Anyone casting with an elbow replacement?

JoJer

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My right elbow is bone on bone. The left is getting there quick. Even specialists have very little good to say about elbow replacements. So far, casting isn't painful but I'm curious if anyone here has crossed this bridge.
 

MichaelCPA

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Not quite, but I have a bit of pain.

I like using my lighter rods, casting less. A fighting butt helps leverage big fish.

Lots of time in physio, strengthening, etc. Consider learning to cast with my other arm.
 

corn fed fins

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Maybe if it isn't hurting don't get it fixed. Lol.
Ignore it and it might go away? Lol

I know this won't answer your question but I'll offer some moral support.

In my time with Project Healing Waters I have helped guys with full on prosthetic arm(s), leg(s), paraplegics, blind, deaf, etc. Some had to adjust their cast to make it more comfortable but they could still cast and enjoy the sport. Guess what I'm getting at is if the will is there, so is the sport.

Hope it works out for you as one day I'll be asking the same question, just concerning my shoulders. Getting "older" sucks. Youth is wasted on the young. 😣

CFF
 

JoJer

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My PA suggested learning to cast left handed when I first got tennis elbow in my right arm (from casting). I just said "no" at the time. Since then, I have developed some ability there but I'm not sure the left has enough cartilage left to totally switch. I guess if the right hurts enough, I'll be more motivated. Chances are pretty good that by then the combination of arthritis in my feet, ankles, back and shoulder will keep me in the car anyway, so the casting thing won't matter much.
 

cooutlaw

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Many years ago I faced a progression of health deterioration with my father....his later days were handicapped by some debilitating effects from several strokes. His balance and leg strength was significantly lessened to a point of no longer walking very far even with cane/brace assistance, let alone wading even shallow streams...his arms were weakened and casting more than single shots was impossible....I opined in a thread some time ago that I had no issue fishing for the joy of the sport, especially with family and friends, with any type of tackle available. Together we transitioned our time together to fishing from shore with dries and small streamers on light short 3wt rods, that could be worked from a seated position and single casts from lawn chairs, an occasional small lake seated in an easy access boat, and then to ultra light spinning gear from lawn chairs at lakes, creeks and ponds that we could back a car almost down to. We had a blast, made some great memories and continued to fish together....we talked more, rested more, and really never missed a thing....it was just a new chapter that we embraced....different but just as much fun....we made it fun and were always excited to just fish......point being...where there is a will...there is a way.....as we age and face challenges we may change the methods, but we should never lose the passion. If you really want to fish...you can always find a way.

I'll also add this....I spent a great deal of my early career with 10-12 hour days spent in less than ideal climate control on concrete carrying heavy weight numerous times a day.....years later, and added sports and life injuries, I basically screw myself out of bed each morning, I have herniated and/or ruptured T3,T4, L1,L2, and S1 in my back with nerve damage added....my right side mobility is about 82%, both right and left ankles have sustained multiple breaks each...most fingers have been broken, one wrist, and several dislocated shoulders and elbows.......I generally hurt for the first two hours of each day and the last two hours before sleeping of each day...arthritis is coming on fast....I sometimes hobble around on bad days.....I still have no intention of stopping fishing until they pry the rod from my cold dead hands.
 
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dswice

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Many years ago I faced a progression of health deterioration with my father....his later days were handicapped by some debilitating effects from several strokes. His balance and leg strength was significantly lessened to a point of no longer walking very far even with cane/brace assistance, let alone wading even shallow streams...his arms were weakened and casting more than single shots was impossible....I opined in a thread some time ago that I had no issue fishing for the joy of the sport, especially with family and friends, with any type of tackle available. Together we transitioned our time together to fishing from shore with dries and small streamers on light short 3wt rods, that could be worked from a seated position and single casts from lawn chairs, an occasional small lake seated in an easy access boat, and then to ultra light spinning gear from lawn chairs at lakes, creeks and ponds that we could back a car almost down to. We had a blast, made some great memories and continued to fish together....we talked more, rested more, and really never missed a thing....it was just a new chapter that we embraced....different but just as much fun....we made it fun and were always excited to just fish......point being...where there is a will...there is a way.....as we age and face challenges we may change the methods, but we should never lose the passion. If you really want to fish...you can always find a way.

I'll also add this....I spent a great deal of my early career with 10-12 hour days spent in less than ideal climate control on concrete carrying heavy weight numerous times a day.....years later, and added sports and life injuries, I basically screw myself out of bed each morning, I have herniated and/or ruptured T3,T4, L1,L2, and S1 in my back with nerve damage added....my right side mobility is about 82%, both right and left ankles have sustained multiple breaks each...most fingers have been broken, one wrist, and several dislocated shoulders and elbows.......I generally hurt for the first two hours of each day and the last two hours before sleeping of each day...arthritis is coming on fast....I sometimes hobble around on bad days.....I still have no intention of stopping fishing until they pry the rod from my cold dead hands.
Thanks for your honest and authentic sharing regarding fishing with your dad in his later years, and about some of your own physical struggles. You are an inspiration to us all! Life certainly throws all of us unexpected and unwanted curve balls, but as you eloquently stated, it's how we choose to respond that makes all the difference. May you (and all our forum friends) enjoy many more years on the water.
 
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LePetomane

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For what it's worth, I an an anesthesiologist/intensivist with 35 years of experience with a fair amount of exposure to subspecialty orthopedics. I have not seen an elbow replacement performed in any of the institutions I have worked. If you do decide to have the procedure, volume is important. I would seek out the surgeon who does them on a regular basis. I wish you well.
 

JoJer

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Thanks to all who have and will post here on their experience in this area. I'll not be the last to raise this question. I'm indebted to all who help me see past my cynicism. I'm reminded daily of how lucky I am to be what and where I am.
Cooutlaw, I've had a couple of back surgeries and a bunch of screws back there. Turns out I had "misplaced" T4 at some time. Now T4 and T5 and S1 are all screwed together. Again, lucky: Someone told me to get a neurosurgeon, and I got a good one, and I had the insurance to pay for most of it.
LePetomane, Both the osteo surgeons I've seen agree that elbow replacements tend to fail "spectacularly". Not looking forward to that eventuality.
 

triggw

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After 2 years of epicondylitis (tennis elbow) an MRI showed that I was bone on bone in my right elbow. Had a radial head (partial elbow) replacement. They saw off the head of the radius and stick a thing in there that in the X-rays looks like a drawer knob. But it's made of cobalt-chromium. It took a couple of years after that for the inflammation and soreness to go away, but it's pretty good now. Lost some range of motion, but I had lost it before the surgery. I can throw a ball for my dog, which I couldn't have dreamed of doing before the surgery.
 

duker

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No experience with elbow replacements, but as Tim C. suggested you might want to consider switching to two-handed rods. Easier on your shoulder and arm, and a good choice for older fly fishers with creaky joints. And it's a good excuse to acquire a whole bunch of new fly gear.
 

JoJer

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I've owned a 14'9 wt spey for a few years. I haven't actually fished it, but I've had it on the water a few times and really enjoy casting it. I've noticed spey techniques have crept into my single hand casting.
 
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