quote Originally Posted by randyflycaster View Post
    I'm curious to see anglers cast big bass flies on most 5-weight spey lines.

    Randy
    Why so? You think 5 is too light for big flies?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Akron Ohio (don't let that fool you)
    Posts
    1,987

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Nick are you going to use this rig for just bass fishing? While I can understand anyone's desire to try a spey out, bass fishing in a lake is not where it excels. How often with a single hander have you had a bass follow all the way to the tip of the rod as you strip? With a spey you just turned that fish off 4 feet faster than you would with a 9 foot rod, could mean the difference between a fish and a skunk. Spey was conceived to present a swung fly to fish in a river that couldn't be reached with a single hander. Its not a tool to make pinpoint accurate casts, it can but it takes a great deal of practice to get the kind of accuracy that comes into play chasing bass. Bass like a stripped fly, with spey rods all you are doing is stripping in the running line back to the head, cast, swing, step and repeat. They're not streamer stripping rods, if you strip the whole head in now you have to work that whole head out which is a pain and not exactly stealthy when wading in the shallows of a lake or pond. Granted that fly fishing in general is a sport where we limit ourselves and make it challenging but spey rods are specialized tools that do there best in a certain set of conditions and in my opinion its not in still water fishing to structure oriented bass. I could challenge myself to frame a house with a ball peen hammer but wouldn't make more sense to use the proper hammer? The right hammer in this situation and in my opinion is a 7'6" to 9' rod an Ambush line or a bass bug taper and single hand spey casts. Save the spey for rivers where the single hand rod is out gunned by the conditions.
    Oh I live to be the ruler of life not a slave

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  6. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Lake of the Woods/Rainy River Minnesota Canada border
    Posts
    4,752

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Quote Originally Posted by nick k View Post
    Why so? You think 5 is too light for big flies?
    Oh no...... You do what the T-Shirt guy said. Don't listen to someone who does it. Video it for us though.

  7. Likes wt bash liked this post
  8. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Brookline, MA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Diver,

    As I said before, I respect your opinions on here. I like you, you are a good guy and have provided me with a lot of help and I do appreciate it. I don't want to be rude here but at the end of the day this is my decision and (granted I know very little about spey and you are probably an expert), I don't think that 99% of people would suggest anything about an 8wt spey for my type of fishing and you are telling me that a 10/11wt would be good.

    Again, I don't want to have an argument here, I value your input, but I'm going to go the other way on this one. We have different preferences here.

  9. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Akron Ohio (don't let that fool you)
    Posts
    1,987

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Going by your posts here and the other site it seems you a dead set on a spey, but I suggest you try out a spey "loaner" under the conditions you plan to use it to see if it even makes sense. That's alot of coin to drop between rod/reel/line and so on and to find out, despite good advice on both boards, that it might not be the best tool for the job. Which is also why learning to single hand spey cast makes even more sense. And no offense to the shop guys but just because some shop has a certain rod in stock doesn't mean they are proficient in how to use it, where as the folks here and the other forum have been fishing speys and switch rods long before their popularity hit the level its at now.
    Oh I live to be the ruler of life not a slave

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  11. Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    I can only comment from my own experience. I have a 6/7 12.5' spey rod. I often use a Rage line (Scandi/Skagit hybrid), and feel that I'm limited to using flies - especially poppers - that are often not as big as I would like to use.

    If I had to do it over again, I'd buy a little heavier rod (or perhaps just a 6/7 Skagit line).

    My two cents.

    Randy

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  13. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Brookline, MA
    Posts
    1,241

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    Quote Originally Posted by randyflycaster View Post
    I can only comment from my own experience. I have a 6/7 12.5' spey rod. I often use a Rage line (Scandi/Skagit hybrid), and feel that I'm limited to using flies - especially poppers - that are often not as big as I would like to use.

    If I had to do it over again, I'd buy a little heavier rod (or perhaps just a 6/7 Skagit line).

    My two cents.

    Randy
    Very helpful, thanks for this.

  14. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
    Posts
    15,410
    Blog Entries
    111

    Default Re: Spey weight for largemouth

    I see that this is still going on, Bill (wt bash) has made some really good points and I can relate to what he says based on what I've learned in the past few years. While fishing in the lake at our cabin in summer of 2011 I had a very large pike come after the fly and grab hold while I was sweeping the line for what is called a perry poke cast. When the fish hit, the rod was pointed over my right shoulder (I was standing at the bow of our boat) and there was no way I could set the hook. I saw the pike coming after the fly but was helpless to do anything but watch. The fish went on under the boat and it was quite a circus until the hook came loose.

    Point from what Bill said is; had I been using my 9' 9 weight I would have had that salmon killer in all likelihood. I do not like using the Spey rods in still water.

    Getting back to the rod / line weight issue, I have no problems tying a small fly (say a #6 or 8 Bartleet hook) to a 700 grain or heavier line and proper leader. The heavy line and rod will cast it beautifully. Likewise I can attach a 36" lead head and a size 2/0 salmon fly and the rod and line will cast it beautifully. I believe the point of some recommending a heavier rod equates to this; you can easily catch a small fish on a big rod but catching a big fish on a small rod is not really very sporting if you are C&R fishing.

    The recurring theme of a fish not even bending a #7 or 8 Spey rod is just not correct. I have caught many grayling with none over 2 pounds on a 13' #8 Spey rod and it was wonderful. Of course I am fishing in rivers with substantial currents and depth which combine to make the fish always feel larger than they turn out to be. If I were using a wispy rod landing a fish, even a small one in current would take a long and cruel time for the hapless fish. I do however believe that where I fish grayling, one of these days I'm going to hook a 4+ pound fish and the rod will be handy then. I frequently have a salmon get on the fly while grayling fishing in fall and again the heavier rod is appreciated. If your mind is made up then so it is and everyone here will wish you well with whatever rod you buy. Remember, you can always use a heavier leader to compensate for a lighter rod but heaving large flies and sink tips may become troublesome.

    Ard

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

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