“Here we go again...”

sneakysalmon

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Senior citizen here. My fishing experience has been comprised of hunting for trout, steelhead and silvers in Oregon, Washington and Alaska. I have primarily been a bank fisherman using spinning equipment. I’ve never fly fished. The last few years my buddies and I have spent a week fishing for silvers on the Yakutat in Alaska. This last year we ran into shallow water and slow current, hardly enough to drag a lure in. The fly fishermen (and women), however, were having a ball! Believing in the adage that you’re never too old to learn, I’ve decided I want in on that fly fishing action next year when we (hopefully) head back to the Yakutat. In the seventies, my father in law gifted me with a Fenwick FF112S, fly line number 10. It still has the tag on it. I need suggestions on a reel for it. Second, I want to begin developing skills by picking up a trout fly rod setup. With this virus going around, looks like my teacher will be on video. Even though I’m new to fly fishing, I would rather buy decent equipment the first time. Any suggestions for a reel for the Fenwick and a trout setup would be much appreciated. Thanks for your time.
 

Ard

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Hi,

Senior citizen here also, if you are looking to fish for steelhead & salmon with a fly rod you might as well start with the right rod. A 10 weight Fenwick dated from the 70's will work but there are better tools for the task. If we weren't facing a Pandemic I'd tell you to get a flight up here in June and I'd take you fishing and teach you how to do it with 2 hand rods. I am however not looking to have any visiting anglers at all until 2021 at the earliest.
 

spm

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Welcome to the forum, sneakysalmon. I'm sure you will get plenty of suggestions, as the members here are always more than willing to help with questions.

steve
 

satyr

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Also, realize that any flyline that might have come with that rod is going to be as rotten as the rod. It doesn't cost a lot to get a decent graphite rod and a decent reel these days to do a little research and buy something that will do the job reasonably well. Fiberglass just isn't the tool for salmon, or trout IMO unless you are fishing tiny creeks.
 

WNCtroutstalker

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I’d like to keep rod and reel at $250 ballpark.
Normally I would suggest going to a local fly shop and casting some rods, but in the current environment that's not really possible. You might still call some local shops to pick their brains, but given your budget for a rod I'd suggest the Redington Classic Trout. They make the 5 wt in 8'6" and 9' lengths. It's got a moderate action (so not too stiff nor too flexing either), which I know many suggest is best for someone starting out. The CT lists for $150 but can often be found for less, around $120 or so. I wouldn't cheap out on the line (you don't need to spend $100 or even $80, but I wouldn't get something for $20 - the Scientific Anglers Frequency line sells for about $50 and is nice), and think that the reel is the place to skimp. I would look for something used or on closeout. Any modern reel should have a drag sufficient for 5 wt usage. Good luck to you.
 

fq13

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Dude, for reasons known but to God, there is a market for old glass rods. You might be able to sell that thing and buy mid a priced Tfo or Reddington outfit. I gave away an old Silaflex and realized I could have gotten four bills. No worries, the guy wanted it and I did'nt, but still ask around as to its value.
 

fq13

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Normally I would suggest going to a local fly shop and casting some rods, but in the current environment that's not really possible. You might still call some local shops to pick their brains, but given your budget for a rod I'd suggest the Redington Classic Trout. They make the 5 wt in 8'6" and 9' lengths. It's got a moderate action (so not too stiff nor too flexing either), which I know many suggest is best for someone starting out. The CT lists for $150 but can often be found for less, around $120 or so. I wouldn't cheap out on the line (you don't need to spend $100 or even $80, but I wouldn't get something for $20 - the Scientific Anglers Frequency line sells for about $50 and is nice), and think that the reel is the place to skimp. I would look for something used or on closeout. Any modern reel should have a drag sufficient for 5 wt usage. Good luck to you.
Amen to everything in this post. I have nothing to add except to repeat that you skimp on the reel and buy a good line as it does the work. I would go Rio or Scientific Anglers. Try Sierra trading post. It's like the Marshals of outdoor gear.I
I have owned two Reddington CTs and they are great rods. I still have and love my three weight. It's a solid piece of kit. Also look at Temple Fork Outfitters (TFO) in the Lefty Kreh series for around the same money. You won't impress gear snobs but both work. On a budget I would go Reddington CT all day, they are great rods for the money. Good luck and welcome to the dark side.
 
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Coloraskan

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This is a very timely post. Not quite senior citizen (mid 40's) but am in a similar situation. Grew up bass fishing with a spinning rod in Southern MO, learned to troll for walleye during college in Nebraska, moved to Maryland after college and learned bay and ocean fishing and recently moved to CO where fly fishing trout is the norm.

Similarly, I am looking to spend $300-$400 on a 5 wt trout set up and another $300-$400 on a smaller (3-4 wt?) set up for high Alpine streams. I backpack hike/camp and want to throw a line into some of these beautiful streams I hike to.

Not to hijack, but would appreciate any and all recommendations as well. I would love to go get lessons at a fly shop, but like everyone else, that isn't an option right now.

One wrinkle is I will likely be buying a couple of each outfits since my wife has decided she wants to give this a try as well. Any difference in gear recommendations between a mid 40's fat guy and a mid 40's not not fat wife?

Thanks folks. This site is an awesome resource for us beginners! Be safe and stay healthy!
 
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