Thanks Thanks:  2
Likes Likes:  37
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
  1. #11

    Default Re: Fighting & Landing Big Fish;

    Not to side track this wonderful thread, but I didn't know the AK Kings were in such decline. So sad, I hope to one day land a beast on the spey rod up there.


    I feel the same way about our wild steelhead and native brook trout. Can't kill them anymore. There are other good fish to eat.


    I'll post more here tonight, and have a few questions.

  2. Thanks Ard thanked for this post
  3. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
    Posts
    16,021
    Blog Entries
    121

    Default Re: Fighting & Landing Big Fish;

    Hi Steve,

    The second shoe hasn't dropped yet but it's safe to say things aren't what they once were numbers wise. The king salmon to the best of my knowledge of the species has never enjoyed the proliferation in numbers as any of the other 4 Pacific salmon. This is due in part to their size and requirements for reproduction. In a nutshell, a pair of kings being a 35 pound hen and a fifty pound male take up a lot of space in a headwater area. This fish also has specific needs when it comes to the bottom substrate size of the river or creek channel. Today there are many things both known and unknown which are inhibiting the run numbers and harvest of escapement adults is one of the factors involved in the decline.

    I won't ever kill another and even when sockeye or silver fishing for harvest I release every hen.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

  4. Likes unknownflyman, mcnerney, N/A liked this post
  5. #13

    Default Re: Fighting & Landing Big Fish;

    I Re read your excellent article, Ard and I can see where I'm screwing up and losing big fish. Striking too fast, lifting rod high, on jumping and rolling fish, my rod is at the wrong angle, I've been fishing the Spey rod like a big single hander and striking like I'm drifting even when I've given the fish some time.

    Since in talking to some fellow Spey fishers all said to not lift the rod at all and lower the rod when the fish catches air.

  6. Thanks Ard thanked for this post
  7. #14

    Default Re: Fighting & Landing Big Fish;

    Excellent advice.

    Working, unfortunately. on way less experience with the big ones, I would pass on one tip that has helped me greatly when so engaged.

    Do not let a big one rest. During a prolonged fight they will try to, in effect, sit down. Nagging them out of this rest spot with firm but gentle side pressure keeps them off balance and evens angers them into another energy expanding run. (Using the stength in the mid section of the rod rather than the relying mainly on the butt gives me all the nagging power I need.) My landed to lost ratio changed greatly in my favor after I was coached in this approach.

    I also tend to believe big fish landed in shorter fights tend to survive better than those who deeply expend all their energy over a prolonged fight.

    Tight lines,
    DDB

  8. Likes Ard, N/A, littledavid123 liked this post
  9. #15
    smcnearn Guest

    Default Fighting & Landing Big Fish;

    From my chubby trout experience ...

    One thing about big fish in rivers: Iím 100% ready to chase up or downstream. Seeing backing is cool, but all that line out is no bueno! And a big fish with a ton of line out downstream is just long odds, how fast can you run over rocks in waders while keeping the rod steady and the line tight?

    One thing about big fish in lakes: get the fish off balance, left/right, never let them go straight. Once theyve adjusted to pressure from the right, swap it to the left. Youíll see the fish lose its balance in the water. An off balance fish just canít put the power down the same way.

    One thing about fish flipping around on the surface, itís bad. The density of water slows down those head shakes, air doesnít. Making them a lot more powerful on the surface or while airborn. Hence them thar snapped lines and pulled hooks. I️ feel like an intuitive angler can encourage a salmonid to fight under the surface of the water to a certain extent (fish with arial tendencies excluded).

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. Likes flyminded, just4grins liked this post
  11. #16

    Default Re: Fighting & Landing Big Fish;

    Revisiting this thread, So what is the best action to take for very large leaping salmon on long rods, I have with other large fish lowered the rod with limited success, I really don’t want to introduce slack in the line as I’ve lost big fish like this and doing nothing really doesn’t help either.

    I’ve lost two large brown trout in fast deep water this spring by excessive pressure to stay connected low side pulling trying to get them out of the flow and straightened two hooks.

    Granted they were not Baltic Salmon or quality salmon hooks but when I’m out there with a 15’ rod in heavy current by myself with a sea beast on I better have some options in my brain.

