Average Break in time for a pair of Simms G3 Guide boots

City Rat

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So I picked up a set of the G3 waders and while I was at the fly shop I tried on a set of G3 Guide wading boots. They felt like a stiff pair of GTX mountaineering boots. I know how to break those in and after some bending and a couple of weeks of constant wear around the house/town etc, I can have a set of GTX boots ready to get to work for me. I have not decided to pul the trigger on the G3s yet but I'd like to know is there an "average" break in time for the G3 Guide boots? Just trying to get a sense from folks here on what to expect as I realize that this is a very very subjective question. Also any tips or tricks from folks who own these on how they broke theirs in, would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

Ard

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This is something I've never really charted but it seems to me that an hour on the foot and in the water loosens them right up. Be sure they are big enough when you buy. If you wear them daily and they stay wet they are always broke in. If you allow them to dry out thoroughly between trips they will be stiff next time you put them on. Try not to allow them to bake in the trunk of a car or pickup bed. I leave my boots on the front porch here which is shaded and have a hanger for my waders right there by the door as well. Like I said, I haven't been out for 7 days so I expect them to be a bit stiff.

Remember, get them a tad on the large size. You don't want your foot swimming inside but wiggle room is important.
 

ia_trouter

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....Also any tips or tricks from folks who own these on how they broke theirs in, would be appreciated. Thanks.
I have G3s. I'd estimate they will break in about 10 times faster on the river than while typing on the internet. :D

Seriously though, they are a stout boot. They felt like skiing boots to me at first. My old waders were shot though. Hiking books they are not IMO. They'll start breaking in some after a few trips though. I love the ankle support they offer on big freestone streams. A really tough boot I'd buy again.
 

City Rat

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I am glad to hear this feedback, that they will break in after some use. I will try on the Orvis Guide boots, same price, very similar feature set tomorrow, while the feel of the Simms boot is still fresh. Too bad both aren't sold in the same place or I'd be done with this decision by now. I'll know as soon as I get the Orvis boot on if that is the boot for me or not. It is either going to feel more like a natural fit right out of the gate or not and if not and I have to break both in then I'll go with the known durability of the Simms and be done with this nonsense. I can't wait to get back out on the water this weekend. Thanks.
 

el jefe

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Of all the footwear I own, I have never given a thought to breaking in wading boots. After one to two pairs of socks (depending on the time of year), a thick neoprene bootie, and possibly stirrups from cold weather gear, the foot is so isolated from the boot that I have never had any issues just putting them on the first time and going fishing.
 

benglish

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GREAT boots. Probably the best on the market. I do recommend a shoe tree for storage. The leather (faux leather?) will shrink. Rinsing after use, shoe tree, and occasionally oiling the soft parts, they will always fit and last WELL past a couple pairs of waders. Also, I suggest rubber cleated. If you take care of them the rubber soles will wear out before any other part. Then you can order felt bottoms and that "special glue" which will literally kill you in a closed room, and make yourself a pair of felts for about $20! Buy another cleated and you have two! I did this and have not bought wading boots in nearly a decade.
 

City Rat

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GREAT boots. Probably the best on the market. I do recommend a shoe tree for storage. The leather (faux leather?) will shrink. Rinsing after use, shoe tree, and occasionally oiling the soft parts, they will always fit and last WELL past a couple pairs of waders. Also, I suggest rubber cleated. If you take care of them the rubber soles will wear out before any other part. Then you can order felt bottoms and that "special glue" which will literally kill you in a closed room, and make yourself a pair of felts for about $20! Buy another cleated and you have two! I did this and have not bought wading boots in nearly a decade.
Wow! I love suggestions like this which allow you to bring a good thing back from the brink of extinction. Thanks. BTW, what's the name of that glue and type of replacement felt and a source for it? I'd like to make a note of both for future reference. Thanks again.
 

City Rat

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I used the stuff here:

Hodgman Felt Sole Replacement Kit : FishUSA

Discontinued though. Not surprised, felt soles are becoming less popular and the fumes from that glue really could kill a man. This will give you a start though. Google "felt sole kit" Good grinder, belt sander, anti dust mask also helps.
Thanks, great info. Also, you mentioned "oiling"soft parts. Which soft parts, there aren't many? Last, what kind of oil do you use when you do this?
 

iv_wjb

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If you have the opportunity, try-on the Hodgman Vion. Awesome boots; comfortable, stable and versatile, right out of the box.
 

benglish

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Like is said my boots are pretty old but the uppers on my boots are leather (or faux leather). Toe cap and out sole are the hard black rubber. Whatever they are made from, they will dry out so I use Kiwi conditioning oil. Same for any leather product.
 

City Rat

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BTW, I have been putting the G3s through my normal hiking boot break in process, which I must say is a bit different because the materials composition is just different but basically lacing them up tight, with the right socks on, and walking around doing chores in them as you would a normal pair of work boots, working them in, toe raises etc as you go. More of that tomorrow but they are really pretty good now. I will cleat them tomorrow evening and hit the water Sat morning. Thanks again.
 

City Rat

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So in answer to my own question from box to broken in, in my case, two weeks. Four different streams now, wading from ankle to hip deep, soft water to zesty and the G3s are as comfortable as any GTX class hiking boot I've ever owned. I added the Hardbite Star cleats a week ago and I feel pretty sure footed but I'm looking for a little extra bite at the front of the toe box and a little farther back in the heel. adding a couple of 3/8" Koldkutters to the mix and I think that this box will be fully checked. Thanks again to all who gently helped the newbie get down the right road.
 

Ard

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It's so nice when folks come back and report results :) When I saw this post I took a breath before clicking hoping you were not going to say these boots suck!

I like mine
 

City Rat

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Ard,
No way. I'm all in on the G3 bandwagon. I was really worried in the store while trying them on that it it would take forever to get them organized. Wearing them around all day in the summer heat I think helped mold the insides a bit faster to me feet. Add the right socks and a couple of lace locks(old school backpacker lacing schemes) to lock both my heel and the ball of my feet in place, and I was cooking with gas! Many thanks for the advice on this one.
 

Ard

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I just happen to have a picture of the sole of one of my boots.



That is where I placed the cleats 3 seasons ago and they are working for me. In the past I've loaded boot soles with star bite cleats and hard bite screws all over the middle of the sole but didn't notice anything as far as better grip goes. I also lost most of the center mounted cleats so when I got a new pair I went for perimeter coverage and they are working great. You can see via the wear on the aluminum that they are contacting with the substrate and I would add that I'm no sliding around.

One last thing... get yourself an extra pair of boot laces and put them in whatever you always carry with when fishing. Not many things can dampen a day like the lace busting on a boot.
 
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