Brown trout habitat

TristianSutton

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Why does it seem all brown streams seem to be these slightly grungy streams, that are always slightly off color

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flytie09

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I know tons of places they’re in clean water. Tail waters, spring creeks and freestones all come to mind in my local area. It is true however (I think) that they can tolerate water conditions most other Salmonids couldn’t.

I know of several highly tannin stained waters in central NY where I grew up that are loaded with Brook trout.
 

osseous

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In New Zealand, they float in air...

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bruce m

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Rivers around me are normally clear to crystal clear except maybe after a heck of a lot of rain and runoff
 

FlymanSJB

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Gin clear in my neck of the woods, but I prefer a little stain in the water, makes the catching a hell of a lot easier otherwise its best to wait till dusk for the hatch or skate caddis and wake mice after dark.
 

kevind62

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Why does it seem all brown streams seem to be these slightly grungy streams, that are always slightly off color

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With the current global conditions you're probably just fishing downstream of someone who wasn't able to find toilet paper. Just saying. :D
 

Bigfly

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Often our water gets the label "Brown town". They are more likely here in the same number as bows, but, couldn't prove it buy the numbers caught.
I had a very hard charging student last year, he fished with me nearly every day, but went almost a year without meeting Mr B. Then, last muddy Spring, he figured it out and went on a tear.
Off color water is his favorite now.
It's partly the type of water as well, slightly softer...slower...for the bigger guys. They are still around when the water clears, but that is when assuming a nynja approach is best..
You can't just bumble around at high noon and hope for Walter.
Stay hidden, make as few drifts as possible in any particular spot. Rest the hole often....most fishers make a drift followed by umpteen more.
Show them less, so they think they are alone. They are hip to us....... I would give up rainbows in a minute, to just hunt a brown of renown. Although bows are athletic, they have half as much guile. Those avoiding fishing the off-colored water are missing out.


Jim
 

TristianSutton

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I was wondering if this thread might be an attempt at a little Brown Trout humor. If it was it got some bites...
It was not, its me trying to figure out why all the high population brown trout streams I know about locally to me, all seem to have this characteristic of slightly dirty water

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sweetandsalt

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Actually brook trout can tolerate more acidity than browns and rainbows warmer temperatures than browns. All my trout rivers run clear, east and west, except during a spate or snow melt.
 

osseous

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It was not, its me trying to figure out why all the high population brown trout streams I know about locally to me, all seem to have this characteristic of slightly dirty water

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Probably a measure by the local DNR to put a more hearty species in more compromised water.

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TristianSutton

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Probably a measure by the local DNR to put a more hearty species in more compromised water.

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None of the streams are stocked all are wild populations

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osseous

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Browns are non-native, which means they were stocked at some point in time

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sweetandsalt

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TS, Are you fishing tailwaters bellow hydro release dams? That may account for turbidity.

Bigfly, I have a story relative to yours. Silver Creek in Idaho is a perfect trout habitat; constant flow and temperature year round and fecund. Rainbows were stocked there many decades ago and continue to come in via feeder creek home to a State rainbow hatchery. In fact it is the example I used during the Trout Pandemic of Whirling Disease. No whirling disease on Silver Creek where the habitat was just perfect while on low, warm water Colorado rivers or the Madison that had suffered sever spawning habitat destruction, rainbow numbers were way down. Its habitat I said, don't raise money to fight a disease or ban felt soles, intact legislation to protect the habitat.

Any way, browns were not exactly stocked there but in the middle of the night a man of note dumped a bucket full of little brown trout into the Conservancy water. Shocking reveals that browns now constitute some 40% of the spring creeks population and specimens up to 10 pounds have been shocked. However, browns represent a small proportion of anglers' catches. You may catch rainbows all day but only if you fish into the late dusk do you fare better with the browns. Also, the bows will feed on current seams out in the open and that sip in the shadows of the cut bank...that is a brown.

Browns were introduced in North America in the 1880's but never domesticated well, unlike rainbows. Though non-native, stream bred browns retain their cagy, wild characteristics and though I love them both, browns of size are often more rewarding to feed a dry fly to.
 

Bigfly

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Probably why I like Browns...I didn't domesticate well either.....
Who wants to hunt fish that anyone can catch? No test there.....

Jim
 

TristianSutton

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TS, Are you fishing tailwaters bellow hydro release dams? That may account for turbidity.

Bigfly, I have a story relative to yours. Silver Creek in Idaho is a perfect trout habitat; constant flow and temperature year round and fecund. Rainbows were stocked there many decades ago and continue to come in via feeder creek home to a State rainbow hatchery. In fact it is the example I used during the Trout Pandemic of Whirling Disease. No whirling disease on Silver Creek where the habitat was just perfect while on low, warm water Colorado rivers or the Madison that had suffered sever spawning habitat destruction, rainbow numbers were way down. Its habitat I said, don't raise money to fight a disease or ban felt soles, intact legislation to protect the habitat.

Any way, browns were not exactly stocked there but in the middle of the night a man of note dumped a bucket full of little brown trout into the Conservancy water. Shocking reveals that browns now constitute some 40% of the spring creeks population and specimens up to 10 pounds have been shocked. However, browns represent a small proportion of anglers' catches. You may catch rainbows all day but only if you fish into the late dusk do you fare better with the browns. Also, the bows will feed on current seams out in the open and that sip in the shadows of the cut bank...that is a brown.

Browns were introduced in North America in the 1880's but never domesticated well, unlike rainbows. Though non-native, stream bred browns retain their cagy, wild characteristics and though I love them both, browns of size are often more rewarding to feed a dry fly to.
No i fish almost exclusively on freestone streams, personally never cared for tail races

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sweetandsalt

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In my experience both in the North East and northern Rocky Mountain country, freestone rivers run clear baring snow melt or storm run off. Freestones by virtue of gravity are rarely mud or detritus laden unless there is upstream construction, mining or other stream bed disruption.
 
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