  12. #17
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Truckee, CA.
    Posts
    2,270
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: Landing Big Fish;

    A young protege of mine, just discovered that if he pulled hard on the fish, the fish pulled harder.....go figure.....
    Now he understands a little less pull, but a gentle/firm pressure in the direction you want to take them to net.
    On the Truckee, we say, before you make that first cast and drift, look where you are going to run......
    For landing bigger fish, have a plan..........don't be surprised....

    Jim

  13. Likes mcnerney, unknownflyman liked this post
  14. #18

    Default Re: Fighting & Landing Big Fish;

    I had landed hundreds of salmon and steelhead in the great lakes, but my first few west coast steelhead made me panic. I'd never had a 7 pound fish rip off that much line that fast. I was worried that on the huge west coast rivers I would be spooled, so I ran after the fish. I would plan ahead to figure out how to get to the bank and chase a fish. Then I realized that all chasing after a running fish did was move the fight farther downstream and put me in danger of trippng and falling on slippery rocks. Now I relax, enjoy a fish's first run, and wait for it to stop, they almost always do and if they don't you probably weren't landing it anyway. Then I put on the pressure and they usually come back upstream, except if they've run through a set of rapids.
    Big west coast chinook are the exception. They sometimes don't want to stop, and running is the only way to keep from getting spooled.

  15. Likes unknownflyman liked this post
  16. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Bayou La Batre, AL
    Posts
    886

    Default Re: Fighting & Landing Big Fish;

    I took the top ten words in each paragraph and condensed the post down. Didn't make a lot of sense but it was a lot quicker read.
    Kevin
    "Fight like you're the 3rd monkey trying to get on Noah's Ark"
    "Not every day is filled with sunshine. Some days you're the pigeon, some days you're the statue"
    "If God had intended for man to only fish on weekends, He never would have created the other 5 days of the week."

  17. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
    Posts
    16,021
    Blog Entries
    121

    Default Re: Fighting & Landing Big Fish;

    Quote Originally Posted by unknownflyman View Post
    Revisiting this thread, So what is the best action to take for very large leaping salmon on long rods, I have with other large fish lowered the rod with limited success, I really don’t want to introduce slack in the line as I’ve lost big fish like this and doing nothing really doesn’t help either.
    Hi Steve,

    I don't get a lot of leapers but it happens. When it happens they usually repeat with several jumps in a row. If you notice that when a salmon leaps up the line is submerged and trailing downstream behind the fish it is a good time to raise the rod tip and get reeling. Any time the fish jumps or changes direction it is a good time to try to gain some line on the fish. To do so without putting more pressure on them can be tricky but I crank the reel fast as I can to shorten the game.

    Next jumper you get watch the line, unless the fish is going down and away (bad situation) the line will be trailing in a wide arc. That submerged line that leads all the way back to the rod tip is putting drag on the hook and therefor pulling at the hook. That pressure can dislodge the hook or as you stated hooks can bend. Jumper or not, if you're not using a full sinking line use every spare moment you can gather to keep your line on the surface and as short as possible without pulling harder on the fish. As other posts have said, the more you pull the more they pull back.

    It's a tricky thing to know when is the right time to try to move the fish nearer to you. I can't begin to describe how without actually being on the water with a fish hooked up to use as an example. Whether the fish are many or few I always follow the same techniques and if they are really hooked I lose very few. It's getting that hook in tight that matters.

    Anywhere can be the land of great expectations, broken dreams, or paradise found, it's all up to you.

    Life On The Line - Alaska Fishing with Ard
    Ard's Forum blog, Alaska Outdoors

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Landing big fish, alone
    By dwizum in forum Fly Fishing How To's
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: 05-27-2016, 02:20 PM
  2. Finger burn landing fish
    By maccoons in forum Fly Fishing How To's
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-14-2014, 09:20 AM
  3. Help landing fish
    By johnjav in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 08-10-2012, 09:54 PM
  4. Hooking and Landing Big Fish
    By webrx in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 12-21-2009, 11:11 PM
  5. Landing a Fish 101
    By Devils Onion in forum Coldwater Fly Fishing
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-11-2008, 08:24 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •