Backing for salmon fishing?

ChrisinselwynNZ

Well-known member
Messages
808
Reaction score
11
Location
Christchurch NZ
I am just about too get my first spey rod, 13' 7 or 8 wt (still need too try them its the scott or air flo and it takes a month to get them into NZ:(), there is no doubt that I will need a skagit head with long 9ips sink tips (for salmon, and sea run's).

What rating do I need for the backing is 20lb going too be enough (I will use some heavy tippet upto 30 lb in the large rivers), the guy in the store thinks it should do but he only fishes for trout in creeks (the last thing I want is too loose the line), and is 100 yards enough or should I be using more.

The rivers I will be fishing are 100-400 cumecs (cubic meters per second) flow (fast flowing, deep and wide) and salmon are normaly 10-30 lb chinnok

Thanks
Chris
 

mcnerney

Administrator
Messages
20,772
Reaction score
243
Location
Pinedale, WY
Chris: You will want to use heavier backing when going after salmon. You don't want the weakest point in your setup to be the backing, trust me on this I learned the hard way. Your weakest point should be the tippet. When I fished in AK I used 25 lb tippet and the backing was approx. 35 lb.

Larry
 

Ard

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
21,666
Reaction score
4,532
Location
Wasilla / Skwentna, Alaska
Dittos to Larry,

I use 36 lb Cortland Saltwater Micron and never heavier than 25 lb on the leader. The trick is, don't let the fish into the backing.

Ard
 

Frank Whiton

Most Senior Member
Messages
5,413
Reaction score
35
Location
Central Florida
Hi Chris,

I agree with Larry and Ard. As to how much backing you should use, it depends on the reel. If you have a big large arbor reel you want the backing and fly line to fill up the spool less some clearance. So it could be 100 yards but it could also be 200 yards or more depending on the reel capacity and the Spey line length.

Frank
 

fredaevans

Well-known member
Messages
11,301
Reaction score
110
Location
White City (tad north of Medford) Oar-E-Gone
Add me to the ditto's above. The interior line in a spey line will frequently be 20# test on lines rated 6 and down, 30# on lines 7 and up. So if it's a really light spey (obviously not given the intended use) 20 would be fine; but not in this case; use 30# if you want a 'regular' Dacron type backing material or something a tad higher if your reel will hold same.

Lastly, don't worry about putting 'gobs' of backing on your reel; 125-150 yards is plenty. Why? Well lets assume you're using a 10' leader, the typical spey line will be 120' long (some like the Carron's will go to 150) and the fish just gets 30 yards of backing off your reel.

Let's see now:
10'
120'
90'
----------
At that point the fish is 220'** off the reel; what do you think the chances are that you'll land same?

fae

** For comparison, 220' is tick short of three quarters of the length of a standard football field.

Edit: "..... and never heavier than 25 lb on the leader." My God Ard, you don't fool around do you!!!!!
 

MoscaPescador

Well-known member
Messages
3,848
Reaction score
46
Location
Northern California
If you don't have as much backing capacity as you wish for, you can always use a super braid type line for backing. I'm a big fan of Daiwa Saltiga Boat Braid. In the 55 pound test rating, it is the same diameter as 12 pound test Dacron. It also lays down flat and is not abrasive like GSP fiber braids.

MP
 
Top