Brett's Klamath Skater

flytie09

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Brett's Klamath Skater

A rather unique pattern from long time N. CA Steelhead Guide, Brett Jensen. This one simply stood out to me from all of the other skaters I've seen. Perhaps it was the jungle cock eyes? Perhaps it's because I don't have to spin the deer hair. 🤪 Kind of like an elk hair caddis that's taking roids and did a line of coke in the bathroom. He's ready to party.💊 🏋️‍♂️🤑

I don't have a ton of opportunities to pursue Steelhead living in SW Va. And I've probably tied enough muddlers, skater and wakers for the next 40 years of fishing. So this is probably my last. If I make it to the Deschutes later this Summer....perhaps the fish will catch a glimpse of this monster skating through their neighborhood.

From Aquaflies:

About Brett Jensen:
brett jensen.jpg

It was on the Big Sur River where in 1972 Brett Jensen caught his first fish on a fly. It was more than just a special moment; it is what triggered a lifelong addiction to fly fishing.

With the opening of the Millpond Fly Shop in San Jose, CA, in 1973, Brett quickly became friends with owner Len Bearden, and through Len was exposed to several talented anglers. Exposure to pioneer anglers like Bob Quigley, Hal Janssen, Dave Inks, Dave Whitlock, Bob Edgley, and Lawrence Summers had quite an influence on Brett. But, it was Ed Hamada's influence and mentoring that encouraged Brett “to think outside the box” and approach not only fly tying but fly fishing creatively.

In 1977, Brett left his home town of Los Gatos and moved to Palo Cedro, a small town east of Redding, California. Since then he has guided and photographed his home waters, becoming recognized for his innovative fly patterns for both stillwater and steelhead. He has been a guest speaker for Trout Unlimited and the Federation of Fly Fishers conclave. He has presented numerous slide programs and tying demonstrations for fly clubs in Northern and Southern California, Arizona, Oregon and Nevada. His photographs and articles on fly tying have appeared in several popular fly fishing publications. In 1989, together with lifelong fishing partner Rick Jorgensen, he started Klamath Connections and for several years ran a successful guide service on the Lower Klamath River.

It is the Klamath that Brett considers his home river and the Klamath has been the inspiration for many of his summer and fall steelhead patterns. He ties his patterns with attention to materials that not only give his flies a look but lets them perform as designed when fished.


Since embracing the two-handed rod, Brett's fishing time has been spent pursuing salmon on the rivers of the North Coast, and chasing steelhead in Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Northern California, and of course on the Klamath.

bretts klamath skater.jpg

Hook - Size 4 Salmon
Tag - Large pearl tinsel
Body - Senyo Ice dub (orange, light brown, green, purple)
Rib - Small silver oval tinsel
Wing - Bronze mallard, a couple tufts of peacock angel hair topped with small deer body hair
Skate deck - wedge of 2mm craft foam
Eye - Jungle Cock nails
Head - Black thread

It can be tied in an all black version as well.

Here's the tutorial:

 
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huronfly

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I like this skater a lot, great tie. A buddy and I are dedicating September to skating dries for steel, this looks like it may be a top contender.
 

flytie09

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Looks like something I can manage. The recipe doesn't mention the foam.
I included the craft foam to the recipe. I didn’t know what to call it. A “skate deck” is what I found.
 

duker

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Foam "skate decks" or whatever seem to be a thing these days. Last fall when I was steelhead fishing on the Bulkley, I went to a fly-tying seminar at Oscar's and the Fly du Jour was a skater pattern (honestly forget the name now) with a crystal dub body, split moose hair wings, with a huge foam "wing" over that and another, smaller pointy piece of bright yellow foam on top of that the guy at the seminar called the "wang". When you skated it, that little yellow wang just stood straight up and you could easily track it right across the river. I gotta say, it was pretty cool.

And that basically convinced me to add foam wings or skate decks or whatever to "skater" flies for steelhead. I caught a very small steelhead last year on a good old elk hair caddis, but after an hour or so of skating those get pretty wet and bedraggled.

Sorry to hijack the thread.
 

flytie09

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Foam "skate decks" or whatever seem to be a thing these days. Last fall when I was steelhead fishing on the Bulkley, I went to a fly-tying seminar at Oscar's and the Fly du Jour was a skater pattern (honestly forget the name now) with a crystal dub body, split moose hair wings, with a huge foam "wing" over that and another, smaller pointy piece of bright yellow foam on top of that the guy at the seminar called the "wang". When you skated it, that little yellow wang just stood straight up and you could easily track it right across the river. I gotta say, it was pretty cool.

And that basically convinced me to add foam wings or skate decks or whatever to "skater" flies for steelhead. I caught a very small steelhead last year on a good old elk hair caddis, but after an hour or so of skating those get pretty wet and bedraggled.

Sorry to hijack the thread.
Was it Todd Hirano by chance giving the seminar? He invented the “Wang”. Crazy looking thing.
 

duker

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Not Todd Hirano, Mike. I honestly can't remember the guy's name--proof I'm getting old. He's from Ontario and comes to Northern BC for steelhead every fall, and usually puts on a fly tying seminar at Oscar's Sports.

All of us at the seminar agreed that the "wang" was a crazy looking thing, but could barely wait to get out and swing it. Fascinating to watch that little yellow wang skittering across the river.

Scott
 
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