Advantage of buying a new expensive rod over an older vintage rod

redietz

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Looked through posts made. Did not see any advantage mentioned. Or I missed it.
Most of the glass rods I have. Are refurbished oldies. Newest is an Eagle Claw, cheapie.
Advantage price. If you decide to go new.
Differences mentioned (whether they're advantages depends on your taste) lighter, faster, longer, and available in a wider range of configurations.

I fish both vintage and modern glass, and appreciate them both. They are, however, noticeably different.
 

trev

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It probably should be mentioned that not all new fiberglass fly rods are made of S-glass and not all 'vintage' rods were made of E-glass. They would have developed at about the same time along with A-glass, E-CR-glass, C-glass, D-glass, R-glass, T-glass and likely a few other variations depending on ingredients used and specific qualities desired. And what got used in a specific brand fly rod was secret. Bill Phillipson for example used "Eponite" in many of his early rods, a special, secret process; yet his rods look and work similar to others of the times.
The Epic blurb above is rather suspect too in that the fiberglass as used in fishing rod production was a WW2 invention by workers at Convair, resulting in several patents and the formation of at least three fishing rod companies at the end of the war by former aircraft employees. I believe that only the glass fiber was invented prior the war and that was first patented in the 1830s. Owens did invent a better way to produce glass wool in the late 1930s and the USN specified it for ship's insulation (building material not electrical)
Thus no fiberglass fishing rods really before about 1945.
I've read " the modulus rating of e-glass is approximately 10 mil and s-glass is approx 12 mil. " Compare to ~42 mil for IM6. S-glass and E-glass are much closer in stiffness than either is to graphite.
 

trev

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It probably should be mentioned that not all new fiberglass fly rods are made of S-glass and not all 'vintage' rods were made of E-glass. They would have developed at about the same time along with A-glass, E-CR-glass, C-glass, D-glass, R-glass, T-glass and likely a few other variations depending on ingredients used and specific qualities desired. And what got used in a specific brand fly rod was secret. Bill Phillipson for example used "Eponite" in many of his early rods, a special, secret process; yet his rods look and work similar to others of the times.
The Epic blurb above is rather suspect too in that the fiberglass as used in fishing rod production was a WW2 invention by workers at Convair, resulting in several patents and the formation of at least three fishing rod companies at the end of the war by former aircraft employees. I believe that only the glass fiber was invented prior the war and that was first patented in the 1830s. Owens did invent a better way to produce glass wool in the late 1930s and the USN specified it for ship's insulation (building material not electrical)
Thus no fiberglass fishing rods really before about 1945.
I've read " the modulus rating of e-glass is approximately 10 mil and s-glass is approx 12 mil. " Compare to ~42 mil for IM6. S-glass and E-glass are much closer in stiffness than either is to graphite.
 

pnc

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Kind of took all the things you mention for granted. And as said, they all become ones fancy. Or taste. So can getting a warranty be advantageous. Sure, but consider that part of price. Just hit me why the interest. In what is said to promote new products.
Most recent of refurbs is an old Shakespeare Wonder rod. Of the oldies I have. And converts from spin to fly. This rods throws line in a wider range of weights. Than anything else I have. Glass or graphite.
 
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Nonno

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I use two glass rods. My first fly rod, a Fenwick 8'6" 6wt, and a 8' 5wt Revival by Moonshine. I prefer using the Fenwick.
 

skunkedalot

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i also read through out the years that the vintage rods were heavy.
well after fishing 3 vintage fenwicks for the past several years, I do not buy into the heavier argument- my vintage fenwicks weigh 3 oz. and 3 1/4 oz. hardly noticeable. they were great rods when they were built in 1966 and 1973 and are just as great in 2022. if you have a chance to get a vintage fenwick or others from that era, do not hesitate. they are just great and fun to fish.
 

checch69

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Agreed,I took out my 5 piece Cortland 7' 6wt travel rod yesterday to throw in the snow. It felt like one of my 1-4 wt Orvis graphites which are under 2 1/2 oz. And it cast sweetly! Cheers,Chet
 

rsagebrush

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They make some very nice fiberglass nowadays, of course they cost quite a bit. I am quite happy with the ones I have, well they are the ones I kept then.
-Barclay - 71/2' 4pce 4/5wt parabolic
-Ijuin Yamogi - 6'6" 3pce parabolic
-Hardy Perfection - 71/2' 3pce, slow action
-Melenkovic (CTS Blank) 8' 4pce progressive 4/5 wt
-Tom Morgan Rodsmith's (Tom Morgan) 8'3" 4pce 6wt
-McFarland 71/2' 3pce 6wt
-McFarland 81/2' 4pce Parabolic 6wt
-Mcfarland 81/2' 4pce 5/6/7wt Hybrid
All are great fishing rods, quite a few I acquired used so there was a money savings there. The Japanese are producing some really nice fiberglass rods nowadays too.
If I were looking for a classic I would be looking for a Phillipson, JK Fisher, Winston or Russ Peak.
 
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