Bad News

flav

Well-known member
Messages
1,264
Reaction score
553
Location
oregon
I was already thinking I might not swing a fly for steelhead this fall due to the dismal returns. Now the decision has been made for me, as my favourite rivers are closed. It's sad, but not unexpected, and I definitely support the decision.
For each of the last 5 years the returns have dwindled significantly as ocean conditions changed and forage disappeared. I knew it was only a matter of a few years before closures became a reality.
 

Acheron

Well-known member
Messages
1,130
Reaction score
919
Location
Colorado
Life is not static. Enjoy what you have today, tomorrow it may be gone.

Thinking about another AK trip next year and looking up salmon returns for some rivers...it's abysmal. To be fair (LetterKenny fans are singing!), some rivers have had unexpected epic returns. It's odd.
 

fatbillybob

Well-known member
Messages
732
Reaction score
473
I was already thinking I might not swing a fly for steelhead this fall due to the dismal returns. Now the decision has been made for me, as my favourite rivers are closed. It's sad, but not unexpected, and I definitely support the decision.
For each of the last 5 years the returns have dwindled significantly as ocean conditions changed and forage disappeared. I knew it was only a matter of a few years before closures became a reality.
The sad thing is river closure to fishermen is like 1 guy who picks up 1 piece of trash on the beach. Much more than an occasional river closure needs to be done as these fish continue to decline. We have environmental decline everywhere. Bonefish in Florida as another example.
 

duker

Well-known member
Messages
1,199
Reaction score
336
Location
Gulf Islands
I've been following the proposed Skeena closures, as a buddy and I were planning our usual fall trip to the Bulkley. Not this year tho'. After the absolutely crappy returns the last couple of years I wouldn't have thought it could get any worse, but here we are. I remember speaking with a guy in Smithers a couple years back when the temps were high, rivers low, and steelhead scarce--he'd been fishing for a week, nothing caught, and was heading back home. His conclusion: "you know, sometimes the fish need a rest." I was packed up and out of there a couple days later.

As others have pointed out, closures are a start, but a more holistic approach is needed. I know, I know--easy to say, hard to do.
 

flav

Well-known member
Messages
1,264
Reaction score
553
Location
oregon
I wonder if a lot of swingers are going to go "trout spey" to feel some tugs?
I think that may be happening to some extent. I had a feeling I would be doing very little swinging for steelhead this year, so I've been swinging soft hackles for my local trout to fill that void when the fish aren't rising. I've tried the trout Spey thing, it's not for me. I do like casting a single hand Spey line on my 9 foot 4 weight, feeling those tight line grabs, and hearing my reel squawk when a nice trout grabs my fly and heads downstream. It's not the power of a steelhead, but it's fun.
 

MCHammer

Well-known member
Messages
303
Reaction score
289
Location
Tetonia, Idaho
I wonder if a lot of swingers are going to go "trout spey" to feel some tugs?
I've been doing that for about 7 years now, not because of the declining steelhead numbers, but because it's a lot of fun. But it looks as if I'll be doing it more and more in the future.
 

tcorfey

Well-known member
Messages
2,272
Reaction score
1,194
Location
SF Bay area California
Seems we are getting to the end of an era for anadromous fisheries and the efforts being made are too little to late.I hope not but, that is the way it seems to me. Sure there is still some catching to do in isolated time frames in various places but I can't for-see a rebound of the general stock in the near future.

The ocean Salmon counts on the west coast (CA through to WA) up until the 80's were over one million, over the last 5 years they average 145 thousand or about one tenth the number of fish we used to get. Not real encouraging to say the least. Dams (reduced spawning habitat and water temp increases due to low flow), agriculture (excessive water usage and run-off), pollution (run-off), climate change, ocean bio-mass decline, drought, large fires, mis-management of resources (like reducing water flow after the spawn which exposes the spawning beds), logging (again reduced spawning habitat and water temp increases), population growth and even fishing all play a factor in this decline.
 
Top