Browning Silaflex Model 122910 Line 6

glacierjohn

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Hello all,
I'm writing about the Sliaflex rod noted in the title. I bought this rod new at Untited Sporting Goods in North Hollywood when I was in 12th grade, around 1968. I was making money working a high school job and bought a rod for both me and my dad. We had been drooling over these rods for some time along with the Conolon Garcia rods, but it seemed like the Browning Silaflex was a step up in quality so I went that route.

My Dad's rod was a conventional two piece 8' seven weight, while mine is a bit more interesting. All together it is a 7'-8" six line, but with a very-very soft tip going into a stiff butt. The third of the rod toward the tip is super whippy, can cast a four weight line easily, but I fished it back in the day with a double taper six weight. What makes this rod interesting is it is a three piece that can be assembled in two configurations. The nice cork handle with quality aluminum downlocking reel seat is removable, then there is a short 16 1/4" butt section and a longer 5'-5" "tip" section. With the o-ring spigot ferules you can set aside the 16" mid section and plug the long tip section right into the handle for a nice 6'-4" little creek trout rod.

I still have a Fenwick rod that is maybe 2-3 years newer, early 70's that feels way more modern in action, but isn't as nicely finished. Also going by memory it seems my Dad's rod was not as tippy. Anybody else have any experience with this old Silaflex? I'll tell you one thing, a six inch Brookie feels like a giant on this rod.
 

mcnerney

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John: I don't have experience with that rod, but it sure sounds like a perfect small stream rod, especially with the history that goes along with it, congrats for hanging onto it for so long.
 

glacierjohn

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John: I don't have experience with that rod, but it sure sounds like a perfect small stream rod, especially with the history that goes along with it, congrats for hanging onto it for so long.
Thanks. Here's a pic of it disassembled showing how that 16" middle section can be used or not...


---------- Post added at 05:19 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:59 PM ----------

I just threw an old Lamson DCA3 that is loaded with a peach 444 DT6F on that Silaflex and casted it around the yard. Wow, it was much better than I remember, I think I'll take it fishing next time out, or do I take my new Sweetgrass 4-5, or just stick with my old reliable Scotts?
 

troutnut4

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My first glass fly rod was a Browning Silaflex 322986 (1970) in a 2 piece 8'-6" for 8/9 or 7 weight as noted on the rod. 8/9 being the preferred weights of the manufacturer. I fished it twice and decided to move to a Fenwick 9' 8 weight for salmon and forget the heavy Browning rod. I will occasionally lawn cat the rod to remind me of the progress made over the 40 plus years in this sport. After casting my glass (modern) and graphite rods, the Browning feels like a broom handle but I wouldn't part with it. It reminds me of my youth when casting all day wasn't an issue. :D Sorry to highjack the OP.
 

glacierjohn

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My first glass fly rod was a Browning Silaflex 322986 (1970) in a 2 piece 8'-6" for 8/9 or 7 weight as noted on the rod. 8/9 being the preferred weights of the manufacturer. I fished it twice and decided to move to a Fenwick 9' 8 weight for salmon and forget the heavy Browning rod. I will occasionally lawn cat the rod to remind me of the progress made over the 40 plus years in this sport. After casting my glass (modern) and graphite rods, the Browning feels like a broom handle but I wouldn't part with it. It reminds me of my youth when casting all day wasn't an issue. :D Sorry to highjack the OP.
It is really incredible how far we have come since the mid-60s. Back then, at least as far as I knew from looking at a few catalogs and perusing fly tackle in my local sporting goods store, there wasn't much to choose from. Garcia-Conolon had a series of fly rods in their catalog, but I rarely saw one in our local shops. Wright-McGill sold that spin-fly pack rod many of us grew up on, and there was Browning-Silaflex clearly a step up from the others. Fenwick didn't exist yet, no Scott, Sage or Winston that I knew of. Orvis was such a rich man's outfitter it may as well have been Holland and Holland as far as my dad was concerned.

I too switched over to Fenwick shortly after they became the rage in the early 70's. With that sleeve ferrule design and faster tapers they were a revolution.
 
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