7wt switch power

theSoapLord

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Im looking at buying a Sage Sonic in the 11’6” 7wt. I’ve heard some info that this will have the same power as a 9wt single hand and rod. So this makes me wonder if this would mean that a 7wt 2H could be used to target fish that would normally be fished on a 9wt SH. I would be fishing for steelhead, salmon, and the occasional carp all around the Pacific NW. Any input would be appreciated.
 

flav

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I have no experience with the Sonic, but I feel most 7 weight switches I've cast are closer to a SH 8 weight in fish fighting power. A 7 weight switch is about perfect for summer steelhead, a bit on the light side for many winter steelhead, maybe for silver salmon, a probably not for chums, and too light for kings.
 

Ard

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Another person who does not own a Sonic and don't know how robust they are.

Not meaning to post something in contrast to fellow member flav above but I've been using a 7 weight Hardy Swift 11 1/2 foot short Spey for ten years and ........... they (the Hardy and most other 7 weights) work well with a 475 grain Scandi line which is considerably heavier than an 8 or 9 weight single hand line. I believe that an 8 weight WF single hand line weighs 275 - 300 grains depending on brand and head length and a 9 comes in around 350 to 375 grains.

I have several Beulah Elixir lines that I snatched up that are sweet with 37 foot bellies and integrated running lines for the rods (I have several due to business needs) and recommend integrated lines if you can find them. As for fish power I've caught everything from river rainbows - grayling - steelhead trout - and all five species of Pacific salmon on the Swift with some truly large fish in the works. To be honest you should have a longer and more stout rod for truly heavy fish but for anything up to 20 pounds the 11 1/2 foot 7 weights will get it done.

I would make sure I could handle one to see how soft or firm the action is or would need the word from someone I trust before buying one though. I can vouch for the Hardys because I own 3 of them.
 

Lamarsh

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General rule when comparing switch rods to single hand when it comes to power is two line weights. I use a 7wt switch rod for salmon and steelhead, and it is more than enough. Here in the great lakes, an 8wt is plenty for our steelhead (7wt SH would be more ideal), and plenty for all salmon except hot fresh kings, where a 9 or 10wt SH would be more appropriate to at least keep them out of the wood. In addition to skagit, switch and scandi lines in varying grain weights, I also use a SA Anadro nymph WF floating line in 8wt on it (SA says to line up one weight with this line on a switch rod), and this particular line is technically weighted as a 9.5wt line as it is 1.5 line weights over weighted, and it works great. So yes, I think you're on the right track in generally considering your 7wt switch rod as having the power of a 9wt SH. Also, if it helps, my 7wt switch throws a 480g freightliner nicely. Hope this helps.
 

jjcm

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I generally fish a 7wt, be in single or double handed (but also really like the 8wt here), for steel and silvers. There have been a few times on some rivers that I found unusually heavy flows and even with the 8wt switch rod, some of the larger kings showed me how tough they can be. On kings, I would personally prefer to go up in rod weight and fish a 9 double hander or a 10 single hander.
 
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